Special Issue "Seaweeds Metabolites"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Nathalie Bourgougnon
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratoire de Biotechnologie et Chimie Marines, Université Bretagne Sud, France
Interests: phycology, marine molecules, extraction eco-friendly processes, antiviral agents, SAR studies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Gilles Bedoux
Website
Guest Editor
Université Bretagne Sud, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie et Chimie Marines
Interests: Seaweed; Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture; Environmental impact; Biorefinery and eco-extraction; Advanced fractionation and structural analysis and imaging; Functional food ingredients; Defense molecules; Biological activities
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Macroalgae or seaweeds are mainly used worlwide as a raw material for human nutrition and for the phycocolloid industry. Because they grow in complex habitats, they are sources of specific bioactive metabolites not found in other organisms. These diverse compounds produced under natural or controlled environments could be used in various industrial domains.

Facing challenges like feeding the world’s population while reducing the use of antibiotics and phytosanitary products, seaweed-derived nutrients and bioactive compounds have potential as functional food ingredients as they possess advantageous effects to prevent chronic diseases and create health benefits such as antitumoral and anti-inflammatory activity.

To reduce the production cost of new active compounds, an integrated sustainable biorefinery approach facilitating the extraction of different products from the same biomass is of high importance. Another important aspect to take into account is seaweed biomass production. The use of aquaculture wastewater as nutrients for seaweed is recognized as the most promising proposal for reducing the negative impacts of aquaculture in the surrounding environment, and to produce algae biomass.

This Special Issue focuses on novel information from present research on seaweed metabolites. Particular attention will be paid to the following innovative track explorations:

  • the impact of growth conditions (including integrated multi-trophic aquaculture) on seaweed metabolites
  • biorefinery and eco-friendly processes to provide strategies for the release of metabolites
  • advanced metabolite fractionation, the identification of novel bioactive compounds by structural analysis and imaging including high screening content analysis and metabolomic
  • innovative methods for the determination of biological activities, the study of mechanisms and the relation between chemical structure and activity

Prof. Nathalie Bourgougnon
Dr. Gilles Bedoux
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cultivation
  • Aquaculture
  • Biorefinery
  • Eco-extraction
  • Fractionation
  • Structural analysis
  • Biological activity
  • Biosynthesis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Production of Active Poly- and Oligosaccharidic Fractions from Ulva sp. by Combining Enzyme-Assisted Extraction (EAE) and Depolymerization
Metabolites 2019, 9(9), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9090182 - 12 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Data on fractionation and depolymerization of the matrix ulvan polysaccharides, and studies on the biological activities on skin cells, are very scarce. In this work, crude ulvans were produced by using EAE (enzyme-assisted extraction) and compared to maceration (an established procedure). After different [...] Read more.
Data on fractionation and depolymerization of the matrix ulvan polysaccharides, and studies on the biological activities on skin cells, are very scarce. In this work, crude ulvans were produced by using EAE (enzyme-assisted extraction) and compared to maceration (an established procedure). After different fractionation procedures—ethanolic precipitation, dialysis, or ammonium sulfate precipitation—the biochemical composition showed that EAE led to an increased content in ulvans. Coupling EAE to sulfate ammonium precipitation led to protein enrichment. Oligosaccharides were obtained by using radical depolymerization by H2O2 and ion-exchange resin depolymerization. Sulfate groups were partially cleaved during these chemical treatments. The potential bioactivity of the fractions was assessed using a lipoxygenase inhibition assay for anti-inflammatory activity and a WST-1 assay for human dermal fibroblast viability and proliferation. All ulvans extracts, poly- and oligosaccharidic fractions from EAE, expanded the fibroblast proliferation rate up to 62%. Our research emphasizes the potential use of poly- and oligosaccharidic fractions of Ulva sp. for further development in cosmetic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seaweeds Metabolites)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Marine Algae Metabolites as Promising Therapeutics for the Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS
Metabolites 2019, 9(5), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9050087 - 02 May 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
This review presents an analysis of works devoted to the anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity of algae metabolites—sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidans, carrageenans), lectins, laminarans, and polyphenols. Despite the presence of a significant number of antiretroviral drugs, the development of new therapeutic and prophylactic agents [...] Read more.
This review presents an analysis of works devoted to the anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity of algae metabolites—sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidans, carrageenans), lectins, laminarans, and polyphenols. Despite the presence of a significant number of antiretroviral drugs, the development of new therapeutic and prophylactic agents against this infection remains very urgent problem. This is due to the variability of HIV, the absence of an animal model (except monkeys) and natural immunity to this virus and the toxicity of therapeutic agents and their high cost. In this regard, the need for new therapeutic approaches and broad-spectrum drugs, which in addition to antiviral effects can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects, and to which the minimum resistance of HIV strains would be formed. These requirements meet the biologically active substances of marine algae. The results of experimental and clinical studies conducted in vitro and in vivo are presented, and the issues of the anti-HIV activity of these compounds are considered depending on their structural features. On the whole, the presented data prove the high efficiency of seaweed metabolites and justify the possibility of their use as a potential basis for the development of new drugs with a wide spectrum of activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seaweeds Metabolites)
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