Special Issue "Foodborne Pathogen Distribution, Ecology, Inactivation and Methods of Differentiation"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Ross C. Beier

Food and Feed Safety Research Unit, Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, College Station, TX 77845, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: foodborne pathogens in livestock and poultry; antibody; food safety; feed safety
Guest Editor
Dr. Steven L. Foley

Division of Microbiology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: antimicrobial resistance and virulence of foodborne and zoonotic pathogens; evaluation of the diversity of plasmids associated with Salmonella to identify their impact on pathogenicity; investigate the role of antimicrobial exposure that may influence plasmid transfer among Salmonella and other enteric organisms; develop methods for differentiation among bacterial foodborne pathogens
Guest Editor
Dr. Roger B. Harvey

Food and Feed Safety Research Unit, Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, College Station, TX 77845, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 1-979-260-9259
Interests: pre-harvest food safety; characterize the effects of natural toxins and enteropathogens on food-producing animals; develop intervention strategies to mitigate the impact of these agents upon the food chain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Foodborne pathogens are a major cause of diarrheal disease throughout the world. In the United States alone, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has estimated that foodborne pathogens cause 48 million people to get sick and 3000 to die from foodborne illnesses each year. The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that worldwide 600 million foodborne illnesses occur each year, and the most frequent cause of foodborne illness is the diarrheal disease agents resulting in 230,000 deaths per year. Also, 40% of the foodborne illnesses were observed among children under 5 years old. Therefore, further progress in understanding these bacteria is required to help combat the foodborne diarrheal disease problem.

This Special Issue will publish work in distribution, ecology, inactivation and methods development for differentiation of foodborne pathogens. Special emphasis will be placed on studies of food animal derived foodborne pathogens such as Campylobacter, Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus. Researchers conducting original laboratory studies as well as critical review papers are cordially invited to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue of Microorganisms.

Dr. Ross C. Beier
Dr. Steven L. Foley
Dr. Roger B. Harvey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • foodborne pathogen
  • Campylobacter
  • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  • non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli
  • Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus
  • food safety
  • feed safety

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Establishment of Listeria monocytogenes in the Gastrointestinal Tract
Microorganisms 2019, 7(3), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7030075
Received: 5 February 2019 / Revised: 5 March 2019 / Accepted: 5 March 2019 / Published: 10 March 2019
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Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram positive foodborne pathogen that can colonize the gastrointestinal tract of a number of hosts, including humans. These environments contain numerous stressors such as bile, low oxygen and acidic pH, which may impact the level of colonization and persistence [...] Read more.
Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram positive foodborne pathogen that can colonize the gastrointestinal tract of a number of hosts, including humans. These environments contain numerous stressors such as bile, low oxygen and acidic pH, which may impact the level of colonization and persistence of this organism within the GI tract. The ability of L. monocytogenes to establish infections and colonize the gastrointestinal tract is directly related to its ability to overcome these stressors, which is mediated by the efficient expression of several stress response mechanisms during its passage. This review will focus upon how and when this occurs and how this impacts the outcome of foodborne disease. Full article
Open AccessReview Modulation of the Immune Response to Improve Health and Reduce Foodborne Pathogens in Poultry
Microorganisms 2019, 7(3), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7030065
Received: 18 December 2018 / Revised: 19 February 2019 / Accepted: 21 February 2019 / Published: 28 February 2019
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Abstract
Salmonella and Campylobacter are the two leading causes of bacterial-induced foodborne illness in the US. Food production animals including cattle, swine, and chickens are transmission sources for both pathogens. The number of Salmonella outbreaks attributed to poultry has decreased. However, the same cannot [...] Read more.
Salmonella and Campylobacter are the two leading causes of bacterial-induced foodborne illness in the US. Food production animals including cattle, swine, and chickens are transmission sources for both pathogens. The number of Salmonella outbreaks attributed to poultry has decreased. However, the same cannot be said for Campylobacter where 50–70% of human cases result from poultry products. The poultry industry selects heavily on performance traits which adversely affects immune competence. Despite increasing demand for poultry, regulations and public outcry resulted in the ban of antibiotic growth promoters, pressuring the industry to find alternatives to manage flock health. One approach is to incorporate a program that naturally enhances/modulates the bird’s immune response. Immunomodulation of the immune system can be achieved using a targeted dietary supplementation and/or feed additive to alter immune function. Science-based modulation of the immune system targets ways to reduce inflammation, boost a weakened response, manage gut health, and provide an alternative approach to prevent disease and control foodborne pathogens when conventional methods are not efficacious or not available. The role of immunomodulation is just one aspect of an integrated, coordinated approach to produce healthy birds that are also safe and wholesome products for consumers. Full article
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