Special Issue "Cellular and Molecular Basis of Plant-Fungal Interactions in Mycorrhizas"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Microbe Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Paola Bonfante
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Life science and System Biology, Università di Torino, Torino, Italy
Interests: plant-microbe interactions; omics applied to mycorrhizas; microbes and agriculture; endobacteria
Dr. Valentina Fiorilli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy
Interests: molecular and cellular aspects of plant–microbe interactions, mainly during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; plant response to biotic stress; role of phytohormones in plant growth and in response to microbes; apocarotenoids
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

What is the secret of the pervasive power of mycorrhizas and of their ecological success in all the environments of our planet? Mycorrhizal interactions involve more than 300,000 land plants and at least 50,000 fungal species belonging to all the major fungal taxa (from the Mucoromycota to Basidiomycota). They appear equally successful in colonizing different environments, from alpine and boreal zones to tropical forests and grasslands. This immense biodiversity leads to multiple methods of interaction, which differ in environmental adaptations, genetics, and physiology of the partners. However, many interesting similarities can be traced exploring the complexity of cell-to-cell contacts between plants and fungi, the molecules and the signaling pathways, which allow the establishment of the symbiosis, as well as the regulation of molecular determinants, which control downstream events leading to colonization and nutrient exchanges.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an updated view of what happens when the evolutionary pathways of fungi and plants cross each other leading to mycorrhizal symbiosis. Both original research and review contributions based on the most updated cell biology, analytical and molecular approaches applied to all the diverse mycorrhizal associations are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Paola Bonfante
Dr. Valentina Fiorilli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • confocal microscopy
  • “omics“ approaches
  • mutants
  • signaling molecules
  • effectors
  • plant and fungal membranes
  • epigenetics
  • natural variation
  • Hormones

  • Strigolactones

  • Nutrients

  • Phosphate

  • Defence response

  • Reporter genes

  • Mycorrhiza-induced resistance

  • Plant-mycorrhizal fungi-pathogen interaction

  • Priming

  • Nutrient transfer imaging 

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Genome-Wide Analysis of Nutrient Signaling Pathways Conserved in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi
Microorganisms 2021, 9(8), 1557; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9081557 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 387
Abstract
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form a mutualistic symbiosis with a majority of terrestrial vascular plants. To achieve an efficient nutrient trade with their hosts, AM fungi sense external and internal nutrients, and integrate different hierarchic regulations to optimize nutrient acquisition and homeostasis during [...] Read more.
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form a mutualistic symbiosis with a majority of terrestrial vascular plants. To achieve an efficient nutrient trade with their hosts, AM fungi sense external and internal nutrients, and integrate different hierarchic regulations to optimize nutrient acquisition and homeostasis during mycorrhization. However, the underlying molecular networks in AM fungi orchestrating the nutrient sensing and signaling remain elusive. Based on homology search, we here found that at least 72 gene components involved in four nutrient sensing and signaling pathways, including cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA), sucrose non-fermenting 1 (SNF1) protein kinase, target of rapamycin kinase (TOR) and phosphate (PHO) signaling cascades, are well conserved in AM fungi. Based on the knowledge known in model yeast and filamentous fungi, we outlined the possible gene networks functioning in AM fungi. These pathways may regulate the expression of downstream genes involved in nutrient transport, lipid metabolism, trehalase activity, stress resistance and autophagy. The RNA-seq analysis and qRT-PCR results of some core genes further indicate that these pathways may play important roles in spore germination, appressorium formation, arbuscule longevity and sporulation of AM fungi. We hope to inspire further studies on the roles of these candidate genes involved in these nutrient sensing and signaling pathways in AM fungi and AM symbiosis. Full article
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