Special Issue "Trafficking of Membrane Receptors 2015"

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375). This special issue belongs to the section "Membrane Transport Phenomena".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Morten S. Nielsen

Institut for Medicinsk Biokemi, Ole Worms Allé, Bygn. 170, Universitetsparken, 8000 Århus C, Denmark
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +45 861 31160
Interests: receptors; endocytosis; intracellular trafficking; lipoprotein; lipase
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Oddmund Bakke

Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo 0316, Norway
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +47 2285 5787

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine was awarded to Dr. James E. Rothman, Dr. Randy W. Schekman and Dr. Thomas C. Südhof for their ground-breaking research concerning the regulation of vesicular traffic in eukaryotic cells. The vesicular system is used by membrane receptors for cellular trafficking; such trafficking includes exocytosis, endocytosis, transport in the endo-lysosomal system. After the receptors are incorporated into vesicles, subcellular trafficking including fusion, fission between vesicles, tubular structures from trans Golgi-network and endosomes and these complex events are all mediated by several adaptor and coat proteins (e.g., the Adaptor Complexes 1 to 4, the retromer complex, RAB proteins, and many others). Furthermore, active signaling within the endosomal pathway is of special interest for us. Also, asymmetric trafficking in polarized cells (e.g., epithelial and endothelial cells and neurons), adds an additional layer of complexity.

For this Special Issue of Membranes—“Trafficking of Membrane Receptors”, we encourage you to submit manuscripts discussing how the trafficking of recycling, retrograde-sorted, and other receptors is regulated in cells.

Dr. Morten S. Nielsen
Prof. Dr. Oddmund Bakke
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • membrane receptors
  • anterograde traffic
  • retrograde traffic
  • endocytosis
  • exocytosis
  • adaptor proteins
  • coat proteins

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor
Membranes 2015, 5(2), 197-213; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5020197
Received: 20 April 2015 / Accepted: 5 May 2015 / Published: 12 May 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (8046 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation [...] Read more.
The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trafficking of Membrane Receptors 2015)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters
Membranes 2015, 5(3), 288-306; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5030288
Received: 20 May 2015 / Accepted: 29 June 2015 / Published: 6 July 2015
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (392 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network [...] Read more.
Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer’s disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trafficking of Membrane Receptors 2015)
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Open AccessReview Endocytosis and Trafficking of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Potential Role of Short Sequence Motifs
Membranes 2015, 5(3), 253-287; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5030253
Received: 18 April 2015 / Revised: 25 June 2015 / Accepted: 25 June 2015 / Published: 3 July 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (534 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The targeted endocytosis and redistribution of transmembrane receptors among membrane-bound subcellular organelles are vital for their correct signaling and physiological functions. Membrane receptors committed for internalization and trafficking pathways are sorted into coated vesicles. Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and [...] Read more.
The targeted endocytosis and redistribution of transmembrane receptors among membrane-bound subcellular organelles are vital for their correct signaling and physiological functions. Membrane receptors committed for internalization and trafficking pathways are sorted into coated vesicles. Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) bind to guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and elicit the generation of intracellular second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which lowers blood pressure and incidence of heart failure. After ligand binding, the receptor is rapidly internalized, sequestrated, and redistributed into intracellular locations. Thus, NPRA is considered a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular locations through its lifetime. The utilization of pharmacologic and molecular perturbants has helped in delineating the pathways of endocytosis, trafficking, down-regulation, and degradation of membrane receptors in intact cells. This review describes the investigation of the mechanisms of internalization, trafficking, and redistribution of NPRA compared with other cell surface receptors from the plasma membrane into the cell interior. The roles of different short-signal peptide sequence motifs in the internalization and trafficking of other membrane receptors have been briefly reviewed and their potential significance in the internalization and trafficking of NPRA is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trafficking of Membrane Receptors 2015)
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Open AccessReview Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163
Membranes 2015, 5(2), 228-252; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5020228
Received: 4 May 2015 / Accepted: 11 June 2015 / Published: 23 June 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (271 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs [...] Read more.
In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trafficking of Membrane Receptors 2015)
Open AccessReview The Road not Taken: Less Traveled Roads from the TGN to the Plasma Membrane
Membranes 2015, 5(1), 84-98; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5010084
Received: 3 October 2014 / Accepted: 27 February 2015 / Published: 10 March 2015
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (605 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The trans-Golgi network functions in the distribution of cargo into different transport vesicles that are destined to endosomes, lysosomes and the plasma membrane. Over the years, it has become clear that more than one transport pathway promotes plasma membrane localization of proteins. In [...] Read more.
The trans-Golgi network functions in the distribution of cargo into different transport vesicles that are destined to endosomes, lysosomes and the plasma membrane. Over the years, it has become clear that more than one transport pathway promotes plasma membrane localization of proteins. In spite of the importance of temporal and spatial control of protein localization at the plasma membrane, the regulation of sorting into and the formation of different transport containers are still poorly understood. In this review different transport pathways, with a special emphasis on exomer-dependent transport, and concepts of regulation and sorting at the TGN are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trafficking of Membrane Receptors 2015)
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