Special Issue "Probiotics: From Quality Assessment to Microbial Ecology"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Simone Guglielmetti

Department of Food, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: probiotics; food microbiology; impact of food components on the intestinal microbial ecosystem; host-associated microbial ecology
Guest Editor
Dr. Valentina Taverniti

Department of Food, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: probiotics; food microbiology; interaction with host’s immune system; microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of selected microbial cultures to prevent or treat pathologic conditions has gained a wide popularity, leading to the development of a constantly increasing number of foods and supplements (probiotics, sensu strictu) and medical applications (more properly defined as live biotherapeutics).

This Special Issue of Microorganisms focuses on the ecological and microbiological aspects related to probiotic products and their impact on host-associated microbiotas. We invite you to send contributions on the most recent scientific research on probiotics, including:

- microbiological aspects of probiotics and live biotherapeutic formulations (e.g., assessment of microbial viability and taxonomic quality of probiotic commercial products);

- probiotic persistence in and colonization of host’s ecological niches (e.g., probiotic recovery studies);

- modulation of host-associated microbiotas and microbiomes by probiotics;

- impact of probiotics on the microbial metabolism of food components in the host’s gastro-intestinal tract (including the oral cavity);

- isolation and characterization of next-generation probiotics to be employed as live biotherapeutics.

This Special Issue is not restricted to reports describing the oral intake of probiotics and the related effects on the gastrointestinal tract, but also comprises studies on the topical administration of probiotics, for instance skin and vaginal applications. In addition, studies on inactivated microorganisms (paraprobiotics) or their secreted products (postbiotics) are also welcome.

Prof. Simone Guglielmetti
Dr. Valentina Taverniti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • probiotics
  • live biotherapeutics
  • microbiota
  • microbiome

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle The Foodborne Strain Lactobacillus fermentum MBC2 Triggers pept-1-Dependent Pro-Longevity Effects in Caenorhabditis elegans
Microorganisms 2019, 7(2), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020045
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 21 January 2019 / Accepted: 7 February 2019 / Published: 7 February 2019
PDF Full-text (2766 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are involved in several food fermentations and many of them provide strain-specific health benefits. Herein, the probiotic potential of the foodborne strain Lactobacillus fermentum MBC2 was investigated through in vitro and in vivo approaches. Caenorhabditis elegans was used as [...] Read more.
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are involved in several food fermentations and many of them provide strain-specific health benefits. Herein, the probiotic potential of the foodborne strain Lactobacillus fermentum MBC2 was investigated through in vitro and in vivo approaches. Caenorhabditis elegans was used as an in vivo model to analyze pro-longevity and anti-aging effects. L. fermentum MBC2 showed a high gut colonization capability compared to E. coli OP50 (OP50) or L. rhamnosus GG (LGG). Moreover, analysis of pumping rate, lipofuscin accumulation, and body bending showed anti-aging effects in L. fermentum MBC2-fed worms. Studies on PEPT-1 mutants demonstrated that pept-1 gene was involved in the anti-aging processes mediated by this bacterial strain through DAF-16, whereas the oxidative stress protection was PEPT-1 independent. Moreover, analysis of acid tolerance, bile tolerance, and antibiotic susceptibility were evaluated. L. fermentum MBC2 exerted beneficial effects on nematode lifespan, influencing energy metabolism and oxidative stress resistance, resulted in being tolerant to acidic pH and able to adhere to Caco-2 cells. Overall, these findings provide new insight for application of this strain in the food industry as a newly isolated functional starter. Furthermore, these results will also shed light on C. elegans molecular players involved in host-microbe interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics: From Quality Assessment to Microbial Ecology)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Employment of L. paracasei K5 as a Novel Potentially Probiotic Freeze-Dried Starter for Feta-Type Cheese Production
Microorganisms 2019, 7(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7010003
Received: 30 October 2018 / Revised: 20 December 2018 / Accepted: 22 December 2018 / Published: 26 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2103 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the present study, a novel potentially probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei strain, previously isolated from dairy products, was evaluated as a starter culture of Feta-type cheese production. Targeting industrial applications, the starter culture was applied as a ready-to-use freeze-dried culture that was either free [...] Read more.
In the present study, a novel potentially probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei strain, previously isolated from dairy products, was evaluated as a starter culture of Feta-type cheese production. Targeting industrial applications, the starter culture was applied as a ready-to-use freeze-dried culture that was either free or immobilized. The immobilized biocatalyst composed of Lactobacillus paracasei K5 cells absorbed within delignified wheat bran prebiotic carrier. All produced cheeses were compared with cheese manufactured by renin enzyme. Several parameters that affect acceptability, quality and shelf-life of Feta-type cheese were investigated, including microbial populations, physicochemical characteristics and cheese volatiles through 90 days of ripening and storage. Survival of L. paracasei K5 remained in high levels (≥6.0 log cfu/g) after the 90th day of cheese production, as recorded by combining microbiological enumeration and strain-specific multiplex PCR analysis. The use of the freeze-dried novel starter culture (free or immobilized) enhanced the aromatic profile of Feta-type cheeses. Finally, the use of the potentially synbiotic immobilized biocatalyst further improved aromatic characteristics of produced cheese and decrease of possible spoilage or pathogenic microorganisms. These findings indicate the potential industrial use of freeze-dried L. paracasei K5 as starter culture for the production of good-quality functional Feta-type cheese. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics: From Quality Assessment to Microbial Ecology)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Microorganisms EISSN 2076-2607 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top