Special Issue "Advances in Liquid Membranes"

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2014).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kyriakos D. Papadopoulos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA
Tel. +1-(504)-865-5826; Fax: +1-(504)-865-6744
Interests: engine tribology; engine lubricant tribological actions; anti-wear and anti-corrosion additives; overbased detergents and acid neutralization; lubricant formulation; new concepts for engine lubricants
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Isabel Coelhoso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: membrane separation processes, membrane contactors for process intensification, design of biopolymer membranes for biotechnology applications
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Clàudia Fontàs
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, The University of Girona, 17071 Girona, Spain
Tel. +34 606800581; Fax: +34 972 418 150
Interests: separation processes based on functionalized membranes; supported liquid membranes; polymer inclusion membranes; membrane systems for the clean-up of natural waters and industrial wastewaters; physico-chemical and electrical characterization of membranes; environmental and industrial sampling and analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Liquid membranes (LMs) are a well-known type of membranes that have been applied in different areas where separation or specific transport is needed. The selectivity of LMs is easily increased with the use of an appropriate carrier; the LMs become functionalized membranes that can be very specific for the separation of target solutes. Moreover, unlike many other separation processes, LMs are usually driven only by chemical forces, and hence can have low energy intensity in their operation.

The underlying technology required to utilize LMs for separating target solutes from aqueous solutions is relatively simple, and can be easily adapted to a range of applications. LMs are very versatile, and can be found in different configurations, such as supported liquid membranes (SLMs) and membrane contactors. These configurations have been applied for the recovery of valued or toxic metals, removal of organic compounds, gas separation and recovery of fermentation products, among others. In the configuration of emulsion liquid membranes (ELMs), they are used as storage and delivery vehicles of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics in the health sciences and the pharmaceutical industry. Membrane contactors are also gaining importance; these contactors can supply 20 to 100 times more surface area per volume than conventional extraction and absorption equipment.

However, in spite of the known advantages of using SLMs, one major drawback for industrial application is the SLMs’ instability: i.e., the liquid phase evaporates or may get easily displaced from the pores. One of the most interesting strategies for improving SLMs’ stability involves the use of ionic liquids, as these compounds have negligible vapor pressure.

We invite contributors to submit original research papers discussing the latest developments in liquid membrane-based processes for chemical, biological, and environmental applications.

Prof. Dr. Kyriakos D. Papadopoulos
Prof. Dr. Isabel Coelhoso
Prof. Dr. Clàudia Fontàs
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • liquid membranes
  • membrane contactors
  • membrane processes
  • ionic liquids
  • stability

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
A New Emulsion Liquid Membrane Based on a Palm Oil for the Extraction of Heavy Metals
Membranes 2015, 5(2), 168-179; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5020168 - 23 Apr 2015
Cited by 19
Abstract
The extraction efficiency of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from water has been investigated using a vegetable oil based emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) technique. The main purpose of this study was to create a novel ELM formulation by choosing a more environmentally friendly and non-toxic [...] Read more.
The extraction efficiency of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from water has been investigated using a vegetable oil based emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) technique. The main purpose of this study was to create a novel ELM formulation by choosing a more environmentally friendly and non-toxic diluent such as palm oil. The membrane phase so formulated includes the mobile carrier tri-n-octylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC), to facilitate the metal transport, and the hydrophilic surfactant Tween 80 to facilitate the dispersion of the ELM phase in the aqueous solution. Span 80 is used as surfactant and butanol as co-surfactant. Our results demonstrate that this novel ELM formulation, using the vegetable palm oil as diluent, is useful for the removal of hexavalent chromium with an efficiency of over 99% and is thus competitive with the already existing, yet less environmentally friendly, ELM formulations. This result was achieved with an optimal concentration of 0.1 M NaOH as stripping agent and an external phase pH of 0.5. Different water qualities have also been investigated showing that the type of water (deionized, distilled, or tap water) does not significantly influence the extraction rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Liquid Membranes)
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Open AccessArticle
Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes and Ion-Jelly® Membranes with [BMIM][DCA]: Comparison of Its Performance for CO2 Separation
Membranes 2015, 5(1), 13-21; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5010013 - 14 Jan 2015
Cited by 12
Abstract
In this work, a supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) was prepared by impregnating a PVDF membrane with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([BMIM][DCA]) ionic liquid. This membrane was tested for its permeability to pure gases (CO2, N2 and O2) and ideal [...] Read more.
In this work, a supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) was prepared by impregnating a PVDF membrane with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([BMIM][DCA]) ionic liquid. This membrane was tested for its permeability to pure gases (CO2, N2 and O2) and ideal selectivities were calculated. The SILM performance was also compared to that of Ion-Jelly® membranes, a new type of gelled membranes developed recently. It was found that the PVDF membrane presents permeabilities for pure gases similar or lower to those presented by the Ion-Jelly® membranes, but with increased ideal selectivities. This membrane presents also the highest ideal selectivity (73) for the separation of CO2 from N2 when compared with SILMs using the same PVDF support but with different ionic liquids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Liquid Membranes)
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Open AccessArticle
Polymeric Pseudo-Liquid Membranes from Poly(N-oleylacrylamide)
Membranes 2014, 4(2), 210-226; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes4020210 - 30 Apr 2014
Cited by 2
Abstract
A polymeric pseudo-liquid membrane (PPLM) was constructed from poly(N-oleylacrylamide) (PC18AAm), which exhibited a rubbery state under membrane transport conditions and used as the membrane matrix. In the present study, dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) and dibenzo-21-crown-7 (DB21C7) were adopted as transporters for alkali metal [...] Read more.
A polymeric pseudo-liquid membrane (PPLM) was constructed from poly(N-oleylacrylamide) (PC18AAm), which exhibited a rubbery state under membrane transport conditions and used as the membrane matrix. In the present study, dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) and dibenzo-21-crown-7 (DB21C7) were adopted as transporters for alkali metal ions. KCl was adopted as a model substrate for DB18C6 and CsCl the latter. Chiral transporter, O-allyl-N-(9-anthracenylmethyl)cinchonidinium bromide (AAMC) was used as a transporter for chiral separation of a racemic mixture of phenylglycine (Phegly). The l-somer was transported in preference to the antipode. The present study revealed that PPLMs are applicable to membrane transport, such as metal ion transport and chiral separation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Liquid Membranes)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes
Membranes 2015, 5(2), 150-167; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes5020150 - 27 Mar 2015
Cited by 8
Abstract
Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and [...] Read more.
Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs) look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s) plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Liquid Membranes)
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