Special Issue "Self-Powered Sensors and Micro-Systems"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "E:Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Zhiyi Wu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China
Interests: nanogenerators; self-powered sensors; wearable devices; flexible electronics and sensors; biomedical and implantable devices
Prof. Dr. Zhong Lin Wang
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245, USA
Interests: nanogenerators and self-powered nanosystems; piezotronics for smart systems; piezo-phototronics for energy science and optoelectronics; hybrid cells for energy harvesting
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sensor networks are essential for the development of the Internet of things and smart city. General sensors, especially mobile sensors, must be driven by a power unit. Considering the high mobility, wide distribution, and wireless operation of the sensors, their sustainable operation remains a critical challenge owing to the limited lifetime energy storage units. The concept of self-powered sensors and micro-systems signifies the harvesting of ambient energy for continuously driving a sensor without the use of an external power source, which aims to ensure the sensors can continuously work for a long duration without maintenance. Therefore, self-powered sensors and micro-systems are the inevitable trends for the future development of sensing technology. Accordingly, this Special Issue seeks to showcase research papers and review articles that focus on novel developments including, but not limited to, energy harvesting technology, active sensing technology, and battery technology to promote self-powered sensors and micro-systems in current applications.

We look forward to receiving your submissions!

Dr. Zhiyi Wu
Prof. Dr. Zhong Lin Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • self-powered sensors
  • self-powered micro/nanosystems
  • energy harvesting technology
  • active sensing technology
  • battery technology
  • power management circuit
  • wireless communication
  • low power electronics

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Technique for Measuring Power across High Resistive Load of Triboelectric Energy Harvester
Micromachines 2021, 12(7), 766; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12070766 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 502
Abstract
This paper proposed a more-accurate-than-conventional measurement technique for determining electrical power across exceptionally high-impedance of triboelectric energy harvester (TEH). The key idea of this proposed technique was to measure the voltage across an introduced, parallelly-connected resistor divider to the oscilloscope instead of the [...] Read more.
This paper proposed a more-accurate-than-conventional measurement technique for determining electrical power across exceptionally high-impedance of triboelectric energy harvester (TEH). The key idea of this proposed technique was to measure the voltage across an introduced, parallelly-connected resistor divider to the oscilloscope instead of the voltage across the harvester. An experiment was set up to verify the measurement accuracy performance of this technique against the ideal theoretical values. The maximum percentage error found was only 2.30%, while the conventional measurement technique could not be used to measure voltage across high impedance TEH at all because the readings were not accurate, i.e., the measurement error would be at least over 10%. Therefore, we concluded that this proposed technique should always be used instead of the conventional measurement technique for power measurement of any TEH. A suggestion that we would like to offer to researchers investigating or developing a TEH is that, in using our measurement technique, a good starting point for a load to probe resistance ratio is 1:10, a ratio that worked well for our TEH test bench that we developed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Powered Sensors and Micro-Systems)
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Article
Smart Wearable Sensors Based on Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Personal Healthcare Monitoring
Micromachines 2021, 12(4), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12040352 - 25 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1340
Abstract
Accurate monitoring of motion and sleep states is critical for human health assessment, especially for a healthy life, early diagnosis of diseases, and medical care. In this work, a smart wearable sensor (SWS) based on a dual-channel triboelectric nanogenerator was presented for a [...] Read more.
Accurate monitoring of motion and sleep states is critical for human health assessment, especially for a healthy life, early diagnosis of diseases, and medical care. In this work, a smart wearable sensor (SWS) based on a dual-channel triboelectric nanogenerator was presented for a real-time health monitoring system. The SWS can be worn on wrists, ankles, shoes, or other parts of the body and cloth, converting mechanical triggers into electrical output. By analyzing these signals, the SWS can precisely and constantly monitor and distinguish various motion states, including stepping, walking, running, and jumping. Based on the SWS, a fall-down alarm system and a sleep quality assessment system were constructed to provide personal healthcare monitoring and alert family members or doctors via communication devices. It is important for the healthy growth of the young and special patient groups, as well as for the health monitoring and medical care of the elderly and recovered patients. This work aimed to broaden the paths for remote biological movement status analysis and provide diversified perspectives for true-time and long-term health monitoring, simultaneously. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Powered Sensors and Micro-Systems)
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Review

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Review
Advances in Smart Sensing and Medical Electronics by Self-Powered Sensors Based on Triboelectric Nanogenerators
Micromachines 2021, 12(6), 698; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12060698 - 15 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 805
Abstract
With the rapid progress of artificial intelligence, humans are moving toward the era of the intelligent connection of all things. Therefore, the demand for sensors is drastically increasing with developing intelligent social applications. Traditional sensors must be triggered by an external power source [...] Read more.
With the rapid progress of artificial intelligence, humans are moving toward the era of the intelligent connection of all things. Therefore, the demand for sensors is drastically increasing with developing intelligent social applications. Traditional sensors must be triggered by an external power source and the energy consumption is high for equipment that is widely distributed and working intermittently, which is not conducive to developing sustainable green and healthy applications. However, self-powered sensors based on triboelectric nanogenerators (TENG) can autonomously harvest energy from the surrounding environment and convert this energy into electrical energy for storage. Sensors can also be self-powered without an external power supply, which is vital for smart cities, smart homes, smart transportation, environmental monitoring, wearable devices, and bio-medicine. This review mainly summarizes the working mechanism of TENG and the research progress of self-powered sensors based on TENG about the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, human–computer interaction, and intelligent medical fields in recent years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Powered Sensors and Micro-Systems)
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