Special Issue "Nanodevices for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Applications"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "A:Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Isabelle Huynen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics, Université catholique de Louvain, Place du Levant 3/L5.03.02, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
Tel. +32-10-47-23-08
Interests: microwave; nanotechnology; (nano)materials; modelling; measurements

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inspired initially by the work of Richard Feynman in 1959, and his famous talk “There is plenty of room at the bottom”, predicting that manipulating and controlling things on a small scale would have an enormous number of applications, nanoscience and nanotechnology moved during the 2000s from laboratory developments to daily life applications. The nanoworld, as understood today, is at the frontier between the level of atoms and molecules, governed by quantum physics, and the macroworld, where materials have bulk properties resulting from the assembly of billions of atoms. The general idea underlying the “nano” concept is that studying or rearranging matter at the molecular or atomic level will yield electrical, chemical, mechanical or optical properties that are superior to those of the bulk material.

On the other hand, the microwave and millimeter wave frequency range is nowadays widely exploited in a large variety of fields including (wireless) communications, security, radar, spectroscopy, but also astronomy and biomedical, to name a few.

This Special Issue focuses on the interaction between the nanoscale dimensions and centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. This interaction has been proven to be efficient for the design and fabrication of devices showing enhanced performance. Novel contributions are welcome in the field of devices based on nanoscaled geometries and materials. Applications cover, but not are limited to, electronics, sensors, signal processing, imaging and metrology, all exploiting nanoscale/nanotechnology at microwave and millimeter waves.

Contributions can take the form of short communications, regular or review papers.

Prof. Isabelle Huynen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanotechnology
  • Microwaves
  • Millimeter Wave
  • Nanoscopic Devices
  • Nanomaterials
  • Modelling
  • Fabrication
  • Measurement

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Miniature Switchable Millimeter-Wave BiCMOS Low-Noise Amplifier at 120/140 GHz Using an HBT Switch
Micromachines 2019, 10(10), 632; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10100632 - 21 Sep 2019
Abstract
A 120–140 GHz frequency-switchable, very compact low-noise amplifier (LNA) fabricated in a 0.13 µm SiGe:C BiCMOS technology is proposed. A single radio-frequency (RF) switch composed of three parallel hetero junction bipolar transistors (HBTs) in a common-collector configuration and a multimodal three-line microstrip structure [...] Read more.
A 120–140 GHz frequency-switchable, very compact low-noise amplifier (LNA) fabricated in a 0.13 µm SiGe:C BiCMOS technology is proposed. A single radio-frequency (RF) switch composed of three parallel hetero junction bipolar transistors (HBTs) in a common-collector configuration and a multimodal three-line microstrip structure in the input matching network are used to obtain a LNA chip of miniaturized size. A systematic design procedure is applied to obtain a perfectly balanced gain and noise figure in both frequency states (120 GHz and 140 GHz). The measured gain and noise figure are 14.2/14.2 dB and 8.2/8.2 dB at 120/140 GHz respectively, in very good agreement with circuit/electromagnetic co-simulations. The LNA chip and core areas are 0.197 mm2 and 0.091 mm2, respectively, which supposes an area reduction of 23.4% and 15.2% compared to other LNAs reported in this frequency band. The experimental results validate the design procedure and its analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodevices for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Tin Dioxide Thin Film with UV-enhanced Acetone Detection in Microwave Frequency Range
Micromachines 2019, 10(9), 574; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10090574 - 30 Aug 2019
Abstract
In this paper, the UV illumination effect for microwave gas sensors based on the tin dioxide was verified. A UV LED with emission wavelength close to the absorption edge of the SnO2 gas-sensing layer was selected as the UV source. The developed [...] Read more.
In this paper, the UV illumination effect for microwave gas sensors based on the tin dioxide was verified. A UV LED with emission wavelength close to the absorption edge of the SnO2 gas-sensing layer was selected as the UV source. The developed gas sensors were tested under exposure to acetone in the 0–200 ppm range at room temperature. The sensor’s complex reflection coefficient corresponding to target gas concentration was measured with the use of a five-port reflectometer system exhibiting enhanced uncertainty distribution, which allows for the detection of low gas concentration. The UV illumination significantly emphasizes the sensors’ response in terms of both magnitude and phase for low gas concentrations, in contrast to previously reported results, in which only the reflection coefficient’s phase was affected. The highest responses were obtained for modulated UV illumination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodevices for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Experimental Microwave Complex Conductivity Extraction of Vertically Aligned MWCNT Bundles for Microwave Subwavelength Antenna Design
Micromachines 2019, 10(9), 566; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10090566 - 27 Aug 2019
Abstract
This paper reports the extraction of electrical impedance at microwave frequencies of vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (VA MWCNT) bundles/forests grown on a silicon substrate. Dedicated resonating devices were designed for antenna application, operating around 10 GHz and benefiting from natural inductive/capacitive behavior [...] Read more.
This paper reports the extraction of electrical impedance at microwave frequencies of vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (VA MWCNT) bundles/forests grown on a silicon substrate. Dedicated resonating devices were designed for antenna application, operating around 10 GHz and benefiting from natural inductive/capacitive behavior or complex conductivity in the microwave domain. As obtained from S-parameters measurements, the capacitive and inductive behaviors of VA MWCNT bundles were deduced from device frequency resonance shift. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodevices for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Fabrication of Microwave Devices Based on Magnetic Nanowires Using a Laser-Assisted Process
Micromachines 2019, 10(7), 475; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10070475 - 16 Jul 2019
Abstract
This paper compares two laser-assisted processes developed by the authors for the fabrication of microwave devices based on nanowire arrays loaded inside porous alumina templates. Pros and cons of each process are discussed in terms of accuracy, reproducibility and ease of fabrication. A [...] Read more.
This paper compares two laser-assisted processes developed by the authors for the fabrication of microwave devices based on nanowire arrays loaded inside porous alumina templates. Pros and cons of each process are discussed in terms of accuracy, reproducibility and ease of fabrication. A comparison with lithography technique is also provided. The efficiency of the laser-assisted process is demonstrated through the realization of substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) based devices. A Nanowired SIW line is firstly presented. It operates between 8.5 and 17 GHz, corresponding to the first and second cut-off frequency of the waveguide, respectively. Next, a Nanowired SIW isolator is demonstrated. It shows a nonreciprocal isolation of 12 dB (corresponding to 4.4 dB/cm), observed in absence of a DC magnetic field, and achieved through an adequate positioning of ferromagnetic nanowires inside the waveguide cavity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodevices for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Design and Performance of a J Band MEMS Switch
Micromachines 2019, 10(7), 467; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10070467 - 13 Jul 2019
Abstract
This paper presents a novel J band (220–325 GHz) MEMS switch design. The equivalent circuits, the major parameters, capacitance, inductance and resistance in the circuit were extracted and calculated quantitatively to carry out the radio frequency analysis. In addition, the mechanical property of [...] Read more.
This paper presents a novel J band (220–325 GHz) MEMS switch design. The equivalent circuits, the major parameters, capacitance, inductance and resistance in the circuit were extracted and calculated quantitatively to carry out the radio frequency analysis. In addition, the mechanical property of the switch structure is analyzed, and the switching voltage is obtained. With the designed parameters, the MEMS switch is fabricated. The measurement results are in good agreement with simulation results, and the switch is actuated under a voltage of ~30 V. More importantly, the switch has achieved a low insertion loss of ~1.2 dB at 220 GHz and <~4 dB from 220 GHz to 270 GHz in the “UP” state, and isolation of ~16 dB from 220 GHz to 320 GHz in the “DOWN” state. Such switch shows great potential in the integration for terahertz components. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodevices for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
A Stripline-Based Planar Wideband Feed for High-Gain Antennas with Partially Reflecting Superstructure
Micromachines 2019, 10(5), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10050308 - 07 May 2019
Abstract
This paper presents a new planar feeding structure for wideband resonant-cavity antennas (RCAs). The feeding structure consists of two stacked dielectric slabs with an air-gap in between. A U-shaped slot, etched in the top metal-cladding over the upper dielectric slab, is fed by [...] Read more.
This paper presents a new planar feeding structure for wideband resonant-cavity antennas (RCAs). The feeding structure consists of two stacked dielectric slabs with an air-gap in between. A U-shaped slot, etched in the top metal-cladding over the upper dielectric slab, is fed by a planar stripline printed on the back side of the dielectric slab. The lower dielectric slab backed by a ground plane, is used to reduce back radiation. To validate the wideband performance of the new structure, in an RCA configuration, it was integrated with a wideband all-dielectric single-layer partially reflecting superstructure (PRS) with a transverse permittivity gradient (TPG). The single-layer RCA fed by the U-slot feeding structure demonstrated a peak directivity of 18.5 dBi with a 3 dB directivity bandwidth of 32%. An RCA prototype was fabricated and experimental results are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodevices for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
A 135-190 GHz Broadband Self-Biased Frequency Doubler using Four-Anode Schottky Diodes
Micromachines 2019, 10(4), 277; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10040277 - 25 Apr 2019
Abstract
This paper describes the design and demonstration of a 135–190 GHz self-biased broadband frequency doubler based on planar Schottky diodes. Unlike traditional bias schemes, the diodes are biased in resistive mode by a self-bias resistor; thus, no additional bias voltage is needed for [...] Read more.
This paper describes the design and demonstration of a 135–190 GHz self-biased broadband frequency doubler based on planar Schottky diodes. Unlike traditional bias schemes, the diodes are biased in resistive mode by a self-bias resistor; thus, no additional bias voltage is needed for the doubler. The Schottky diodes in this verification are micron-scaled devices with an anode area of 6.6 μm2 and an epitaxial layer thickness of 0.26 μm. For accurate design of the doubler, the 3D-EM model of the Schottky diode is built up to extract the parasitic parameters induced by the diode package when frequency rises up to the terahertz band. In order to implement broadband working, input waveguide steps, output suspended microstrip steps, and output probe with bias filter are all used as matching elements for impedance matching. Measured results show that the doubler exhibits a 3 dB bandwidth of 34% from 135 GHz to 190 GHz, with a conversion efficiency of above 4% when supplied with 100 mW of input power. A 17.8 mW peak output power with a 10.2% efficiency was measured at 166 GHz when the input power was 174 mW. The measured results agree well with the simulated results, which indicates that the self-bias scheme for Schottky diode-based frequency multipliers is feasible and effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodevices for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Applications)
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