Special Issue "Alloy Design"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Russell Goodall
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
Tel. +44 114 222 5977
Interests: the development of new alloys; High Entropy Alloys; alloys with silver; the processing, properties and applications of open-celled porous metals; mechanical properties of materials
Dr. Zhaoyuan Leong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
Interests: the application and design of alloys; hardfacing alloys; magnetic thin films and structural materials; semi-empirical models by quantum mechanics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The practice of alloy design has existed for thousands of years. The theoretical basis took longer to arise but dates back to at least the work of Hume-Rothery, with much development in the intervening period. The process of alloy design as applied currently covers many approaches, encompassing iterative “tinkering” with compositions, computational approaches using electronic structure or thermodynamic parameters, and many individual or in-house strategies. Though very different methods, all are united by having a set goal or goals for the alloys created, and using an iterative, defined method, requiring knowledge of the behavior sought, to reach it.

The breadth of strategies employed is reflective of the breadth in modern metallurgy. As well as the established alloy families, including extremely highly engineered examples such as TRIP/TWIP steels and nickel superalloys, recent years have seen the emergence of new concepts, including the ideas of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and High Entropy Alloys (HEAs). The successive untethering from the ideas of a defined structure and a dominant solvent that these systems have introduced has further widened the scope within which alloy design can operate, opening up further possibilities to familiar topics such as microstructural engineering, tuning of functional properties, mechanical properties etc.

This Special Issue of Metals will encompass all of these areas, giving a forum for reporting research on the development of new alloys, compositions, and treatments with the aim of improving the metallic materials available for any application. We would like to encourage the submission of papers reporting work where a directed, knowledge-driven approach is employed to yield information about novel metallic materials, discussing either the methodology itself or the materials created.

Dr. Russell Goodall
Dr. Zhaoyuan Leong
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Alloy design and development
  • Microstructure engineering
  • Functional and mechanical properties
  • Ab-initio
  • CALPHAD
  • Combinatorial metallurgy
  • Semi-empirical
  • Solid solutions
  • Intermetallics
  • Amorphous

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Microstructures, Tensile Properties and Creep Characteristics of as-Extruded AZ91 Magnesium Alloy Containing Si, Ca and Rare Earth Elements
Metals 2019, 9(9), 954; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9090954 - 30 Aug 2019
Abstract
Wrought AZ (Mg–Al–Zn) series alloys have attracted lots of researches, due to low cost, high strength and good formability. Few researches focus on creep characteristics of wrought AZ series alloys, which might be of significance to extensive use of low-cost wrought Mg–Al based [...] Read more.
Wrought AZ (Mg–Al–Zn) series alloys have attracted lots of researches, due to low cost, high strength and good formability. Few researches focus on creep characteristics of wrought AZ series alloys, which might be of significance to extensive use of low-cost wrought Mg–Al based alloy at elevated temperature. The microstructures, tensile properties and creep characteristics of as-extruded Mg-9Al-Zn-0.5RE-0.5Ca-0.5Si (wt.%, named AZXSE91000) alloy were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), tensile tests and tensile creep tests (40–100 MPa, 125–150 °C). The as-extruded AZXSE91000 alloy exhibited good tensile strength both at room temperature and elevated temperature. The co-addition of Si, Ca and rare earth elements can improve the heat resistance of as-extruded AZ91 alloy resulting from fragmented heat-resistant particles hindering grain boundaries sliding. The steady creep rates of as-extruded AZXSE91000 alloy can be comparable with that of as-cast AZ91 alloy under similar experimental conditions. Dislocation climbing and grain boundary slip should dominantly contribute to the creep of as-extruded AZXSE91000 alloy. The asymmetric discontinuous precipitation in crept samples revealed that diffusion played an unneglected role during the creep process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alloy Design)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimization of Graphite Morphology in Mottled Nihard Cast Irons Inoculated with Feb and Manufactured by Centrifugal Casting
Metals 2018, 8(5), 293; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8050293 - 24 Apr 2018
Abstract
The present research was focused on the identification of manufacturing factors that have an active influence on the graphite phase formation in Nihard cast irons inoculated with FeB, constituting the outer layer of duplex work rolls. These rolls are used in the finishing [...] Read more.
The present research was focused on the identification of manufacturing factors that have an active influence on the graphite phase formation in Nihard cast irons inoculated with FeB, constituting the outer layer of duplex work rolls. These rolls are used in the finishing stands of hot-strip steel mills where the following are desired: (a) between 2.5 and 4 vol % of graphite; (b) homogeneous graphite distribution across the layer section; and, (c) a reasonable high number of graphite particles across the layer. The research methodology that followed consisted of the application of a saturated design of experiments (DOE), with seven factors, eight experiments, and resolution III. The analyzed responses obtained by quantitative metallographic techniques were: the volume fraction of graphite, Vv; the number of counts per unit area of graphite, NA; and the graphite morphology across the layer thickness. Increasing the addition of FeB from 6 to 10 kg/T reduced the graphite volume fraction and the count number, but had no influence on its morphology. However, an increase of the liquidus temperature from 1225–1230 to 1250–1255 °C, and an increase in the amount of SiCaMn added to the ladle from 0.3 to 0.6 kg/T produced the desired compact graphite morphology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alloy Design)
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