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Innovative Materials and Technologies for the Characterization and Conservation of Cultural Heritage

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2023) | Viewed by 7140

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Chemical, Environmental and Materials Engineering (DICAM) – University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: calcium phosphates; hydroxyapatite; stone; mortar; masonry; consolidation; mechanical properties; durability; composite materials; hemp
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. National Institute for Research & Development in Chemistry and Petrochemistry - ICECHIM, Bucharest, Romania
2. Faculty of Horticulture, University of Agronomic Sciences and Veterinary Medicine of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: nanomaterials; nanoparticles; analytical methods; biosynthesis; cultural heritage; archaeometry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The conservation of cultural heritage artifacts represents a major responsibility for humans in general and, in particular, for researchers worldwide. Currently, climate change is accelerating many deterioration processes that affect cultural heritage, while environmental issues call for innovative green solutions. In order to develop new and efficient materials and technologies for preserving our cultural heritage, a close collaboration and exchange of ideas between specialists in different scientific areas (materials science and engineering, archaeometry, geology, conservation science, etc.) is necessary.

This Special Issue of Materials aims at providing a forum for researchers working in the area of cultural heritage conservation, covering all the aspects related materials science issues in art and archaeology. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Development of innovative materials for cultural heritage conservation;
  • Assessment of innovative technologies for materials characterization;
  • Conservation and restoration studies based on newly developed materials;
  • Case studies providing new insights on the use of established materials;
  • Archaeometry studies on cultural heritage artifacts.

Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are welcomed.

Dr. Radu Claudiu Fierascu
Dr. Enrico Sassoni
Dr. Irina Fierascu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • innovative materials
  • green materials
  • consolidants
  • protective coatings
  • archaeometry
  • deterioration
  • conservation
  • restoration
  • nanotechnology
  • characterization techniques
  • non-destructive techniques

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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21 pages, 6114 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Latest and Innovative Silica-Based Consolidants for Volcanic Stones
by Abner Colella, Ilaria Capasso and Fabio Iucolano
Materials 2021, 14(10), 2513; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14102513 - 12 May 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1779
Abstract
This research explores the new perspectives in conservation and protection of two macroporous tuff stones, widely employed in the architectural heritage of Campania region, characterized by highly heterogeneous rock fabric and texture and a variable mineralogical composition that represent crucial factors responsible for [...] Read more.
This research explores the new perspectives in conservation and protection of two macroporous tuff stones, widely employed in the architectural heritage of Campania region, characterized by highly heterogeneous rock fabric and texture and a variable mineralogical composition that represent crucial factors responsible for their weak durability. The consolidation treatments were performed with a recently and widely used suspension of nano-silica crystals in water and with a lithium silicate solution that has received up to now scarce attention as a consolidant agent. Physical investigations (open porosity, Hg porosimetry, water absorption), morphological observations (SEM analyses) and visual appearance test (colorimetric measurements), along with assessments of performance indicators such as ultrasonic pulse velocity, surface cohesion test (peeling test) and durability test (salt crystallization), were carried out to investigate the consolidation effectiveness. Overall, lithium silicate consolidant showed a better behavior in terms of superficial cohesion, a most successful strengthening action and a considerable enhancement of salt resistance. Full article
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Review

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14 pages, 1326 KiB  
Review
Polyelectrolyte Coatings—A Viable Approach for Cultural Heritage Protection
by Ioana Cătălina Gîfu, Raluca Ianchiș, Cristina Lavinia Nistor, Cristian Petcu, Irina Fierascu and Radu Claudiu Fierascu
Materials 2023, 16(7), 2873; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16072873 - 4 Apr 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1745
Abstract
The continuous degradation of cultural heritage artifacts (due to different factors, including the rising air pollution, climate change or excessive biological activity, among others) requires the continuous development of protection strategies, technologies and materials. In this regard, polyelectrolytes have offered effective ways to [...] Read more.
The continuous degradation of cultural heritage artifacts (due to different factors, including the rising air pollution, climate change or excessive biological activity, among others) requires the continuous development of protection strategies, technologies and materials. In this regard, polyelectrolytes have offered effective ways to fight against degradation but also to conserve the cultural heritage objects. In this review, we highlight the key developments in the creation and use of polyelectrolytes for the preservation, consolidation and cleaning of the cultural heritage artifacts (with particular focus on stone, metal and artifacts of organic nature, such as paper, leather, wood or textile). The state of the art in this area is presented, as well as future development perspectives. Full article
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15 pages, 1456 KiB  
Review
A Short Overview of Recent Developments in the Application of Polymeric Materials for the Conservation of Stone Cultural Heritage Elements
by Toma Fistos, Irina Fierascu, Mihaela Doni, Irina Elena Chican and Radu Claudiu Fierascu
Materials 2022, 15(18), 6294; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15186294 - 10 Sep 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2237
Abstract
Stones are ones of the most ancient natural materials exploited by humans, with different uses, from tools to buildings, that have endured over time in better conditions than other objects belonging to cultural heritage. Given the importance of those silent witnesses of our [...] Read more.
Stones are ones of the most ancient natural materials exploited by humans, with different uses, from tools to buildings, that have endured over time in better conditions than other objects belonging to cultural heritage. Given the importance of those silent witnesses of our past, as well as our duty to preserve all parts of cultural heritage for future generations, much effort was put into the development of materials for their consolidation, protection, self-cleaning, or restoration. Protection of ancient stone monuments and objects has gained the interest of researchers in the last decades in the field of conservation of cultural heritage. In this respect, the present paper aims to be a critical discussion regarding potential polymeric materials, which can be used in restorative and conservative approaches for stone materials of cultural heritage importance, against physical degradation phenomena. Recent advances in this area are presented, as well as the current bottle-necks and future development perspectives. Full article
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