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New Advances in Low-Dimensional Materials and Nanostructures

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2022) | Viewed by 10662

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Condensed Matter Physics, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 101000 Moscow, Russia
2. Research Institute for the Development of Scientific and Educational Potential of Youth, 101000 Moscow, Russia
Interests: density functional theory calculations; atomistic simulations; molecular dynamics; low-dimensional materials; nanoparticles and nanostructures; surfaces and interfaces
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Division of Nanotechnologies in Electronics, Spintronics and Photonics, Office of Academic Programs, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 115409 Moscow, Russia
Interests: density functional theory; interatomic potentials; machine learning in materials science; molecular dynamics; 2D materials; nanoparticles
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Modern high-tech production requires advanced nanomaterials and nanostructures with specified unique characteristics. The construction of next-generation technological processes is impossible without using an improved material base, so low-dimensional structures are of particular importance. The prospects for their application are very diverse. Due to their huge specific surface area, they are excellent adsorbents and catalysts, which is especially important in such areas as energy, biochemistry, and medicine. The miniaturization of electronics inevitably leads to the need to use appropriate semiconductor nanomaterials that differ from the traditional bulk ones, which will enable a significant increase in the speed of computing systems in the future. When it comes to green energy, such as hydrogen energy, it is extremely important to create functional nanomaterials that can store enough hydrogen to be used in fuel cells. In addition, the properties of low-dimensional materials can be easily modified and tuned by doping with various functional groups, which allows for obtaining the derivatives required for specific applications.

Articles on low-dimensional materials and nanostructures, including zero-dimensional, one-dimensional, and two-dimensional systems, are invited to this Special Issue. The synthesis, structure, various physicochemical characteristics, and applications of such materials are of great scientific and practical interest. Both experimental and theoretical research are encouraged.

Dr. Konstantin P. Katin
Dr. Mikhail M. Maslov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fullerenes and nanoclusters
  • nanotubes and nanowires
  • 2D materials
  • nanomaterials
  • surfaces and interfaces
  • colloids
  • nanostructures for energy applications
  • nanostructures for biological applications
  • nanostructures for catalysis
  • modeling of nanostructures

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 2260 KiB  
Article
Distribution of Iron Nanoparticles in Arrays of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition
by Alexander V. Okotrub, Dmitriy V. Gorodetskiy, Artem V. Gusel’nikov, Anastasiya M. Kondranova, Lyubov G. Bulusheva, Mariya Korabovska, Raimonds Meija and Donats Erts
Materials 2022, 15(19), 6639; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15196639 - 24 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1403
Abstract
Arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are anisotropic nanomaterials possessing a high length-to-diameter aspect ratio, channels passing through the array, and mechanical strength along with flexibility. The arrays are produced in one step using aerosol-assisted catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD), where a mixture [...] Read more.
Arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are anisotropic nanomaterials possessing a high length-to-diameter aspect ratio, channels passing through the array, and mechanical strength along with flexibility. The arrays are produced in one step using aerosol-assisted catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD), where a mixture of carbon and metal sources is fed into the hot zone of the reactor. Metal nanoparticles catalyze the growth of CNTs and, during synthesis, are partially captured into the internal cavity of CNTs. In this work, we considered various stages of multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) growth on silicon substrates from a ferrocene–toluene mixture and estimated the amount of iron in the array. The study showed that although the mixture of precursors supplies evenly to the reactor, the iron content in the upper part of the array is lower and increases toward the substrate. The size of carbon-encapsulated iron-based nanoparticles is 20–30 nm, and, according to X-ray diffraction data, most of them are iron carbide Fe3C. The reasons for the gradient distribution of iron nanoparticles in MWCNT arrays were considered, and the possibilities of controlling their distribution were evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Low-Dimensional Materials and Nanostructures)
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12 pages, 3361 KiB  
Article
Scalable MXene and PEDOT-CNT Nanocoatings for Fibre-Reinforced Composite De-Icing
by Gediminas Monastyreckis, Juan Tortosa Siles, Petr Knotek, Maria Omastova, Andrey Aniskevich and Daiva Zeleniakiene
Materials 2022, 15(10), 3535; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15103535 - 14 May 2022
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Abstract
In this study, the de-icing performance is investigated between traditional carbon fibre-based coatings and novel MXene and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (PEDOT-CNT) nanocoatings, based on simple and scalable coating application. The thickness and morphology of the coatings are investigated using atomic force microscopy [...] Read more.
In this study, the de-icing performance is investigated between traditional carbon fibre-based coatings and novel MXene and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (PEDOT-CNT) nanocoatings, based on simple and scalable coating application. The thickness and morphology of the coatings are investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Adhesion strength, as well as electrical properties, are evaluated on rough and glossy surfaces of the composite. The flexibility and electrical sensitivity of the coatings are studied under three-point bending. Additionally, the influence of ambient temperature on coating’s electrical resistance is investigated. Finally, thermal imaging and Joule heating are analysed with high-accuracy infrared cameras. Under the same power density, the increase in average temperature is 84% higher for MXenes and 117% for PEDOT-CNT, when compared with fibre-based coatings. Furthermore, both nanocoatings result in up to three times faster de-icing. These easily processable nanocoatings offer fast and efficient de-icing for large composite structures such as wind turbine blades without adding any significant weight. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Low-Dimensional Materials and Nanostructures)
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10 pages, 3074 KiB  
Article
Screen-Printed Structures from a Highly Conductive Mildly Oxidized Graphene Suspension for Flexible Electronics
by Fedora Vasileva, Vasiliy Popov, Irina Antonova and Svetlana Smagulova
Materials 2022, 15(3), 1256; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15031256 - 08 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1479
Abstract
In this study, the screen-printed flexible humidity sensor and supercapacitor structures from a suspension of mildly oxidized graphene (MOG) was obtained. MOG suspension with a low atomic oxygen content (~20%) was synthesized by electrochemical exfoliation of natural graphite in an aqueous solution of [...] Read more.
In this study, the screen-printed flexible humidity sensor and supercapacitor structures from a suspension of mildly oxidized graphene (MOG) was obtained. MOG suspension with a low atomic oxygen content (~20%) was synthesized by electrochemical exfoliation of natural graphite in an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate. MOG films (average thickness 5 μm) with a surface resistance of 102–103 kΩ/sq were obtained by screen printing on a flexible substrate. The thermal reduction of MOG films at 200 °C reduced the surface resistance to 1.5 kΩ/sq. The laser reduction with a 474 nm and 200 mW solid-state laser reduced the surface resistance to ~0.065 kΩ/sq. Various structures were screen-printed on a flexible substrate for a variety of flexible electronics applications. The structures representing a flat supercapacitor had an average specific capacitance of ~6 μF/cm2. The tensile deformations occurring during bending reduced the capacitance by 40% at a bending radius of 2 mm. Humidity sensing structures with sensitivity of 9% were obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Low-Dimensional Materials and Nanostructures)
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10 pages, 2098 KiB  
Article
On the Possible Nature of Armchair-Zigzag Structure Formation and Heat Capacity Decrease in MWCNTs
by Alexander Ponomarev, Valeriy Egorushkin, Nadezhda Bobenko, Maksym Barabashko, Anastasiya Rezvanova and Anna Belosludtseva
Materials 2022, 15(2), 518; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15020518 - 10 Jan 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1603
Abstract
Structural disorder and temperature behavior of specific heat in multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been investigated. The results of X-ray diffractometry, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images are analyzed. The thermodynamic theory of the zigzag-armchair domain structure formation during nanotube [...] Read more.
Structural disorder and temperature behavior of specific heat in multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been investigated. The results of X-ray diffractometry, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images are analyzed. The thermodynamic theory of the zigzag-armchair domain structure formation during nanotube synthesis is developed. The influence of structural disorder on the temperature behavior of specific heat is investigated. The size of domains was estimated at ~40 nm. A decrease in heat capacity is due to this size effect. The revealed dependence of the heat capacity of MWCNTs on the structural disorder allows control over thermal properties of nanotubes and can be useful for the development of thermoelectric, thermal interface materials and nanofluids based on them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Low-Dimensional Materials and Nanostructures)
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19 pages, 3402 KiB  
Perspective
LIPSS Applied to Wide Bandgap Semiconductors and Dielectrics: Assessment and Future Perspectives
by Matteo Mastellone, Maria Lucia Pace, Mariangela Curcio, Nicola Caggiano, Angela De Bonis, Roberto Teghil, Patrizia Dolce, Donato Mollica, Stefano Orlando, Antonio Santagata, Valerio Serpente, Alessandro Bellucci, Marco Girolami, Riccardo Polini and Daniele Maria Trucchi
Materials 2022, 15(4), 1378; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15041378 - 13 Feb 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3062
Abstract
With the aim of presenting the processes governing the Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS), its main theoretical models have been reported. More emphasis is given to those suitable for clarifying the experimental structures observed on the surface of wide bandgap semiconductors (WBS) and [...] Read more.
With the aim of presenting the processes governing the Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS), its main theoretical models have been reported. More emphasis is given to those suitable for clarifying the experimental structures observed on the surface of wide bandgap semiconductors (WBS) and dielectric materials. The role played by radiation surface electromagnetic waves as well as Surface Plasmon Polaritons in determining both Low and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS is briefly discussed, together with some experimental evidence. Non-conventional techniques for LIPSS formation are concisely introduced to point out the high technical possibility of enhancing the homogeneity of surface structures as well as tuning the electronic properties driven by point defects induced in WBS. Among these, double- or multiple-fs-pulse irradiations are shown to be suitable for providing further insight into the LIPSS process together with fine control on the formed surface structures. Modifications occurring by LIPSS on surfaces of WBS and dielectrics display high potentialities for their cross-cutting technological features and wide applications in which the main surface and electronic properties can be engineered. By these assessments, the employment of such nanostructured materials in innovative devices could be envisaged. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Low-Dimensional Materials and Nanostructures)
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