Special Issue "Metabolism and Reproduction"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrinology and Clinical Metabolic Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jennifer W. Hill
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research, College of Medicine, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43614, USA
Interests: reproduction and food intake; the hypothalamic control of energy balance; leptin and insulin intracellular signaling; central effects of sex steroids

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

‘Metabolism and Reproductive Success’ covers original research papers and reviews on all aspects of the connections between fertility, growth, energy expenditure, and survival, with a particular focus on infertility linked to metabolic dysfunction. This section covers the trade-offs between fecundity, growth, and longevity faced by organisms, from C. elegans to vertebrates. In addition, it includes human disorders of glucose dysregulation, caloric insufficiency, and obesity that are associated with infertile states. Finally, recent advances in the understanding of the cellular and intracellular mechanisms involved in the infertility of peripheral and central origin are also covered.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Novel hypothalamic mechanisms leading to altered GnRH release and pubertal timing
  • The role of the gut microbiota in the infertility and insulin resistance seen in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).
  • Mechanisms of evolutionary, ecological, or selective breeding pressures altering fecundity, lactation, aging, and lifespan across species
  • Investigation and modeling of metabolic rate variations within species and evaluation of the pace-of-life hypothesis
  • The impact of insulin and growth-hormone related signaling on the gonads and reproductive axis

Dr. Jennifer W. Hill
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metabolic rate
  • infertility
  • puberty
  • reproductive aging
  • hypothalamus
  • energy expenditure
  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • fecundity
  • insulin
  • growth factors
  • longevity
  • gonadal
  • ovary
  • GnRH
  • kisspeptin
  • glucose
  • microbiota
  • pcos
  • breeding
  • ecological pressure
  • pace of life
  • sex hormones

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Profile of Bile Acid Metabolomics in the Follicular Fluid of PCOS Patients
Metabolites 2021, 11(12), 845; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11120845 - 06 Dec 2021
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Abstract
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex heterogeneous endocrine disease affected by genetic and environmental factors. In this manuscript, we aimed to describe the composition of bile acid metabolomics in the follicular fluid (FF) of PCOS. The FF was collected from 31 control [...] Read more.
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex heterogeneous endocrine disease affected by genetic and environmental factors. In this manuscript, we aimed to describe the composition of bile acid metabolomics in the follicular fluid (FF) of PCOS. The FF was collected from 31 control patients and 35 PCOS patients diagnosed according to the Rotterdam diagnostic criteria. The Bile Acid Assay Kit and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) were used in this study to detect the total bile acid and 24 bile acid metabolites. Glycocholic acid (GC3A), taurocholic acid (TCA), glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA), and chenodeoxycholic acid-3-β-D-glucuronide (CDCA-3Gln) were elevated in the PCOS group. GCDCA was positively correlated with the serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (r = 0.3787, p = 0.0017) and luteinizing hormone (LH) (r = 0.2670, p = 0.0302). The level of CDCA-3Gln also rose with the increase in antral follicle counts (AFC) (r = 0.3247, p = 0.0078). Compared with the control group, the primary bile acids (p = 0.0207) and conjugated bile acids (p = 0.0283) were elevated in PCOS. For the first time, our study described the changes in bile acid metabolomics in the FF of PCOS patients, suggesting that bile acids may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolism and Reproduction)
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Review

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Review
Sperm-Guiding Unconventional Prostaglandins in C. elegans: Synthesis and Signaling
by , and
Metabolites 2021, 11(12), 853; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11120853 (registering DOI) - 08 Dec 2021
Abstract
Prostaglandins comprise a family of lipid signaling molecules derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids and are involved in a wide array of biological processes, including fertilization. Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (a.k.a. cyclooxygenase or Cox) initiates prostaglandin synthesis from 20-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid. [...] Read more.
Prostaglandins comprise a family of lipid signaling molecules derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids and are involved in a wide array of biological processes, including fertilization. Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (a.k.a. cyclooxygenase or Cox) initiates prostaglandin synthesis from 20-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid. Oocytes of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) have been shown to secrete sperm-guidance cues prostaglandins, independent of Cox enzymes. Both prostaglandin synthesis and signal transduction in C. elegans are environmentally modulated pathways that regulate sperm guidance to the fertilization site. Environmental factors such as food triggers insulin and TGF-β secretion and their levels regulate tissue-specific prostaglandin synthesis in C. elegans. This novel PG pathway is abundant in mouse and human ovarian follicular fluid, where their functions, mechanism of synthesis and pathways remain to be established. Given the importance of prostaglandins in reproductive processes, a better understanding of how diets and other environmental factors influence their synthesis and function may lead to new strategies towards improving fertility in mammals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolism and Reproduction)
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Review
Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Relationship between Obesity and Male Infertility
Metabolites 2021, 11(12), 840; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11120840 - 04 Dec 2021
Viewed by 276
Abstract
In recent decades, the worldwide prevalence of obesity has risen dramatically and is currently estimated to be around 20%. Obesity is linked to an increased risk of comorbidities and premature mortality. Several studies have shown that obesity negatively impacts male fertility through various [...] Read more.
In recent decades, the worldwide prevalence of obesity has risen dramatically and is currently estimated to be around 20%. Obesity is linked to an increased risk of comorbidities and premature mortality. Several studies have shown that obesity negatively impacts male fertility through various mechanisms. This review aims to investigate the molecular mechanisms through which obesity impairs male reproduction, including obesity-associated hypogonadism and its effects on spermatogenesis, chronic inflammation, and oxidative stress. Obesity negatively impacts both conventional and biofunctional sperm parameters, and it also induces epigenetic changes that can be transferred to offspring. Moreover, obesity-related diseases are linked to a dysregulation of adipocyte function and micro-environmental inflammatory processes. The dysregulated adipokines significantly influence insulin signaling, and they may also have a detrimental effect on testicular function. Sirtuins can also play an important role in inflammatory and metabolic responses in obese patients. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that are involved in obesity-induced male infertility could increase our ability to identify novel targets for the prevention and treatment of obesity and its related consequences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolism and Reproduction)
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