Special Issue "Graphene Based Hybrid Nanostructures: Synthesis and Characterization"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Zoltán Osváth
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: graphene-metal nanoparticle hybrids; scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy; two-dimensional nanostructures; interface and surface properties

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to report on recent advances in the synthesis, characterization, and possible applications of graphene-based hybrid nanostructures. Graphene has been the focus of intense research interest due to its outstanding electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Hybrid materials integrating graphene with other metallic or semiconducting nanostructures can potentially display versatile and tunable properties, as well as novel or enhanced functionalities arising from the synergy between the properties of the constituents. The possible applications of graphene-based hybrid nanostructures include optoelectronic devices, energy storage, sensors, mechanical parts, organic electronics, stretchble transparent electrodes, and biomedicine.

This Issue primarily addresses hybrid nanostructures that contain graphene, graphene oxide, metallic or semiconducting nanoparticles, core-shell structures, functionalized graphene, chemically modified graphene, 3D interconnected networks of different nano-objects, etc. Since the properties of these hybrid materials depend also on the interaction between the components, the control of the bonding, density, and distribution of the nano-objects is an important topic of interest.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. New experimental findings as well as theoretical studies are welcome.

Dr. Zoltán Osváth
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hybrid nanostructures
  • graphene
  • graphene oxide
  • functionalized graphene
  • metallic nanoparticles
  • semiconducting nanoparticles
  • nanocomposites
  • synthesis
  • characterization
  • properties
  • applications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
LIPSS Structures Induced on Graphene-Polystyrene Composite
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3460; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213460 - 23 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) on graphene doped polystyrene was prepared by the means of a krypton fluoride (KrF) laser with the wavelength of 248 nm and precisely desired physico-chemical properties were obtained for the structure. Surface morphology after laser modification [...] Read more.
A laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) on graphene doped polystyrene was prepared by the means of a krypton fluoride (KrF) laser with the wavelength of 248 nm and precisely desired physico-chemical properties were obtained for the structure. Surface morphology after laser modification of polystyrene (PS) doped with graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) was studied. Laser fluence values of modifying laser light varied between 0–40 mJ·cm−2 and were used on polymeric PS substrates doped with 10, 20, 30, and 40 wt. % of GNP. GNP were incorporated into PS substrate with the solvent casting method and further laser modification was achieved with the same amount of laser pulses of 6000. Formed nanostructures with a periodic pattern were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The morphology was also studied with scanning electron microscopy SEM. Laser irradiation resulted in changes of chemical composition on the PS surface, such as growth of oxygen concentration. This was confirmed with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene Based Hybrid Nanostructures: Synthesis and Characterization)
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Open AccessArticle
Tin-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide and NaLi0.2Ni0.25Mn0.75Oδ as Electrode Materials for Sodium-Ion Batteries
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1074; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071074 - 01 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A tin-decorated reduced graphene oxide, originally developed for lithium-ion batteries, has been investigated as an anode in sodium-ion batteries. The composite has been synthetized through microwave reduction of poly acrylic acid functionalized graphene oxide and a tin oxide organic precursor. The final product [...] Read more.
A tin-decorated reduced graphene oxide, originally developed for lithium-ion batteries, has been investigated as an anode in sodium-ion batteries. The composite has been synthetized through microwave reduction of poly acrylic acid functionalized graphene oxide and a tin oxide organic precursor. The final product morphology reveals a composite in which Sn and SnO2 nanoparticles are homogenously distributed into the reduced graphene oxide matrix. The XRD confirms the initial simultaneous presence of Sn and SnO2 particles. SnRGO electrodes, prepared using Super-P carbon as conducting additive and Pattex PL50 as aqueous binder, were investigated in a sodium metal cell. The Sn-RGO showed a high irreversible first cycle capacity: only 52% of the first cycle discharge capacity was recovered in the following charge cycle. After three cycles, a stable SEI layer was developed and the cell began to work reversibly: the practical reversible capability of the material was 170 mA·h·g−1. Subsequently, a material of formula NaLi0.2Ni0.25Mn0.75Oδ was synthesized by solid-state chemistry. It was found that the cathode showed a high degree of crystallization with hexagonal P2-structure, space group P63/mmc. The material was electrochemically characterized in sodium cell: the discharge-specific capacity increased with cycling, reaching at the end of the fifth cycle a capacity of 82 mA·h·g−1. After testing as a secondary cathode in a sodium metal cell, NaLi0.2Ni0.25Mn0.75Oδ was coupled with SnRGO anode to form a sodium-ion cell. The electrochemical characterization allowed confirmation that the battery was able to reversibly cycle sodium ions. The cell’s power response was evaluated by discharging the SIB at different rates. At the lower discharge rate, the anode capacity approached the rated value (170 mA·h·g−1). By increasing the discharge current, the capacity decreased but the decline was not so pronounced: the anode discharged about 80% of the rated capacity at 1 C rate and more than 50% at 5 C rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene Based Hybrid Nanostructures: Synthesis and Characterization)
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