Special Issue "Structural, Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Low Dimensional Systems"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dante H Mosca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR, Brazil
Interests: magnetic properties; spintronics; multifunctional materials; nanostructured materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Low-dimensional material systems with at least one of their dimensions in the nanometer scale exhibit unusual fundamental physical properties that are interesting for novel designs and revolutionary (multi)functional devices. Notably, nanoscale devices are already featuring in several emerging technologies such as spintronics, nanophotonics, nanoplasmonic, magnonics, flexible and transparent electronics, quantum computing, and other advanced applications.

As a completely different approach to the top-down methods used in seminal works in manufacturing low-dimension semiconductor structures, bottom-up assembly methods of nanostructures have been applied to materials science and have been widely used in nanoscience and technology. Among low-dimensional structures, quantum dots, nanoparticles, nanowires, ultra-thin films, and hybrid nanostructures with diversified geometries appear as building blocks for novel applications with physical properties based on quantum phenomena. Control of synthesis and processing at the nanometer scale are well-established and mature today, offering many opportunities to design, build, and adapt these low-dimensional material systems, but many fundamental issues and technological barriers still need to be overcome.

This Special Issue is devoted to works on the structure, electronic and magnetic properties of low-dimensional systems including, both theoretical and experimental contributions, for fundamental and applicable advances based on knowledge of their physical properties.

Fabrication and processing methods as well as characterization and performance evaluation of low-dimensional systems are encouraged topics. Numerical and computational approaches devoted to showing new challenges and providing insight into new means of the exploitation of low-dimensional systems of interest for academia and industry are also welcome.

Topics suitable for publication in this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • spin transfer, spin–orbit interaction, and spin-related phenomena;
  • magnetization dynamics and skyrmions;
  • nano-oxides, oxide heterostructures, and multiferroics;
  • plasmonic nanoparticles and plasmonic photovoltaics;
  • two-dimensional electron gas and topological insulators;
  • optical- and phonon-related phenomena;
  • quantum dots, nanoparticles, core–shell nanoparticles, nanowires and nanorods;
  • van der Waals material systems
  • two-dimensional superconductors and polymers;
  • carbon nanostructures (graphene, carbon nanotubes, etc.);
  • two‐dimensional materials beyond graphene: silicene, germanene, stanene, etc;
  • fabrication, self-assembling, and nanolithography processing;
  • characterizations and evaluations of nanomaterials, including theoretical and numerical methods;
  • new frontiers in low-dimensional physics and other novel phenomena.

Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome in this Special Issue addressing the fundamental and applied physics of low-dimensional materials fabricated by self-assembling, self-limiting deposition techniques, lithographic and non-lithographic advanced patterns, among other techniques, including the introduction of electrically/optically/magnetically-active impurities and defects to exploit their effects on synthesis and physical properties in low-dimensional structures.


Prof. Dante H Mosca
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Low-dimensional systems
  • Nanostructured materials
  • Fabrication and processing
  • Micro- and nano-devices
  • Design and modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Magnetic Behavior in TiS3 Nanoribbon
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3501; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213501 - 25 Oct 2019
Abstract
The electronic structure, magnetic properties and strain response of N-a-TiS3 nanoribbons are investigated by first-principles calculations. We find that the magnetic ground state is strongly dependent on width of a-TiS3. When N equals an odd number the ground state [...] Read more.
The electronic structure, magnetic properties and strain response of N-a-TiS3 nanoribbons are investigated by first-principles calculations. We find that the magnetic ground state is strongly dependent on width of a-TiS3. When N equals an odd number the ground state is a ferromagnetic (FM) metal, meanwhile, when N equals an even number the ground state is an anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) metal. More interestingly, a tensile strain as large as 6% can tune the 9-a-TiS3 nanoribbon from a FM metal to a half metal. A 4% tensile strain also causes a phase transition from AFM to FM ground state for 10-a-TiS3 nanoribbon. Our findings show that N-a-TiS3 is a promising candidate for spintronic and electronic applications. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Anisotropy of Graphene Nanoflake Diamond Interface Frictional Properties
Materials 2019, 12(9), 1425; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12091425 - 01 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the frictional properties of the interface between graphene nanoflake and single crystalline diamond substrate have been investigated. The equilibrium distance between the graphene nanoflake and the diamond substrate has been evaluated at different temperatures. This study considered the [...] Read more.
Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the frictional properties of the interface between graphene nanoflake and single crystalline diamond substrate have been investigated. The equilibrium distance between the graphene nanoflake and the diamond substrate has been evaluated at different temperatures. This study considered the effects of temperature and relative sliding angle between graphene and diamond. The equilibrium distance between graphene and the diamond substrate was between 3.34 Å at 0 K and 3.42 Å at 600 K, and it was close to the interlayer distance of graphite which was 3.35 Å. The friction force between graphene nanoflakes and the diamond substrate exhibited periodic stick-slip motion which is similar to the friction force within a graphene–Au interface. The friction coefficient of the graphene–single crystalline diamond interface was between 0.0042 and 0.0244, depending on the sliding direction and the temperature. Generally, the friction coefficient was lowest when a graphene flake was sliding along its armchair direction and the highest when it was sliding along its zigzag direction. The friction coefficient increased by up to 20% when the temperature rose from 300 K to 600 K, hence a contribution from temperature cannot be neglected. The findings in this study validate the super-lubricity between graphene and diamond and will shed light on understanding the mechanical behavior of graphene nanodevices when using single crystalline diamond as the substrate. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop