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Special Issue "Smart Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Won San Choi

Hanbat National University, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Yusong, South Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanomaterials; photocatalyst; nanoporous; degradation of organic pollutants; heavy metal ions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Smart nanomaterials can be defined as nanomaterials with properties engineered to change in a controlled manner under the influence of external stimuli. Temperature, force, pH, moisture, electric fields, and magnetic fields can be included as external stimuli. Smart nanomaterials are expected to make their presence strongly felt in areas like environmental remediation, energy generation and conservation, healthcare, smart textiles, and self-healing materials. of these, considerable interest has been focused on environmental remediation using smart nanomaterials because the wastewater, oily wastewater and polluted air emitted (or produced) by industry and daily activities result in serious worldwide environmental contamination. Environmental remediation deals with the elimination of contaminants or pollution from environmental media like soil, air, groundwater, surface water, or sea water.

This Special Issue considers the recent advancements in smart nanomaterials and related nanomaterials with a special focus on applications for environmental remediation. It is our pleasure to invite you to submit original research papers and short communications within the scope of this Special Issue.

Prof. Won San Choi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adsorption
  • wastewater
  • smart nanomaterials
  • cost-effective
  • organic/inorganic pollutants
  • environmental remediation
  • ion exchange
  • health hazards
  • oil/water separation

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effect of Potassium Ions on the Formation of Mixed-Valence Manganese Oxide/Graphene Nanocomposites
Materials 2019, 12(8), 1245; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12081245
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 9 April 2019 / Accepted: 11 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
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Abstract
One-pot synthesis of mixed-valence manganese oxide (MnOx)/potassium ion-doped reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composites for efficient electrochemical supercapacitors is introduced. Using manganese nitrate and potassium permanganate as co-precursors for the MnOx and by directly annealing the rGO without tedious purification steps, [...] Read more.
One-pot synthesis of mixed-valence manganese oxide (MnOx)/potassium ion-doped reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composites for efficient electrochemical supercapacitors is introduced. Using manganese nitrate and potassium permanganate as co-precursors for the MnOx and by directly annealing the rGO without tedious purification steps, as described herein, MnOx/rGO composites with a high specific capacitance of 1955.6 F g−1 at a current density of 1 A g−1 are achieved. It is found that the presence of potassium ions helps in the development of mixed-valence MnOx on the surface of the rGO. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation)
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Open AccessArticle One-Step Synthesis of Environmentally Friendly Superhydrophilic and Superhydrophobic Sponges for Oil/Water Separation
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1182; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071182
Received: 15 March 2019 / Revised: 28 March 2019 / Accepted: 5 April 2019 / Published: 11 April 2019
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Abstract
Environmentally friendly superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic sponges were synthesized using a one-step approach for oil/water separation. A superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic sponge (MFS/CC-DKGM or MFS/CC-PDMS) was synthesized by one-step coating of melamine formaldehyde sponge (MFS) with a mixture of calcium carbonate (CC) rods and deacetylized [...] Read more.
Environmentally friendly superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic sponges were synthesized using a one-step approach for oil/water separation. A superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic sponge (MFS/CC-DKGM or MFS/CC-PDMS) was synthesized by one-step coating of melamine formaldehyde sponge (MFS) with a mixture of calcium carbonate (CC) rods and deacetylized Konjac glucomannan (DKGM) [or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)]. The MFS/CC-PDMS showed excellent absorption capacity, which reached 52–76 g/g following immersion into various types of oil/water mixtures. Furthermore, the MFS/CC-DKGM and MFS/CC-PDMS exhibited excellent water- and oil-flux performances, which reached 4,702 L/m2 h and 19,591 L/m2 h, respectively, when they were used as filters. The MFS/CC-DKGM and MFS/CC-PDMS maintained their wettability characteristics relatively well after the chemical, thermal, and mechanical stability tests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation)
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Open AccessArticle Ag2S Quantum Dots Based on Flower-like SnS2 as Matrix and Enhanced Photocatalytic Degradation
Materials 2019, 12(4), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12040582
Received: 10 January 2019 / Revised: 10 February 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5799 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Ag2S quantum dots were dispersed on the surface of SnS2 nanoflowers forming a heterojunction via in-situ ion exchange to improve photocatalytic degradation of RhB. All samples exhibit the hexagonal wurtzite structure. The size of Ag2[email protected]2 composites are [...] Read more.
Ag2S quantum dots were dispersed on the surface of SnS2 nanoflowers forming a heterojunction via in-situ ion exchange to improve photocatalytic degradation of RhB. All samples exhibit the hexagonal wurtzite structure. The size of Ag2[email protected]2 composites are ~ 1.5 μm flower-like with good crystallinity. Meanwhile, the Eg of 3% Ag2[email protected]2 is close to that of pure SnS2. Consequently, the 3% Ag2[email protected]2 composite displays the excellent photocatalytic performance under simulated sunlight irradiation with good cycling stability, compared to the pure SnS2 and other composites. Due to the blue and yellow luminescence quenching, the photogenerated electrons and holes is effectively separated in the 3% Ag2[email protected]2 sample. Especially, the hydroxyl radicals and photogenerated holes are main active species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Synthesis, Characterization, and Modification of Alumina Nanoparticles for Cationic Dye Removal
Materials 2019, 12(3), 450; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12030450
Received: 27 December 2018 / Revised: 27 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
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Abstract
In the present study, alumina nanoparticles (nano-alumina) which were successfully fabricated by solvothermal method, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) methods. The removal of cationic dye, Rhodamine B (RhB), through adsorption [...] Read more.
In the present study, alumina nanoparticles (nano-alumina) which were successfully fabricated by solvothermal method, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) methods. The removal of cationic dye, Rhodamine B (RhB), through adsorption method using synthesized nano-alumina with surface modification by anionic surfactant was also investigated. An anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to modify nano-alumina surface at low pH and high ionic strength increased the removal efficiency of RhB significantly. The optimum adsorption conditions of contact time, pH, and adsorbent dosage for RhB removal using SDS modified nano-alumina (SMNA) were found to be 120 min, pH 4, and 5 mg/mL respectively. The RhB removal using SMNA reached a very high removal efficiency of 100%. After four times regeneration of adsorbent, the removal efficiency of RhB using SMNA was still higher than 86%. Adsorption isotherms of RhB onto SMNA at different salt concentrations were fitted well by a two-step model. A very high adsorption capacity of RhB onto SMNA of 165 mg/g was achieved. Adsorption mechanisms of RhB onto SMNA were discussed on the basis of the changes in surface modifications, the change in surface charges and adsorption isotherms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation)
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Open AccessArticle Industrial Waste Treatment by ETS-10 Ion Exchanger Material
Materials 2018, 11(11), 2316; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11112316
Received: 7 November 2018 / Revised: 13 November 2018 / Accepted: 15 November 2018 / Published: 18 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5998 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this project was to study the treatment of industrial waste using ETS-10 zeolite. The pollutants that must be removed were metals sourced from zinc ferrite, a processing waste derived from the use of mineral-containing zinc. The first phase of the [...] Read more.
The aim of this project was to study the treatment of industrial waste using ETS-10 zeolite. The pollutants that must be removed were metals sourced from zinc ferrite, a processing waste derived from the use of mineral-containing zinc. The first phase of the work involved the characterization of the industrial waste, zinc ferrite, in order to deepen the knowledge regarding its nature and composition. The second phase involved the removal of the metals released by the zinc ferrite in aqueous systems using the ETS-10 phase as an ion exchanger. Different chemical and physical techniques were used: plasma mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, microanalysis, and thermal analyses. A comparison between ETS-10 and commercial zeolite A performance, in the same aqueous systems, was carried out. The results showed that the metal removal efficiency of ETS-10 phase is higher than that obtained by commercial zeolite A, especially towards dangerous heavy metals such as Pb, Zn and Mn. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation)
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Open AccessArticle Effective Degradation of Rh 6G Using Montmorillonite-Supported Nano Zero-Valent Iron under Microwave Treatment
Materials 2018, 11(11), 2212; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11112212
Received: 18 October 2018 / Revised: 3 November 2018 / Accepted: 5 November 2018 / Published: 7 November 2018
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Abstract
Nano zero-valent iron has drawn great attention for the degradation of organic dyes due to its high reactivity, large specific surface area, lightweight, and magnetism. However, the aggregation and passivation of iron nanoparticles may prohibit the wide use of it. A new composite [...] Read more.
Nano zero-valent iron has drawn great attention for the degradation of organic dyes due to its high reactivity, large specific surface area, lightweight, and magnetism. However, the aggregation and passivation of iron nanoparticles may prohibit the wide use of it. A new composite material was prepared by loading nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) on montmorillonite (MMT) to overcome the above shortcomings and it was further used for the removal of Rhodamine 6G (Rh 6G) under microwave treatment in the present work. The effects of various parameters, including the initial concentration of Rh 6G, microwave power, and pH value were investigated. The new composite material (nZVI/MMT) showed an excellent degradation ability for removing Rh 6G, and the removal amount reached 500 mg/g within 15 min. The degradation rate reached 0.4365 min−1, significantly higher than most previous reports using other removal methods for Rh 6G. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation)
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Graphical abstract

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