Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 12th Conference of the Aseanian Membrane Society (AMS12)"

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jonggeon Jegal

Guest Editor
Research Center for Bio-Based Chemistry, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Ulsan 44429, Korea
Interests: water treatment membranes; pervaporation membranes; synthesis of membrane materials; noble membrane fabrication
Prof. Jin Yong Park
Website
Guest Editor
Dept. of Environmental Sciences & Biotechnology, Hallym University, Gangwon 24252, Korea
Interests: water treatment engineering; membrane separation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Hideto Matsuyama
Website
Guest Editor
Center for Membrane and Film Technology, Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Kobe University, Rokkodai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501, Japan
Interests: chemical engineering; membrane technology; separation technology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Abdul Latif Ahmad
Website
Guest Editor
School of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Nibong Tebal, Penang, 14300, Malaysia
Interests: water/wastewater treatment; air pollution; energy; adsorption
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. B. Chakravorty
Website
Guest Editor
Managing Director, Genesis Membrane Sep. Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai, India
Interests: various industrial applications of membranes

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

On behalf of the organizing committee of the conference, we are pleased to welcome you to the 12th Conference of the Aseanian Membrane Society (AMS12), to be held in Jeju, Korea, on 2–5 July 2019. For more information on AMS 12, please visit the following link: http://www.ams12.org/index.php

AMS 12 is one of our most important conferences, bringing members together from around the world to share professional experiences, expand professional networks, and receive updates on the latest advances in the field of membrane sciences and technology. The main topics will be as follows:

  • Water and wastewater treatment (MF, UF, and MBR)
  • Desalination (RO, NF, FO, and CDI)
  • Solvent separation and dehydration (PV, VP, and MD)
  • Gas separation
  • Energy conversion and storage
  • Biomedical and bioseparation
  • Resources recovery
  • Membrane reactors
  • Advanced membrane processes
  • Novel membranes and materials
  • Membrane characterization

We are cordially inviting you to join us at the conference and also to submit your manuscript to this Special Issue.

Dr. Jonggeon Jegal
Prof. Jin Yong Park
Prof. Hideto Matsuyama
Prof. Abdul Latif Ahmad
Dr. B. Chakravorty
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Monitoring the Interfacial Polymerization of Piperazine and Trimesoyl Chloride with Hydrophilic Interlayer or Macromolecular Additive by In Situ FT-IR Spectroscopy
by Xi Yang
Membranes 2020, 10(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10010012 - 07 Jan 2020
Abstract
The interfacial polymerization (IP) of piperazine (PIP) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC) has been extensively utilized to synthesize nanofiltration (NF) membranes. However, it is still a huge challenge to monitor the IP reaction, because of the fast reaction rate and the formed ultra-thin film. [...] Read more.
The interfacial polymerization (IP) of piperazine (PIP) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC) has been extensively utilized to synthesize nanofiltration (NF) membranes. However, it is still a huge challenge to monitor the IP reaction, because of the fast reaction rate and the formed ultra-thin film. Herein, two effective strategies were applied to reduce the IP reaction rate: (1) the introduction of hydrophilic interlayers between the porous substrate and the formed polyamide layer, and (2) the addition of macromolecular additives in the aqueous solution of PIP. As a result, in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was firstly used to monitor the IP reaction of PIP/TMC with hydrophilic interlayers or macromolecular additives in the aqueous solution of PIP. Moreover, the formed polyamide layer growth on the substrate was studied in a real-time manner. The in situ FT-IR experimental results confirmed that the IP reaction rates were effectively suppressed and that the formed polyamide thickness was reduced from 138 ± 24 nm to 46 ± 2 nm according to TEM observation. Furthermore, an optimized NF membrane with excellent performance was consequently obtained, which included boosted water permeation of about 141–238 (L/m2·h·MPa) and superior salt rejection of Na2SO4 > 98.4%. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Gas Permeation Property of Silicon Carbide Membranes Synthesized by Counter-Diffusion Chemical Vapor Deposition
Membranes 2020, 10(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10010011 - 06 Jan 2020
Abstract
An amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) membrane was synthesized by counter-diffusion chemical vapor deposition (CDCVD) using silacyclobutane (SCB) at 788 K. The SiC membrane on a Ni-γ-alumina (Al2O3) α-coated Al2O3 porous support possessed a H2 permeance [...] Read more.
An amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) membrane was synthesized by counter-diffusion chemical vapor deposition (CDCVD) using silacyclobutane (SCB) at 788 K. The SiC membrane on a Ni-γ-alumina (Al2O3) α-coated Al2O3 porous support possessed a H2 permeance of 1.2 × 10−7 mol·m−2·s−1·Pa−1 and an excellent H2/CO2 selectivity of 2600 at 673 K. The intermittent action of H2 reaction gas supply and vacuum inside porous support was very effective to supply source gas inside mesoporous intermediate layer. A SiC active layer was formed inside the Ni-γ-Al2O3 intermediate layer. The thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the SiC active layer and Ni-γ-Al2O3-coated α-Al2O3 porous support was eased by the low decomposition temperature of the SiC source and the membrane structure. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Role of Humic Acid, PP Beads, and pH with Water Backwashing in a Hybrid Water Treatment of Multichannel Alumina Microfiltration and PP Beads
Membranes 2020, 10(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10010003 - 25 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Photooxidation oxidizes most organic compounds by mineralizing them to small inorganic molecules. In this study, the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM), pH, and polypropylene (PP) beads concentration on membrane fouling were investigated in a hybrid water treatment process consisting of seven-channel alumina [...] Read more.
Photooxidation oxidizes most organic compounds by mineralizing them to small inorganic molecules. In this study, the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM), pH, and polypropylene (PP) beads concentration on membrane fouling were investigated in a hybrid water treatment process consisting of seven-channel alumina microfiltration (pore size 1.0 μm) and pure PP beads water backwashing with UV irradiation for photooxidation. The synthetic feed was prepared with humic acid and kaolin and flowed inside the microfiltration (MF) membrane. The permeate contacted the PP beads fluidized in the gap of the membrane and module with outside UV irradiation. Membrane fouling resistance (Rf) increased dramatically with an increase in the concentration of humic acid (HA) from 6 mg/L to 8 mg/L. The treatment efficiency of DOM increased dramatically, from 14.3% to 49.7%, with an increase in the concentration of HA. The Rf decreased with an increase of PP beads concentration. However, maximum permeate volume (VT) was acquired at 5 g/L of PP beads. The maximal treatment efficiency of DOM was 51.3% at 40 g/L of PP beads. The Rf increased with an increase in the pH of feed, and the maximum VT was acquired at a pH of 5. The maximal treatment efficiency of DOM was 52.5% at pH 9. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Oil Deposition on Polymer Brush-Coated NF Membranes
Membranes 2019, 9(12), 168; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes9120168 - 06 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Membrane-based processes are attractive for treating oily wastewaters. However, membrane fouling due to the deposition of oil droplets on the membrane surface compromises performance. Here, real-time observation of the deposition of oil droplets by direct confocal microscopy was conducted. Experiments were conducted in [...] Read more.
Membrane-based processes are attractive for treating oily wastewaters. However, membrane fouling due to the deposition of oil droplets on the membrane surface compromises performance. Here, real-time observation of the deposition of oil droplets by direct confocal microscopy was conducted. Experiments were conducted in dead-end and crossflow modes. Base NF 270 nanofiltration membranes as well as membranes modified by grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) chains from the membrane surface using atom transfer radical polymerization were investigated. By using feed streams containing low and high NaCl concentrations, the grafted polymer chains could be induced to switch conformation from a hydrated to a dehydrated state, as the lower critical solution temperature for the grafted polymer chains moved above and below the room temperature, respectively. For the modified membrane, it was shown that switching conformation of the grafted polymer chains led to the partial release of adsorbed oil. The results also indicate that, unlike particles such as polystyrene beads, adsorption of oil droplets can lead to coalescence of the adsorbed oil droplets on the membrane surface. The results provide further evidence of the importance of membrane properties, feed solution characteristics, and operating mode and conditions on membrane fouling. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Carbonic Anhydrase on CO2 Separation Performance of Thin Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimer/Poly(ethylene glycol) Hybrid Membranes
Membranes 2019, 9(12), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes9120167 - 05 Dec 2019
Abstract
The effect of carbonic anhydrase (CA) on the separation performance of thin poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hybrid membranes was investigated. CA, a type of enzyme, was used to promote CO2 hydration and dehydration reactions and to assess whether these reactions were [...] Read more.
The effect of carbonic anhydrase (CA) on the separation performance of thin poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hybrid membranes was investigated. CA, a type of enzyme, was used to promote CO2 hydration and dehydration reactions and to assess whether these reactions were the rate-limiting step in CO2 permeation through the membrane. The relationship between the membrane thickness and the CO2 permeance was evaluated in CO2/H2 or CO2/He separation using PAMAM/PEG hybrid membranes (thickness: 10–100 μm) with and without CA. Without CA, the CO2 permeance of PAMAM/PEG hybrid membranes was not inversely proportional to the membrane thickness. On the other hand, with CA, the CO2 permeance was inversely proportional to the membrane thickness. It was implied that, without CA, the rate-limiting step of CO2 transport was either the CO2 hydration reaction at the feed side or the CO2 dehydration reaction at the permeate side. On the other hand, with CA addition, the rate-limiting step of CO2 transport was diffusion, and CO2 permeance could be increased without sacrificing the selectivity by reducing membrane thickness. The effect of the position of CA (i.e., on the surface and/or reverse surface) on CO2 separation performance was investigated to evaluate which reaction was the rate-limiting step of CO2 permeation through the membrane. It was suggested that the rate-limiting step of CO2 permeation was CO2 dehydration reaction at the permeate side. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Preliminary Study of Emulsion Liquid Membrane Formulation on Acetaminophen Removal from the Aqueous Phase
Membranes 2019, 9(10), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes9100133 - 16 Oct 2019
Abstract
The aim of this study is to develop an Emulsion Liquid Membrane (ELM) system for the extraction of acetaminophen (ACTP). Firstly, ELM was formulated by the screening of liquid membrane components where the compatibility of diluent with other membrane phase components was investigated. [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to develop an Emulsion Liquid Membrane (ELM) system for the extraction of acetaminophen (ACTP). Firstly, ELM was formulated by the screening of liquid membrane components where the compatibility of diluent with other membrane phase components was investigated. The chosen carrier, diluent and stripping solution must comply with the reaction at the interface of the membrane to support the simultaneous processes of extraction and stripping. Therefore, parameters such as stripping agent concentration, volume ratio, initial concentration of feed phase and HCl concentration were investigated. A stable emulsion and maximum acetaminophen removal efficiency of 85% was achieved. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Fabrication and Characterization of Modified Graphene Oxide/PAN Hybrid Nanofiber Membrane
Membranes 2019, 9(9), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes9090122 - 19 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this study, a series of novel modified graphene oxide (MGO)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hybrid nanofiber membranes were fabricated by electrospinning a PAN solution containing up to 1.0 wt.% MGO. The GO was initially prepared by a time-saving improved Hummer’s method. Subsequently, the formation of [...] Read more.
In this study, a series of novel modified graphene oxide (MGO)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hybrid nanofiber membranes were fabricated by electrospinning a PAN solution containing up to 1.0 wt.% MGO. The GO was initially prepared by a time-saving improved Hummer’s method. Subsequently, the formation of GO was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), AFM, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR), and Raman spectroscopy. This study also prepared the modified GO with polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (GP) by using a simple surface post-treatment method to improve its dispersion. Varying amounts of GP were incorporated into PAN nanofibers for the better properties of GP/PAN nanofibers, such as hydrophilicity, mechanical properties, and so on. The resulting GP/PAN hybrid nanofiber membranes were characterized by SEM, FTIR, contact angle, and thermal and mechanical properties. These results showed that the hydrophilic and mechanical properties of GP/PAN hybrid nanofiber membranes were dramatically improved, i.e., 50% improvement for hydrophilicity and 3–4 times higher strength for mechanical property, which indicated the possibility for water treatment application. In addition, the notably improved thermal stability results showed that the hybrid nanofiber membranes could also be a potential candidate for the secondary battery separator. Full article
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