Special Issue "Advanced Materials and Techniques in Oral Implantology"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Claudio Stacchi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, 34129 Trieste, Italy
Interests: oral implantology; maxillary sinus floor elevation; bone regeneration
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sergio Spinato
Website
Guest Editor
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
Secretary of the International Piezoelectric Surgery Academy (IPA) Via Cavallotti 134/a, 41049 Sassuolo (MO), Italy
Interests: oral implantology; maxillary sinus floor elevation; periodontal surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multidisciplinary integration is necessary to achieve effective and predictable outcomes in every field of medicine. Oral implantology, periodontology, oral surgery, prosthesis, and materials science are strongly interconnected research fields. These disciplines have significantly evolved in recent years: improvements in implant macro- and microdesign, and new bone substitute characteristics have been proposed to meet specific functional and biological requirements.

We invite authors to submit original research articles about new biomaterials and techniques applied to the interconnected fields of oral implantology, periodontology, oral surgery, prosthesis, and materials science. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are also welcome if they provide new sound scientific evidence in these fields.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • New biomaterials and/or grafting techniques for bone regeneration;
  • New biomaterials and/or techniques for peri-implant soft tissue management;
  • New dental implant macro- and microdesigns for the improvement of osseointegration;
  • New technologies to avoid implant corrosion or degradation;
  • New concepts on microbiota biofilm control around dental implants.

We hope that new ideas will promote a fast development of these exciting topics, and we invite you to submit to this Special Issue the best of your research activities.

Prof. Claudio Stacchi
Dr. Sergio Spinato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral implantology
  • bone augmentation
  • biomaterials
  • peri-implant soft tissue management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Piezoelectric Implant Site Preparation: Influence of Handpiece Movements on Temperature Elevation
Materials 2020, 13(18), 4072; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13184072 - 14 Sep 2020
Abstract
Piezoelectric devices are widely used in oral surgical procedures, including implant site preparation. However, little is known about the influence of working movement on temperature elevation in bone. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of two different working cycles [...] Read more.
Piezoelectric devices are widely used in oral surgical procedures, including implant site preparation. However, little is known about the influence of working movement on temperature elevation in bone. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of two different working cycles on temperature elevation during piezoelectric implant site preparation. Sixty osteotomies at a depth of 10 mm were performed on bone blocks of bovine ribs using a piezoelectric tip with external irrigation (IM1s, Mectron Medical Technology, Carasco, Italy). A mechanical positioning device was used to guarantee reproducible working and measuring conditions. Two different working cycles, of 4 and 6 s, respectively, were tested, including both longitudinal and rotational movements. Temperature was recorded in real time with a fiber optic thermometer and applied pressure was maintained under 150 g. For each test, the highest recorded temperature (Tmax) and the mean temperature recorded from 30 s before to 30 s after the highest recorded temperature (T±30) were extrapolated. Tests duration was also recorded. Both Tmax and T±30 were significantly higher in the ‘6 s cycles’ group than the ‘4 s cycles’ group (42.44 ± 7.3 °C vs. 37.24 ± 4.6 °C, p = 0.002; 37.24 ± 4.6 °C vs. 33.30 ± 3.3 °C, p = 0.003). Test duration was also significantly higher using 6 s cycles compared to 4 s cycles (143.17 ± 29.4 s vs. 119.80 ± 36.4 s, p = 0.002). The results of this study indicate that working cycles of 4 s effectively reduce heat generation and working time during piezoelectric implant site preparation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials and Techniques in Oral Implantology)
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Open AccessArticle
Five Degree Internal Conical Connection and Marginal Bone Stability around Subcrestal Implants: A Retrospective Analysis
Materials 2020, 13(14), 3123; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13143123 - 13 Jul 2020
Abstract
Background: There is limited information on the effect of the connection between subcrestally placed implants and abutments on marginal bone levels. The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate marginal bone levels after definitive prosthesis delivery around implants with an internal [...] Read more.
Background: There is limited information on the effect of the connection between subcrestally placed implants and abutments on marginal bone levels. The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate marginal bone levels after definitive prosthesis delivery around implants with an internal 5° conical connection placed in a subcrestal position. Materials and methods: Patients treated with fixed prostheses supported by implants placed at a subcrestal level between 2012 and 2018 were recalled for a follow-up examination. All implants had 5° internal conical connection with platform switching. Radiographic marginal bone level (MBL) was measured. MBL change between prosthetic delivery (t0) and follow-up examination (t1) was calculated. A multiple regression model was performed to identify the most significant predictors on MBL change. Results: Ninety-three patients and 410 implants, with a mean follow-up of 2.72 ± 1.31 years, were examined. Mean MBL was −1.09 ± 0.65 mm and −1.00 ± 0.37 mm at t0 and t1, respectively, with a mean bone remodeling of 0.09 ± 0.68 mm. An implant’s vertical position in relation to the bone crest, the year of follow up and the presence of type-2 controlled diabetes were demonstrated to be influencing factors for MBL modifications. Conclusions: Subcrestally placed implants with platform switching and internal conical connection maintained stable bone levels over a mean follow-up of more than 2 years. How a tight internal conical connection between abutment and implant may contribute to this clinical evidence should be more deeply investigated. MBL variations seem to be mostly influenced by an implant’s vertical position and presence of type-2 controlled diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials and Techniques in Oral Implantology)
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