Special Issue "Polymeric Materials: Surfaces, Interfaces and Bioapplications II"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Marta Fernández-García
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Guest Editor
Institute of Polymer Science and Technology, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Madrid, Spain
Interests: polymer chemistry; synthesis and modification of polymers; antimicrobial polymers; active surfaces; material characterization
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Dr. Alexandra Muñoz-Bonilla
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Guest Editor
Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros (ICTP-CSIC) & Interdisciplinary Platform for Sustainable Plastics towards a Circular Economy, SusPlast-CSIC, Spain
Interests: synthesis, polymer coatings; antimicrobial coatings; biointerfaces; porous surfaces; functional surfaces; superhydrophobicity; bioapplications
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Dr. Coro Echeverría
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Guest Editor
Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros (ICTP-CSIC) & Interdisciplinary Platform for Sustainable Plastics towards a Circular Economy, SusPlast-CSIC; Spain
Interests: polymeric micro/nanogels; smart polymers; antimicrobial polymers, rheology; cellulosic liquid crystalline polymers; natural polymers, electrospinning
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Dr. Agueda Sonseca
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Guest Editor
Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros (ICTP-CSIC) & Interdisciplinary Platform for Sustainable Plastics towards a Circular Economy, SusPlast-CSIC & Instituto de Tecnología de Materiales, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia; Spain
Interests: green polymer chemistry; enzymatic catalysis; biobased polymers; shape memory polymers; (nano)composites
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Dr. Marina P. Arrieta
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Guest Editor
Organic Chemistry Department, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain
Interests: synthesis, processing and characterization of biobased and biodegradable polymers; nanoparticles obtainment from natural resources and agro-food wastes; development of bio(nano)composites; development of active and intelligent polymeric formulations for a circular economy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Further to the success of the Special Issue of Materials “Polymeric Materials: Surfaces, Interfaces and, Bioapplications”, we are delighted to reopen the Special Issue, now entitled “Polymeric Materials: Surfaces, Interfaces and, Bioapplications II”.

Polymeric materials—either synthetic or natural—play an essential role in everyday life, especially those dedicated to bioapplications, such as medical devices, implants, drug delivery systems, active food packaging, agricultural films for farming and crop protection, biosensors, or bioremediation, among others.

This Special Issue aims to cover all the aspects related to recent innovations on surfaces, interfaces, and bioapplications of polymeric materials. Special emphasis will be placed on the influence of chemical or physical surface modification on the inferred properties, such as wettability, stimuli-responsiveness, compatibility, adhesion, toxicity, etc. Besides, contributions analyzing the effect of interfaces and interphases of polymeric blends, hybrids, or (nano)composites on their physico-chemical and biological properties are also appreciated. We also intend to include functional and protective coatings as well as thin films for biological applications in this Special Issue. Finally, we would like to emphasize that this Special Issue is widely inclusive, so we expect a large number of works to fall within its scope.

Therefore, it is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Marta Fernández-García
Dr. Alexandra Muñoz-Bonilla
Dr. Coro Echeverría
Dr. Águeda Sonseca
Dr. Marina P. Arrieta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biobased polymers/biomaterials
  • Surface modification/functionalization
  • Surface segregation micro- and nanopatterned films
  • Blends, (nano)composites and hybrid polymeric materials
  • Coatings/thin films
  • Surface wettability
  • Stimuli-responsive materials/smart surfaces
  • Bioapplications

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Development of Poly(2-Methacryloyloxyethyl Phosphorylcholine)-Functionalized Hydrogels for Reducing Protein and Bacterial Adsorption
Materials 2020, 13(4), 943; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13040943 - 20 Feb 2020
Abstract
A series of hydrogels with intrinsic antifouling properties was prepared via surface-functionalization of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [p(HEMA)]-based hydrogels with the biomembrane-mimicking zwitterionic polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) [p(MPC)]. The p(MPC)-modified hydrogels have enhanced surface wettability, high water content retention (61.0%–68.3%), and good transmittance (>90%). Notably, the [...] Read more.
A series of hydrogels with intrinsic antifouling properties was prepared via surface-functionalization of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [p(HEMA)]-based hydrogels with the biomembrane-mimicking zwitterionic polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) [p(MPC)]. The p(MPC)-modified hydrogels have enhanced surface wettability, high water content retention (61.0%–68.3%), and good transmittance (>90%). Notably, the presence of zwitterionic MPC moieties at the hydrogel surfaces lowered the adsorption of proteins such as lysozyme and bovine serum albumin (BSA) by 73%–74% and 59%–66%, respectively, and reduced bacterial adsorption by approximately 10%–73% relative to the unmodified control. The anti-biofouling properties of the p(MPC)-functionalized hydrogels are largely attributed to the dense hydration layer formed at the hydrogel surfaces by the zwitterionic moieties. Overall, the results demonstrate that biocompatible and antifouling hydrogels based on p(HEMA)-p(MPC) structures have promising potential for application in biomedical materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials: Surfaces, Interfaces and Bioapplications II)
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Open AccessArticle
Environmentally Friendly Fertilizers Based on Starch Superabsorbents
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3493; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213493 - 25 Oct 2019
Abstract
Superabsorbents starches (SASs) were synthesized and characterized starting from native corn starch, bitter cassava and sweet cassava by graft copolymerization with itaconic acid. Additionally, their swelling behavior was studied both in water and in buffer solutions with different pHs and saline solutions. Their [...] Read more.
Superabsorbents starches (SASs) were synthesized and characterized starting from native corn starch, bitter cassava and sweet cassava by graft copolymerization with itaconic acid. Additionally, their swelling behavior was studied both in water and in buffer solutions with different pHs and saline solutions. Their applicability was tested as environmentally friendly fertilizers in the absorption and release of urea, potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate at different concentrations of fertilizers. The values of swelling at the equilibrium (H) in water and different media of the graft copolymers demonstrated their superabsorbent capacity, polyelectrolyte behavior, and smart response to environmental stimuli. The percentage of fertilizer absorbed and released from the SASs was a function of the initial concentration of the fertilizer in the medium. The loading and release of SASs were depended on the initial concentration of the fertilizer in the medium as well as the nature, structure, and morphology of the starch used. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials: Surfaces, Interfaces and Bioapplications II)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Biobased Materials from Microbial Biomass and Its Derivatives
Materials 2020, 13(6), 1263; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13061263 - 11 Mar 2020
Abstract
There is a strong public concern about plastic waste, which promotes the development of new biobased materials. The benefit of using microbial biomass for new developments is that it is a completely renewable source of polymers, which is not limited to climate conditions [...] Read more.
There is a strong public concern about plastic waste, which promotes the development of new biobased materials. The benefit of using microbial biomass for new developments is that it is a completely renewable source of polymers, which is not limited to climate conditions or may cause deforestation, as biopolymers come from vegetal biomass. The present review is focused on the use of microbial biomass and its derivatives as sources of biopolymers to form new materials. Yeast and fungal biomass are low-cost and abundant sources of biopolymers with high promising properties for the development of biodegradable materials, while milk and water kefir grains, composed by kefiran and dextran, respectively, produce films with very good optical and mechanical properties. The reasons for considering microbial cellulose as an attractive biobased material are the conformational structure and enhanced properties compared to plant cellulose. Kombucha tea, a probiotic fermented sparkling beverage, produces a floating membrane that has been identified as bacterial cellulose as a side stream during this fermentation. The results shown in this review demonstrated the good performance of microbial biomass to form new materials, with enhanced functional properties for different applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials: Surfaces, Interfaces and Bioapplications II)
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Open AccessReview
Novel Bioactive and Therapeutic Root Canal Sealers with Antibacterial and Remineralization Properties
Materials 2020, 13(5), 1096; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13051096 - 01 Mar 2020
Abstract
According to the American Dental Association Survey of Dental Services Rendered (published in 2007), 15 million root canal treatment procedures are performed annually. Endodontic therapy relies mainly on biomechanical preparation, chemical irrigation and intracanal medicaments which play an important role in eliminating bacteria [...] Read more.
According to the American Dental Association Survey of Dental Services Rendered (published in 2007), 15 million root canal treatment procedures are performed annually. Endodontic therapy relies mainly on biomechanical preparation, chemical irrigation and intracanal medicaments which play an important role in eliminating bacteria in the root canal. Furthermore, adequate obturation is essential to confine any residual bacteria within the root canal and deprive them of nutrients. However, numerous studies have shown that complete elimination of bacteria is not achieved due to the complex anatomy of the root canal system. There are several conventional antibiotic materials available in the market for endodontic use. However, the majority of these antibiotics and antiseptics provide short-term antibacterial effects, and they impose a risk of developing antibacterial resistance. The root canal is a dynamic environment, and antibacterial and antibiofilm materials with long-term effects and nonspecific mechanisms of action are highly desirable in such environments. In addition, the application of acidic solutions to the root canal wall can alter the dentin structure, resulting in a weaker and more brittle dentin. Root canal sealers with bioactive properties come in direct contact with the dentin wall and can play a positive role in bacterial elimination and strengthening of the root structure. The new generation of nanostructured, bioactive, antibacterial and remineralizing additives into polymeric resin-based root canal sealers are discussed in this review. The effects of these novel bioactive additives on the physical and sealing properties, as well as their biocompatibility, are all important factors that are presented in this article. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials: Surfaces, Interfaces and Bioapplications II)
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