Special Issue "Mathematical Modeling and Simulation in Science and Engineering Education II"

A special issue of Mathematics (ISSN 2227-7390). This special issue belongs to the section "Engineering Mathematics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. J. Alberto Conejero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Pure and Applied Mathematics (IUMPA-UPV), Polytechnic University of Valencia, E-46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: applied mathematics; graph theory; data science; interdisciplinary applications of mathematics to computer science, engineering and biology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a longstanding quest to make scientific and engineering studies more attractive to potential students at all levels in order to increase the number of students choosing them as vocations. It seems that the labor opportunities that they offer in our present technological society are not sufficient for increasing the engagement of young people in science and engineering. Therefore, all efforts carried out in making the learning content more interesting are welcome. Nowadays, students can have access to a huge amount of computational and technological tools. However, the potential uses of these technologies depend, in great part, on their mathematical knowledge and skills. These competencies can be developed in different ways, such as the inclusion of mathematical modeling and simulation in the syllabus of educational programs.

Mathematical modeling enables us to describe the behavior of a broad range of phenomena and systems in nature and society. With simulations, they permit us to predict the evolution of those systems without actually testing them in the real world. This way is not only cheaper, safer, and faster, but also helps to develop critical and analytical thinking skills in students. After a preliminary model is generated, different scenarios can be easily considered by carrying out slight modifications to the model. In silicon experiments, students will obtain a better understanding of the real world and the consequences and implications of different decisions in the system. In this way, it also contributes to the development and use of assessment methods by students.

In this Special Issue, we want to feature several state-of-the-art examples of how mathematical modeling and simulations can be incorporated by different disciplines and how they can increase the engagement and results of students in science and engineering courses.

This issue is a continuation of the previous successful Special Issue “Mathematical Modeling and Simulation in Science and Engineering Education”.

Prof. Dr. J. Alberto Conejero
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Mathematics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Complex systems
  • Computational and numerical simulation
  • Engineering education
  • Engineering and environmental processes
  • Mathematical education
  • Mathematical modelling
  • Multiphysics processes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Shuffle, Cut, and Learn: Crypto Go, a Card Game for Teaching Cryptography
Mathematics 2020, 8(11), 1993; https://doi.org/10.3390/math8111993 - 08 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 925
Abstract
Cryptography is the mathematical core of information security. It serves both as a source of hard computational problems and as precise language allowing for the formalization of sound security models. While dealing with the mathematical foundations of cybersecurity is only possible in specialized [...] Read more.
Cryptography is the mathematical core of information security. It serves both as a source of hard computational problems and as precise language allowing for the formalization of sound security models. While dealing with the mathematical foundations of cybersecurity is only possible in specialized courses (tertiary level and beyond), it is essential to promote the role of mathematics in this field at early educational stages. With this in mind, we introduce Crypto Go, a physical card game that may be used both as a dissemination and as an educational tool. The game is carefully devised in order to entertain and stimulate players, while boosting their understanding on how basic cryptographic tools work and interplay. To get a preliminary assessment of our design, we collected data from a series of test workshops, which engaged over two hundred players from different ages and educational backgrounds. This basic evaluation indeed confirms that Crypto Go significantly improves students’ motivation and has a positive impact in their perception and understanding of the field. Full article
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Article
Deficits in the Statistical and Probabilistic Literacy of Citizens: Effects in a World in Crisis
Mathematics 2020, 8(11), 1872; https://doi.org/10.3390/math8111872 - 29 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1160
Abstract
The emergency caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has revealed significant deficiencies in citizens’ statistical and probabilistic knowledge and in people’s understanding of mathematical and, particularly, stochastic models, which may lead to wrong personal or institutional choices, with critical consequences for the entire [...] Read more.
The emergency caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has revealed significant deficiencies in citizens’ statistical and probabilistic knowledge and in people’s understanding of mathematical and, particularly, stochastic models, which may lead to wrong personal or institutional choices, with critical consequences for the entire population. Mathematics teachers play an essential role in ensuring citizens’ statistical and probabilistic literacy. This study aimed at analyzing the pedagogical content knowledge that teachers utilized to teach statistics and probability through considering contextualized situations. In order to accomplish this purpose, fourteen secondary mathematics teachers participated in a formative and evaluative activity that was designed using the transformational professional competence model. During each evaluative phase, a group discussion was conducted. Participants were asked to reflect on their actions when promoting statistical and probabilistic literacy by considering a range of topics (data science, didactic resources, and methodological approaches) that were addressed during the training phase. A mixed, quantitative–qualitative methodological design was used for the data collection and analysis, which involved open-ended, multiple-choice, or scale-type questions that were moderated by the Metaplan® approach and the Mentimeter® software. The main ideas that emerged from the results indicated the need to reinforce the use of real data, technological resources to handle the visualization of information, the elaboration of different types of graphs besides the classical ones, and the formulation of hypotheses. The initial diagnosis will continue within a research and practice community made up of teachers and researchers. Therefore, a working proposal based on examples and models contextualized within the COVID-19 crisis is presented in order to enhance secondary mathematics teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge. Full article
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