Special Issue "Materials Grown by Metal-Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Xiaohong Tang
Website
Guest Editor
School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block S2, S2-B2c-87, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore
Interests: MOVPE epitaxy growths of compound semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures; optoelectronic devices; semiconductor lasers and applications
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) or metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) epitaxial growth technology was firstly reported in the scientific literature in 1968 by Manasevit. Since then, especially in the past fifteen years, we have witnessed the tremendous development in the MOCVD technique, both in its capability and applications.

As an epitaxial crystal growth technique used for growing high quality single crystalline thin films, MOCVD has advantages in epitaxy growths with high flexibility, well control and high productivity as compared with other epitaxial growth techniques. It has been used for growing wide variety of high quality III–V binary, ternary, quaternary, and pentanary semiconductor films and semiconductor heterostructure materials for optoelectronic, photovoltaic and high speed electronic applications. It has become the most widely used technology for the growth of III-V compounds in the industry today, and has become the preferred choice for the mass fabrication of a wide range of devices.

In addition, MOCVD is also widely used in scientific research in new materials and material nano-structures. Other than being used from growing the III-V and II-VI semiconductors, MOCVD has been used for the growth of oxides, superconductors, dielectrics, and even the deposition of metal films, including Cu for electrical interconnects. These materials are comprised of different quantum structures, such as quantum wells, wires and dots, all of which have been grown using the MOCVD technique.

It is certain that MOCVD will continue play a dominant role in the nano-material-based optoelectronic and electronic device applications, as well as study of fundamental quantum phenomena.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Tang Xiaohong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • MOCVD, MOVPE
  • III-V semiconductors, II-VI semiconductors
  • oxides, superconductors, dielectrics
  • optoelectronics, photovoltaic devices, high speed and high power electronic devices, spintronics.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
Enhanced Ferromagnetism in Nanoscale GaN:Mn Wires Grown on GaN Ridges
Materials 2017, 10(5), 483; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10050483 - 02 May 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
The problem of weak magnetism has hindered the application of magnetic semiconductors since their invention, and on the other hand, the magnetic mechanism of GaN-based magnetic semiconductors has been the focus of long-standing debate. In this work, nanoscale GaN:Mn wires were grown on [...] Read more.
The problem of weak magnetism has hindered the application of magnetic semiconductors since their invention, and on the other hand, the magnetic mechanism of GaN-based magnetic semiconductors has been the focus of long-standing debate. In this work, nanoscale GaN:Mn wires were grown on the top of GaN ridges by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer shows that its ferromagnetism is greatly enhanced. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) reveal an obvious increase of Mn composition in the nanowire part, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and EDS mapping results further indicate the correlation between the abundant stacking faults (SFs) and high Mn doping. When further combined with the micro-Raman results, the magnetism in GaN:Mn might be related not only to Mn concentration, but also to some kinds of built-in defects introduced together with the Mn doping or the SFs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials Grown by Metal-Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Nitrogen-Polar (000 1 ¯ ) GaN Grown on c-Plane Sapphire with a High-Temperature AlN Buffer
Materials 2017, 10(3), 252; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10030252 - 02 Mar 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
We demonstrate growing nitrogen-polar (N-polar) GaN epilayer on c-plane sapphire using a thin AlN buffer layer by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. We have studied the influence of the AlN buffer layer on the polarity, crystalline quality, and surface morphology of the GaN epilayer [...] Read more.
We demonstrate growing nitrogen-polar (N-polar) GaN epilayer on c-plane sapphire using a thin AlN buffer layer by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. We have studied the influence of the AlN buffer layer on the polarity, crystalline quality, and surface morphology of the GaN epilayer and found that the growth temperature of the AlN buffer layer played a critical role in the growth of the GaN epilayer. The low growth temperature of the AlN buffer results in gallium-polar GaN. Even a nitridation process has been conducted. High growth temperature for an AlN buffer layer is required to achieve pure N-polarity, high crystalline quality, and smooth surface morphology for a GaN epilayer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials Grown by Metal-Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Low Pressure on Surface Roughness and Morphological Defects of 4H-SiC Epitaxial Layers
Materials 2016, 9(9), 743; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma9090743 - 31 Aug 2016
Cited by 4
Abstract
In this work, 4H-SiC epilayers are performed on 4° off-axis substrates under low pressure condition by horizontal hot wall chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) with a standard chemistry of silane-propane-hydrogen, which focuses on the effects of growth pressure on morphology, basal plane dislocations (BPDs) [...] Read more.
In this work, 4H-SiC epilayers are performed on 4° off-axis substrates under low pressure condition by horizontal hot wall chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) with a standard chemistry of silane-propane-hydrogen, which focuses on the effects of growth pressure on morphology, basal plane dislocations (BPDs) and crystalline quality. It is found that morphological defects reduce with the decreasing of growth pressure, since the surface diffusion length of absorbed adatoms increases under low growth pressure, which suppresses the nucleation of adatoms on terraces and the formation of morphological defects. However, as the surface diffusion length increases under low growth pressure, the difference of growth velocity at steps is enhanced, which leads to the extension of the steps’ width and the formation of step-bunching. Besides variation of surface diffusion length, the phenomenon described above can be correlated with different dominate modes for the minimization of surface energy at varied growth pressure. Because of the contrary influence of increased C/Si ratio and enhanced step-flow growth on the propagation of BPDs, the dislocation densities of BPDs and threading edge dislocations (TEDs) in epilayers grown at varied pressures remain basically unchanged. The crystalline quality is almost independent of growth pressure based on high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials Grown by Metal-Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Effects of Nanoscale V-Shaped Pits on GaN-Based Light Emitting Diodes
Materials 2017, 10(2), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10020113 - 28 Jan 2017
Cited by 8
Abstract
This paper reviews the formation of nanoscale V-shaped pits on GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown by the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system and studies the effect of V-shaped pits on quantum efficiency. Since V-pits could provide potential barriers around threading [...] Read more.
This paper reviews the formation of nanoscale V-shaped pits on GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown by the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system and studies the effect of V-shaped pits on quantum efficiency. Since V-pits could provide potential barriers around threading dislocations to lessen non-radiative recombinations in such a high defect environment. In our study, multiple InGaN/GaN quantum well samples with different emission wavelengths of 380, 420, 460, and 500 nm were grown, each with different nanoscale V-shaped pits of three diameters for 150, 200, and 250 nm, respectively. It was found that the multiple quantum well (MQW) sample with larger V-pits had a lower pit density, but a relatively larger total V-pits defected area. The optimum diameter of V-pits showing the highest quantum efficiency from the MQW sample depended on the emission wavelength. MQW samples with wavelengths of 380 and 500 nm exhibited the best internal quantum efficiency (IQE) performance at the smallest V-pits area; however, the best performance for MQW samples with wavelength around 420 and 460 nm occurred when large V-pit areas were presented. Photoluminescence (PL) peak shifts and Raman shifts can provide a relationship between quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) and IQE, as well as a comparison between strain and IQE. The results obtained in this phenomenological study shall provide a useful guide line in making high-performance GaN-based LEDs with wide emission spectra. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials Grown by Metal-Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy)
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