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Open AccessArticle

Probiotic Supplementation in a Clostridium difficile-Infected Gastrointestinal Model Is Associated with Restoring Metabolic Function of Microbiota

1
School of Human Nutrition, McGill University, 21111 Lakeshore, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Montréal, QC H9X3V9, Canada
2
Rosell Institute for Microbiome and Probiotics, 6100 Royalmount Avenue, Montréal, QC H4P 2R2, Canada
3
Energy, Mining and Environment, National Research Council Canada, 6100 Royalmount Avenue, Montreal, QC H4P 2R2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(1), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8010060
Received: 8 November 2019 / Revised: 20 December 2019 / Accepted: 27 December 2019 / Published: 29 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics: From Quality Assessment to Microbial Ecology)
Clostridium (C.) difficile-infection (CDI), a nosocomial gastrointestinal disorder, is of growing concern due to its rapid rise in recent years. Antibiotic therapy of CDI is associated with disrupted metabolic function and altered gut microbiota. The use of probiotics as an adjunct is being studied extensively due to their potential to modulate metabolic functions and the gut microbiota. In the present study, we assessed the ability of several single strain probiotics and a probiotic mixture to change the metabolic functions of normal and C. difficile-infected fecal samples. The production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and ammonia was measured, and changes in microbial composition were assessed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. The C. difficile-infection in fecal samples resulted in a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in SCFA and H2S production, with a lower microbial alpha diversity. All probiotic treatments were associated with significantly increased (p < 0.05) levels of SCFAs and restored H2S levels. Probiotics showed no effect on microbial composition of either normal or C. difficile-infected fecal samples. These findings indicate that probiotics may be useful to improve the metabolic dysregulation associated with C. difficile infection. View Full-Text
Keywords: human gut microbiota; Clostridium difficile; probiotics; gastrointestinal model; short chain fatty acids; hydrogen sulfide; ammonium; 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing human gut microbiota; Clostridium difficile; probiotics; gastrointestinal model; short chain fatty acids; hydrogen sulfide; ammonium; 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing
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Gaisawat, M.B.; MacPherson, C.W.; Tremblay, J.; Piano, A.; Iskandar, M.M.; Tompkins, T.A.; Kubow, S. Probiotic Supplementation in a Clostridium difficile-Infected Gastrointestinal Model Is Associated with Restoring Metabolic Function of Microbiota. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 60.

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