Special Issue "Tissue Engineering Scaffolds"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2010).

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The design, fabrication and characterisation of innovative scaffold systems for tissue engineering are some of the most interesting topics in the science and engineering of traditional and novel biomaterials. New material concepts and related processing technologies are being directed to the development of multifunctional scaffolds (next generation scaffolds) which can have a drug delivery or biomolecular signalling function, thus providing enhanced support to cell attachment, growth and proliferation beyond the classical function as mechanical support and temporary extracellular matrix. A wide range of polymeric, ceramic and composite matrices, usually combining natural and synthetic biomaterials and biomolecules, are being developed which exhibit not only a tailored 3D porous morphology but also controlled nanostructured surfaces. The present special issue of MATERIALS will include the most recent and relevant contributions from materials scientists, cell biologists and tissue engineers, focusing on advanced biomaterial scaffold concepts for a wide range of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches.

Prof. Dr. Aldo R. Boccaccini
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • bioactive materials
  • scaffolds
  • tissue engineering
  • biodegradable polymers
  • bioactive glasses
  • bioceramics
  • composite materials
  • porous materials
  • nanotopography

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dual-Scale Polymeric Constructs as Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering
Materials 2011, 4(3), 527-542; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma4030527 - 01 Mar 2011
Cited by 40
Abstract
This research activity was aimed at the development of dual-scale scaffolds consisting of three-dimensional constructs of aligned poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microfilaments and electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) fibers. PCL constructs composed by layers of parallel microsized filaments (0/90° lay-down pattern), with a diameter [...] Read more.
This research activity was aimed at the development of dual-scale scaffolds consisting of three-dimensional constructs of aligned poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microfilaments and electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) fibers. PCL constructs composed by layers of parallel microsized filaments (0/90° lay-down pattern), with a diameter of around 365 μm and interfilament distance of around 191 μm, were produced using a melt extrusion-based additive manufacturing technique. PLGA electrospun fibers with a diameter of around 1 μm were collected on top of the PCL constructs with different thicknesses, showing a certain degree of alignment. Cell culture experiments employing the MC3T3 murine preosteoblast cell line showed good cell viability and adhesion on the dual-scale scaffolds. In particular, the influence of electrospun fibers on cell morphology and behavior was evident, as well as in creating a structural bridging for cell colonization in the interfilament gap. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue Engineering Scaffolds)
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Open AccessArticle
A New Highly Bioactive Composite for Scaffold Applications: A Feasibility Study
Materials 2011, 4(2), 339-354; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma4020339 - 28 Jan 2011
Cited by 31
Abstract
Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been widely investigated as scaffolding material for bone tissue engineering, mainly for its excellent biocompatibility. Presently, there is an increasing interest in the composites of hydroxyapatite with bioactive glasses, with the aim to obtain systems with improved bioactivity or mechanical [...] Read more.
Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been widely investigated as scaffolding material for bone tissue engineering, mainly for its excellent biocompatibility. Presently, there is an increasing interest in the composites of hydroxyapatite with bioactive glasses, with the aim to obtain systems with improved bioactivity or mechanical properties. Moreover, modifying the ratio between bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite results in the possibility of controlling the reaction rate of the composite scaffold in the human body. However, high temperature treatments are usually required in order to sinter HA-based composites, causing the bioactive glass to crystallize into a glass-ceramic, with possible negative effects on its bioactivity. In the present research work, a glass composition belonging to the Na2O-CaO-P2O5-SiO2 system, with a reduced tendency to crystallize, is applied to realize HA-based composites. The novel samples can be sintered at a relative low temperature (750 °C) compared to the widely studied HA/45S5 Bioglass® composites. This fact greatly helps to preserve the amorphous nature of the glass, with excellent effects in terms of bioactivity, according to in vitro tests. As a first application, the obtained composites are also tested to realize highly porous scaffolds by means of the standard burning out method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue Engineering Scaffolds)
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Open AccessCommunication
Laser Fabrication of 3D Gelatin Scaffolds for the Generation of Bioartificial Tissues
Materials 2011, 4(1), 288-299; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma4010288 - 19 Jan 2011
Cited by 79
Abstract
In the present work, the two-photon polymerization (2PP) technique was applied to develop precisely defined biodegradable 3D tissue engineering scaffolds. The scaffolds were fabricated via photopolymerization of gelatin modified with methacrylamide moieties. The results indicate that the gelatin derivative (GelMod) preserves its enzymatic [...] Read more.
In the present work, the two-photon polymerization (2PP) technique was applied to develop precisely defined biodegradable 3D tissue engineering scaffolds. The scaffolds were fabricated via photopolymerization of gelatin modified with methacrylamide moieties. The results indicate that the gelatin derivative (GelMod) preserves its enzymatic degradation capability after photopolymerization. In addition, the developed scaffolds using 2PP support primary adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) adhesion, proliferation and differentiation into the anticipated lineage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue Engineering Scaffolds)
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