Special Issue "Non-conventional Yeasts: Genomics and Biotechnology"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jürgen Wendland

Research Group of Microbiology (MICR), Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) Pleinlaan 2, BE-1050 Brussels, Belgium
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Beyond the well-known model organisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, there is a fascinating world of other yeasts. These non-conventional yeasts are already contributing enormously to all aspects of microbiology, genetics, biotechnology and fermentation, bioengineering, synthetic biology, and medical biology. This is because of their novel and often unique features, vastly untapped resources, and capabilities (e.g., based on their metabolism, fermentation capacities, substrate utilization, enzyme production, secondary metabolite/volatile aroma compound/flavor production, cell biology, or as biocontrol organisms to be used in modern sustainable agriculture).

Modern technologies allow for the characterization of non-conventional yeasts at an unprecedented level. With powerful omics tools and genome editing capabilities, non-conventional yeasts are amenable to genetic engineering and have a lot to contribute in diverse sectors.

This Special Issue, “Non-conventional Yeasts: Genomics and Biotechnology”, serves to highlight the biodiversity and different the facets of non-conventional yeasts.

It will support publication of contributions on the following topics:

  • The general biology of non-conventional yeasts: biodiversity/taxonomy, evolution, ecology, physiology and metabolism, cell biology, signaling, or stress responses;
  • The genetics, genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics of non-conventional yeasts (e.g., covering whole genome sequencing and assemblies, gene expression or analyses of plasmids, mating types, centromeres, telomere gene organization, or gene family evolution);
  • The role of non-conventional yeasts in agriculture (e.g., as biocontrol strains, biofertilizers, and growth-promoting microbes);
  • Basic and applied studies on biotechnology/bioengineering or fermentations for food and beverage, chemicals, and protein production;
  • Systems biology and synthetic biology; and
  • Genome editing including cool tools and analytics for working with non-conventional yeasts

Prof. Dr. Jürgen Wendland
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Exploitation of Three Non-Conventional Yeast Species in the Brewing Process
Microorganisms 2019, 7(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7010011
Received: 3 December 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 2 January 2019 / Published: 8 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4783 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Consumers require high-quality beers with specific enhanced flavor profiles and non-conventional yeasts could represent a large source of bioflavoring diversity to obtain new beer styles. In this work, we investigated the use of three different non-conventional yeasts belonging to Lachancea thermotolerans, Wickerhamomyces [...] Read more.
Consumers require high-quality beers with specific enhanced flavor profiles and non-conventional yeasts could represent a large source of bioflavoring diversity to obtain new beer styles. In this work, we investigated the use of three different non-conventional yeasts belonging to Lachancea thermotolerans, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, and Zygotorulaspora florentina species in pure and mixed fermentation with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae commercial starter US-05. All three non-conventional yeasts were competitive in co-cultures with the S. cerevisiae, and they dominated fermentations with 1:20 ratio (S. cerevisiae/non-conventional yeasts ratios). Pure non-conventional yeasts and co-cultures affected significantly the beer aroma. A general reduction in acetaldehyde content in all mixed fermentations was found. L. thermotolerans and Z. florentina in mixed and W. anomalus in pure cultures increased higher alcohols. L. thermotolerans led to a large reduction in pH value, producing, in pure culture, a large amount of lactic acid (1.83 g/L) while showing an enhancement of ethyl butyrate and ethyl acetate in all pure and mixed fermentations. W. anomalus decreased the main aroma compounds in comparison with the S. cerevisiae but showed a significant increase in ethyl butyrate and ethyl acetate. Beers produced with Z. florentina were characterized by an increase in the isoamyl acetate and α-terpineol content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-conventional Yeasts: Genomics and Biotechnology)
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