Special Issue "Magnetic Nanoparticles as High-Frequency Nano-Heaters"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Patricia De la Presa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-ADIF-CSIC, Madrid, Spain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Before the end of the 20th century, the research on hyperthermia cancer treatment, by means of inductive heating of magnetic materials lasted several decades until, in 1993, the group of Jordan (A. Jordan, P. Wust, H. Fahling, W. John, A. Hinz and R. Felix, Int. J. Hyperthermia, 1993, 9, 51-68) reported on the high heating efficiency of magnetic colloids activated by an alternating magnetic field. Thereafter, investigation on magnetic nanoparticles as high-frequency nano-heaters has grown exponentially. 

This new technique quickly became multidisciplinary; it awaked the interest of physicists, chemists, biologist, engineers, doctors, etc., since its efficacy depends on synthesis of magnetic materials, functionalization, optimization of physical and chemical properties, in-vivo and in-vitro experiments, in order to elucidate its potential application as a localized treatment of cancer.

In the last few years, new applications of these high-frequency nano-heaters have been also reported in the literature; for example, in the field of catalysis, molecular imprinting, shape memory effects in thermoplastic polymers, organic synthesis, etc. This opens a new and wide range of possibilities in the area of the heating efficiency of nanoparticles. First of all, biocompatibility is no longer a requirement; thus, there are no restrictions on material types. Second, the dispersion media can be organic or inorganic; providing different magnetic properties to the nanoparticles compared to the aqueous colloids. Finally, unlike hyperthermia cancer treatments, there are no restrictions on field frequency or amplitude.

I kindly invite you to submit your last results to this Special Issue on “Magnetic Nanoparticles as High-Frequency Nano-Heaters”, covering magnetic nanoparticles and the optimization of heating efficiencies for different applications. The issue includes the design of magnetic nanoparticles, functionalization, physicochemical properties, system modelling, and their applications to biology and medicine; however, I encourage you also to submit works exploring their potential applications to other non-biological systems.

Prof. Dr. Patricia de la Presa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Magnetic Nanoparticle
  • Hyperthermia
  • High Frequency Fields
  • Heating Efficiency
  • Specific Absorption Rate
  • Specific Loss Power
  • Hysteresis Losses
  • Calorimetry

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Role of Anisotropy in Distinguishing Domination of Néel or Brownian Relaxation Contribution to Magnetic Inductive Heating: Orientations for Biomedical Applications
Materials 2021, 14(8), 1875; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14081875 - 09 Apr 2021
Viewed by 343
Abstract
Magnetic inductive heating (MIH) has been a topic of great interest because of its potential applications, especially in biomedicine. In this paper, the parameters characteristic for magnetic inductive heating power including maximum specific loss power (SLPmax), optimal nanoparticle diameter (Dc [...] Read more.
Magnetic inductive heating (MIH) has been a topic of great interest because of its potential applications, especially in biomedicine. In this paper, the parameters characteristic for magnetic inductive heating power including maximum specific loss power (SLPmax), optimal nanoparticle diameter (Dc) and its width (ΔDc) are considered as being dependent on magnetic nanoparticle anisotropy (K). The calculated results suggest 3 different Néel-domination (N), overlapped Néel/Brownian (NB), and Brownian-domination (B) regions. The transition from NB- to B-region changes abruptly around critical anisotropy Kc. For magnetic nanoparticles with low K (K < Kc), the feature of SLP peaks is determined by a high value of Dc and small ΔDc while those of the high K (K > Kc) are opposite. The decreases of the SLPmax when increasing polydispersity and viscosity are characterized by different rates of d(SLPmax)/dσ and d(SLPmax)/dη depending on each domination region. The critical anisotropy Kc varies with the frequency of an alternating magnetic field. A possibility to improve heating power via increasing anisotropy is analyzed and deduced for Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles. For MIH application, the monodispersity requirement for magnetic nanoparticles in the B-region is less stringent, while materials in the N- and/or NB-regions are much more favorable in high viscous media. Experimental results on viscosity dependence of SLP for CoFe2O4 and MnFe2O4 ferrofluids are in good agreement with the calculations. These results indicated that magnetic nanoparticles in the N- and/or NB-regions are in general better for application in elevated viscosity media. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles as High-Frequency Nano-Heaters)
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Open AccessArticle
Local Induction Heating Capabilities of Zeolites Charged with Metal and Oxide MNPs for Application in HDPE Hydrocracking: A Proof of Concept
Materials 2021, 14(4), 1029; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14041029 - 22 Feb 2021
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Abstract
Zeolites are widely used in high-temperature oil refining processes such as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), hydrocracking, and aromatization. Significant energy cost are associated with these processes due to the high temperatures required. The induction heating promoted by magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under radio frequency [...] Read more.
Zeolites are widely used in high-temperature oil refining processes such as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), hydrocracking, and aromatization. Significant energy cost are associated with these processes due to the high temperatures required. The induction heating promoted by magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under radio frequency fields could contribute to solving this problem by providing a supplementary amount of heat in a nano-localized way, just at the active centre site where the catalytic process takes place. In this study, the potential of such a complementary route to reducing energetic requirements is evaluated. The catalytic cracking reaction under a hydrogen atmosphere (hydrocracking) applied to the conversion of plastics was taken as an application example. Thus, a commercial zeolite catalyst (H-USY) was impregnated with three different magnetic nanoparticles: nickel (Ni), cobalt (Co), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), and their combinations and subjected to electromagnetic fields. Temperature increases of approximately 80 °C were measured for H-USY zeolite impregnated with γ-Fe2O3 and Ni-γ-Fe2O3 due to the heat released under the radio frequency fields. The potential of the resulting MNPs derived catalyst for HDPE (high-density polyethylene) conversion was also evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) under hydrogen atmosphere. This study is a proof of concept to show that induction heating could be used in combination with traditional resistive heating as an additional energy supplier, thereby providing an interesting alternative in line with a greener technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles as High-Frequency Nano-Heaters)
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Open AccessArticle
Induction Heating in Nanoparticle Impregnated Zeolite
Materials 2020, 13(18), 4013; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13184013 - 10 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 569
Abstract
The ultra-stable Y (H-USY) zeolite is used as catalyst for the conversion of plastic feedstocks into high added value products through catalytic cracking technologies. However, the energy requirements associated with these processes are still high. On the other hand, induction heating by magnetic [...] Read more.
The ultra-stable Y (H-USY) zeolite is used as catalyst for the conversion of plastic feedstocks into high added value products through catalytic cracking technologies. However, the energy requirements associated with these processes are still high. On the other hand, induction heating by magnetic nanoparticles has been exploited for different applications such as cancer treatment by magnetic hyperthermia, improving of water electrolysis and many other heterogeneous catalytic processes. In this work, the heating efficiency of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle impregnated zeolites is investigated in order to determine the potential application of this system in catalytic reactions promoted by acid catalyst centers under inductive heating. The γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle impregnated zeolite has been investigated by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, ammonia temperature program desorption (NH3-TPD), H2 absorption, thermogravimetry and dc and ac-magnetometry. It is observed that the diffusion of the magnetic nanoparticles in the pores of the zeolite is possible due to a combined micro and mesoporous structure and, even when fixed in a solid matrix, they are capable of releasing heat as efficiently as in a colloidal suspension. This opens up the possibility of exploring the application at higher temperatures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles as High-Frequency Nano-Heaters)
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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceOpinion
Whither Magnetic Hyperthermia? A Tentative Roadmap
Materials 2021, 14(4), 706; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14040706 - 03 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1449
Abstract
The scientific community has made great efforts in advancing magnetic hyperthermia for the last two decades after going through a sizeable research lapse from its establishment. All the progress made in various topics ranging from nanoparticle synthesis to biocompatibilization and in vivo testing [...] Read more.
The scientific community has made great efforts in advancing magnetic hyperthermia for the last two decades after going through a sizeable research lapse from its establishment. All the progress made in various topics ranging from nanoparticle synthesis to biocompatibilization and in vivo testing have been seeking to push the forefront towards some new clinical trials. As many, they did not go at the expected pace. Today, fruitful international cooperation and the wisdom gain after a careful analysis of the lessons learned from seminal clinical trials allow us to have a future with better guarantees for a more definitive takeoff of this genuine nanotherapy against cancer. Deliberately giving prominence to a number of critical aspects, this opinion review offers a blend of state-of-the-art hints and glimpses into the future of the therapy, considering the expected evolution of science and technology behind magnetic hyperthermia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles as High-Frequency Nano-Heaters)
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