Special Issue "Invertebrate or Macroalgae-Associated Microbiome: A New Source of Bioactive Compounds with Therapeutical, Biotechnological Applications"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nathalie Bourgougnon
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Laboratoire de Biotechnologie et Chimie Marines, Université Bretagne Sud, 56017 Vannes, France
Interests: phycology; marine molecules; extraction eco-friendly processes; antiviral agents; SAR studies
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surfaces immersed in the marine environment are rapidly colonised by bacteria and then by other micro-organisms (fungi, viruses, archaea and microalgae), leading to the formation of diverse, complex, three-dimensional structures called biofilms. Macroalgae and invertebrates such as tunicates, cnidarians, bryozoans, and sponges are no exception to this phenomenon. Since they are fixed, they present complex surface communities of epibiotic micro-organisms. The host microbiota, or ″holobiont″, rich in chemical, physical and biological interactions, regulates the relations between the basibiont and its epibionts. Ranging from mutualistic to commensal and parasitic, the microbiota can be fundamental or detrimental to the functioning of the host. It is now known that many of the bioactive compounds previously attributed to some invertebrates or macroalgae were in fact produced or metabolized by their associated micro-organisms. Environmental stress in an increasingly changing ocean may disturb these complex mutualistic relations.

This Special Issue focuses on new information from present research on macroalgae or invertebrate‐associated microbiota (bacteria, fungi, virus) as interesting sources of compounds with therapeutic and biotechnological potential.

Special attention will be paid to the interaction between the microbiome and host, host chemical defence strategies, the secretion and role of secondary metabolites, the secretion of antifouling chemicals and antibiotics, the extraction and identification of biomolecules, and seaweed disease control in aquaculture.

Prof. Nathalie Bourgougnon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine seaweeds
  • marine invertebrates
  • microbiome
  • epibiosis
  • bacteria
  • fungi
  • virus
  • quorum sensing
  • holobiont
  • defence molecule
  • metagenomes
  • marine biotechnology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Review
Symbiotic Associations in Ascidians: Relevance for Functional Innovation and Bioactive Potential
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(7), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19070370 - 26 Jun 2021
Viewed by 630
Abstract
Associations between different organisms have been extensively described in terrestrial and marine environments. These associations are involved in roles as diverse as nutrient exchanges, shelter or adaptation to adverse conditions. Ascidians are widely dispersed marine invertebrates associated to invasive behaviours. Studying their microbiomes [...] Read more.
Associations between different organisms have been extensively described in terrestrial and marine environments. These associations are involved in roles as diverse as nutrient exchanges, shelter or adaptation to adverse conditions. Ascidians are widely dispersed marine invertebrates associated to invasive behaviours. Studying their microbiomes has interested the scientific community, mainly due to its potential for bioactive compounds production—e.g., ET-73 (trabectedin, Yondelis), an anticancer drug. However, these symbiotic interactions embrace several environmental and biological functions with high ecological relevance, inspiring diverse biotechnological applications. We thoroughly reviewed microbiome studies (microscopic to metagenomic approaches) of around 171 hosts, worldwide dispersed, occurring at different domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria, Eukarya), to illuminate the functions and bioactive potential of associated organisms in ascidians. Associations with Bacteria are the most prevalent, namely with Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes phyla. The microbiomes of ascidians belonging to Aplousobranchia order have been the most studied. The integration of worldwide studies characterizing ascidians’ microbiome composition revealed several functions including UV protection, bioaccumulation of heavy metals and defense against fouling or predators through production of natural products, chemical signals or competition. The critical assessment and characterization of these communities is extremely valuable to comprehend their biological/ecological role and biotechnological potential. Full article
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Review
Ecological and Industrial Implications of Dynamic Seaweed-Associated Microbiota Interactions
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(12), 641; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18120641 - 14 Dec 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1603
Abstract
Seaweeds are broadly distributed and represent an important source of secondary metabolites (e.g., halogenated compounds, polyphenols) eliciting various pharmacological activities and playing a relevant ecological role in the anti-epibiosis. Importantly, host (as known as basibiont such as algae)–microbe (as known as epibiont such [...] Read more.
Seaweeds are broadly distributed and represent an important source of secondary metabolites (e.g., halogenated compounds, polyphenols) eliciting various pharmacological activities and playing a relevant ecological role in the anti-epibiosis. Importantly, host (as known as basibiont such as algae)–microbe (as known as epibiont such as bacteria) interaction (as known as halobiont) is a driving force for coevolution in the marine environment. Nevertheless, halobionts may be fundamental (harmless) or detrimental (harmful) to the functioning of the host. In addition to biotic factors, abiotic factors (e.g., pH, salinity, temperature, nutrients) regulate halobionts. Spatiotemporal and functional exploration of such dynamic interactions appear crucial. Indeed, environmental stress in a constantly changing ocean may disturb complex mutualistic relations, through mechanisms involving host chemical defense strategies (e.g., secretion of secondary metabolites and antifouling chemicals by quorum sensing). It is worth mentioning that many of bioactive compounds, such as terpenoids, previously attributed to macroalgae are in fact produced or metabolized by their associated microorganisms (e.g., bacteria, fungi, viruses, parasites). Eventually, recent metagenomics analyses suggest that microbes may have acquired seaweed associated genes because of increased seaweed in diets. This article retrospectively reviews pertinent studies on the spatiotemporal and functional seaweed-associated microbiota interactions which can lead to the production of bioactive compounds with high antifouling, theranostic, and biotechnological potential. Full article
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