Special Issue "Advances in Luminescent Engineered Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Luís Pinto Da Silva
Website
Guest Editor
Chemistry Research Unit (CIQUP), Faculty of Sciences of University of Porto (FCUP), Porto, Portugal
Interests: luminescence; engineered nanomaterials; carbon dots; chemiluminescence; bioluminescence; photodynamic therapy; sensor development; photochemistry; computational chemistry; catalysis; green chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Engineered nanomaterials are defined as purposely developed manufactured materials, which can be either organic, inorganic or organometallic in nature. Engineered nanomaterials have dimensions at the nanoscale and possess properties that are different than bulk materials with the same composition. Such nano-based materials have attracted significant attention due to their improved performance, such as emission of light via either down-conversion or up-conversion luminescent pathways, when excited by UV, visible or infrared light.

It is my pleasure to invite you all to submit research articles, review papers and short communications focused on: fabrication of and development of synthesis strategies for luminescent engineered nanomaterials; characterization of new such nano-based materials; development of new applications for the abovementioned nanomaterials, as well as optimization of existing ones. Such applications include (but are not limited to): luminescent sensing (of ions, small-molecules, biomolecules, temperature, and pH, among others), application for light-emitting devices, bioimaging, light-based therapies and theranostics, photocatalysis, and photovoltaics.

Dr. Luís Pinto Da Silva
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • engineered nanomaterials
  • luminescence
  • material chemistry
  • up-conversion
  • down-conversion
  • optical properties
  • synthesis

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Life Cycle Assessment of the Sustainability of Enhancing the Photodegradation Activity of TiO2 with Metal-Doping
Materials 2020, 13(7), 1487; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13071487 - 25 Mar 2020
Abstract
While TiO2 nanoparticles have shown potential as photocatalysts in the degradation of organic contaminants, their inability to absorb efficiently visible light has limited their industrial application. One strategy for solving this problem is monodoping TiO2 photocatalysts with transition metals, which has [...] Read more.
While TiO2 nanoparticles have shown potential as photocatalysts in the degradation of organic contaminants, their inability to absorb efficiently visible light has limited their industrial application. One strategy for solving this problem is monodoping TiO2 photocatalysts with transition metals, which has worked in the degradation of several pollutants. However, it is not clear if this improvement is enough to offset the potential environmental impacts of adding metal ions to the synthesis of TiO2. Herein, we have used Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to determine the sustainability of monodoping TiO2 with transition metals (Fe, Co, Mn and Ni, with a 1% weight ratio) to enhance the photocatalytic properties of the photocatalyst toward the degradation of Carbamazepine and Methyl Orange, under UV-A and visible light irradiation. We found that the addition of transition-metals has no significant effect on the environmental impacts associated with the synthesis of TiO2, when a weight-based functional unit was considered. However, when photocatalytic activity was considered, major differences were found. Thus, our results demonstrate that the sustainability of monodoping with different transition metals is solely determined by their ability to enhance (or not) the photocatalytic activity of TiO2. Our data also demonstrated that isopropyl alcohol constitutes a critical point in the synthesis of TiO2 photocatalysts, with ethanol being a potential substitute. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Luminescent Engineered Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of the Environmental Impact and Efficiency of N-Doping Strategies in the Synthesis of Carbon Dots
Materials 2020, 13(3), 504; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030504 - 21 Jan 2020
Abstract
The efficiency and associated environmental impacts of different N-doping strategies of carbon dots (CDs) were evaluated. More specifically, N-doped CDs were prepared from citric acid via two main synthesis routes: Microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment with addition of N-containing small organic molecules (urea and ethylenediamine [...] Read more.
The efficiency and associated environmental impacts of different N-doping strategies of carbon dots (CDs) were evaluated. More specifically, N-doped CDs were prepared from citric acid via two main synthesis routes: Microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment with addition of N-containing small organic molecules (urea and ethylenediamine (EDA)); and microwave-assisted solvothermal treatment in N-containing organic solvents (n,n-dimethylformamide (DMF), acetonitrile and pyridine). These syntheses produced CDs with similar blue emission. However, XPS analysis revealed that CDs synthesized via both hydrothermal routes presented a better N-doping efficiency (~15 at.%) than all three solvothermal-based strategies (0.6–7 at.%). However, from the former two hydrothermal strategies, only the one involving EDA as a nitrogen-source provided a non-negligible synthesis yield, which indicates that this should be the preferred strategy. This conclusion was supported by a subsequent life cycle assessment (LCA) study, which revealed that this strategy is clearly the most sustainable one from all five studied synthesis routes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Luminescent Engineered Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis of Fe- and Co-Doped TiO2 with Improved Photocatalytic Activity Under Visible Irradiation Toward Carbamazepine Degradation
Materials 2019, 12(23), 3874; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12233874 - 24 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Pure TiO2 and Fe- and Co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) as photocatalysts were synthesized using wet chemical methods (sol-gel + precipitation). Their crystalline structure and optical properties were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible light [...] Read more.
Pure TiO2 and Fe- and Co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) as photocatalysts were synthesized using wet chemical methods (sol-gel + precipitation). Their crystalline structure and optical properties were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible light (UV-Vis) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the synthesized nanoparticles was evaluated through degradation of carbamazepine (CBZ) under UV-A and visible-light irradiations. The XRD and Raman analyses revealed that all synthesized nanomaterials showed only the anatase phase. The DRS results showed that the absorption edge was blue-shifted for Fe-doped TiO2 NPs. The decrease in charge recombination was evidenced from the PL investigation for both Co-doped and Fe-doped TiO2 nanomaterials. An enhancement in photocatalytic degradation of carbamazepine in aqueous suspension under both UV-A light and visible-light irradiations was observed for Fe-doped Titania NPs by comparison with pure TiO2. These results suggest that the doping cations could suppress the electron/hole recombination. Therefore, the photocatalytic activity of TiO2-based nanomaterials was enhanced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Luminescent Engineered Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Broadening the Photoluminescence Excitation Spectral Bandwidth of YVO4:Eu3+ Nanoparticles via a Novel Core-Shell and Hybridization Approach
Materials 2019, 12(23), 3830; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12233830 - 21 Nov 2019
Abstract
For many optoelectronic applications, it is desirable for the lanthanide-doped phosphors to have broad excitation spectrum. The excitation mechanism of the lanthanide-doped YVO4, a high quantum efficient lasing material, primarily originates from the energy transfer process from the host VO4 [...] Read more.
For many optoelectronic applications, it is desirable for the lanthanide-doped phosphors to have broad excitation spectrum. The excitation mechanism of the lanthanide-doped YVO4, a high quantum efficient lasing material, primarily originates from the energy transfer process from the host VO43− complexes to the lanthanide ions, which has an excitation spectral bandwidth range of 230–330 nm. For applications in silicon solar cells, such phosphors can convert ultraviolet light to visible light for more efficient power generation, but this spectral range is still not broad enough to cover the entire ultraviolet spectrum of solar light. In this work, a novel core-shell and inorganic–organic hybridization strategy has been employed to fabricate Eu3+-doped YVO4 nanoparticles to broaden their photoluminescence excitation spectral bandwidth to the range of 230–415 nm, covering the entire ultraviolet spectrum of solar light and enabling their potential applications in silicon solar cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Luminescent Engineered Nanomaterials)
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