Special Issue "Advanced Coatings for Corrosion Protection"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion and Materials Degradation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Wolfram Fürbeth
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DECHEMA-Forschungsinstitut, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Interests: electrolytic corrosion, protective coatings, nanotechnology, anodizing layers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Corrosion is an important issue in many industrial fields. It leads to high economic losses of 3–4% of the GDP of an industrialized country year by year. Adequate corrosion protection is therefore essential in many applications. Among others, coatings are by far the most important technology for the corrosion protection of metallic surfaces.

In recent years, the very traditional field of coatings for corrosion protection has gained a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of protective action and corrosion mechanisms of and under protective coatings. This was necessary due to emerging environmental and health issues for some well-established compounds used in former coating systems, e.g., lead or chromates, that have been banned from industrial application. This has also led to a large amount of research in the field of advanced coating systems for corrosion protection.

This situation is the case for all the different types of protective coatings that are typically used. Novel metallic coatings, e.g., novel zinc alloys, are under development as well as novel pretreatment systems or passivating chemicals that avoid the use of chromates. The rise chemical nanotechnology has fostered the development of hybrid or inorganic sol-gel coatings, as well as nanoparticles and nanocapsules to be used as fillers in coating systems. This has also led to the development of novel self-healing and smart coatings. Furthermore, today, bio-based substances are increasingly used for organic coatings. Last but not least, new anodizing processes have also been developed in the frame of increased use of light metals for lightweight construction.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript on any of these types of advanced coatings for corrosion protection for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Wolfram Fürbeth
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metallic coatings
  • anodizing layers
  • sol-gel coatings
  • pretreatments
  • organic coatings
  • self-healing coatings
  • bio-based coatings

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mechanical and Corrosion Resistance Enhancement of Closed-Cell Aluminum Foams through Nano-Electrodeposited Composite Coatings
Materials 2019, 12(19), 3197; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12193197 - 29 Sep 2019
Abstract
This work aims to improve the properties of aluminum foams including the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance by electrodepositing a SiC/TiN nanoparticles reinforced Ni–Mo coating on the substrate. The coatings were electrodeposited at different voltages, and the morphologies of the coating were detected [...] Read more.
This work aims to improve the properties of aluminum foams including the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance by electrodepositing a SiC/TiN nanoparticles reinforced Ni–Mo coating on the substrate. The coatings were electrodeposited at different voltages, and the morphologies of the coating were detected by SEM (scanning electron microscope) to determine the most suitable voltage. We used XRD (x-ray diffraction) and TEM (transmission electron microscope) to analyze the structure of the coatings. The aluminum foams and the substrates on which the coatings were electrodeposited at a voltage of 6.0 V for different electrodeposition times were compressed on an MTS (an Electro-mechanical Universal Testing Machine) to detect the mechanical properties. The corrosion resistance before and after the electrodeposition experiment was also examined. The results showed that the coating effectively improved the mechanical properties. When the electrodeposition time was changed from 10 min to 40 min, the Wv of the aluminum foams increased from 0.852 J to 2.520 J and the σs increased from 1.06 MPa to 2.99 MPa. The corrosion resistance of the aluminum foams was significantly improved after being coated with the Ni–Mo–SiC–TiN nanocomposite coating. The self-corrosion potential, pitting potential, and potential for primary passivation were positively shifted by 294 mV, 99 mV, and 301 mV, respectively. The effect of nanoparticles on the corrosion resistance of the coatings is significant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Corrosion Protection)
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Open AccessArticle
Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Zn-Al Diffusion Layer on 45 Steel Aided by Mechanical Energy
Materials 2019, 12(18), 3032; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12183032 - 18 Sep 2019
Abstract
In harsh environments, the corrosion damage of steel structures and equipment is a serious threat to the operational safety of service. In this paper, a Zn-Al diffusion layer was fabricated on 45 steel by the Mechanical Energy Aided Diffusion Method (MEADM) at 450 [...] Read more.
In harsh environments, the corrosion damage of steel structures and equipment is a serious threat to the operational safety of service. In this paper, a Zn-Al diffusion layer was fabricated on 45 steel by the Mechanical Energy Aided Diffusion Method (MEADM) at 450 °C. The microstructure and composition, the surface topography, and the electrochemical performance of the Zn-Al diffusion layer were analyzed before and after corrosion. The results show that the Zn-Al diffusion layer are composed of Al2O3 and Γ1 phase (Fe11Zn40) and δ1 phase (FeZn6.67, FeZn8.87, and FeZn10.98) Zn-Fe alloy. There is a transition zone with the thickness of about 5 μm at the interface between the Zn-Al diffusion layer and the substrate, and a carbon-rich layer exists in this zone. The full immersion test and electrochemical test show that the compact corrosion products produced by the initial corrosion of the Zn-Al diffusion layer will firmly bond to the Zn-Al diffusion layer surface and fill the crack, which plays a role in preventing corrosion of the corrosive medium and reducing the corrosion rate of the Zn-Al diffusion layer. The salt spray test reveals that the initial corrosion products of the Zn-Al diffusion layer are mainly ZnO and Zn5(OH)8Cl2H2O. New corrosion products such as ZnAl2O4, FeOCl appear at the middle corrosion stage. The corrosion product ZnAl2O4 disappears, and the corrosion products Zn(OH)2 and Al(OH)3 appear at the later corrosion stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Corrosion Protection)
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Open AccessArticle
Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Ni-Fe-Co-P Alloy Coating Containing Nano-CeO2 Particles in NaCl Solution
Materials 2019, 12(16), 2614; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12162614 - 16 Aug 2019
Abstract
In order to study the effect of nano-CeO2 particles doping on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of pure Ni-Fe-Co-P alloy coating, Ni-Fe-Co-P-CeO2 composite coating is prepared on the surface of 45 steel by scanning electrodeposition. The morphology, composition, and phase structure of [...] Read more.
In order to study the effect of nano-CeO2 particles doping on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of pure Ni-Fe-Co-P alloy coating, Ni-Fe-Co-P-CeO2 composite coating is prepared on the surface of 45 steel by scanning electrodeposition. The morphology, composition, and phase structure of the composite coating are analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion behavior of the coatings with different concentrations of nano-CeO2 particles in 50 g/L NaCl solution is studied by Tafel polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The corrosion mechanism is discussed. The experimental results show that the obtained Ni-Fe-Co-P-CeO2 composite coating is amorphous, and the addition of nano-CeO2 particles increases the mass fraction of P. With the increase of the concentration of nano-CeO2 particles in the plating solution, the surface flatness of the coating increases. The surface of Ni-Fe-Co-P-1 g/L CeO2 composite coating is uniform and dense, and its self-corrosion potential is the most positive; the corrosion current and corrosion rate are the smallest, and the charge transfer resistance is the largest, showing the best corrosion resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Corrosion Protection)
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Open AccessArticle
Corrosion Resistance and Apatite-Forming Ability of Composite Coatings formed on Mg–Al–Zn–Ca Alloys
Materials 2019, 12(14), 2262; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12142262 - 14 Jul 2019
Abstract
The properties of composite coatings formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) were affected by the alloy composition. The corrosion resistance and apatite-forming ability of PEO coatings formed on Mg–6Al–1Zn–xCa alloys with a variation of Ca content were investigated. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance [...] Read more.
The properties of composite coatings formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) were affected by the alloy composition. The corrosion resistance and apatite-forming ability of PEO coatings formed on Mg–6Al–1Zn–xCa alloys with a variation of Ca content were investigated. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed an order magnitude improvement of corrosion resistance in the AZ61 alloy as a result of the coating. A higher enhancement in polarization resistance was obtained in the Mg–6Al–1Zn–1Ca and Mg–6Al–1Zn–2Ca alloys due to thicker coatings were formed as a result of the incorporation of calcium oxide/hydroxide. However, the underlying substrates were more prone to localized corrosion with increasing Ca content. The microstructure investigation revealed an enlargement in precipitates (Al2Ca, Mg2Ca) sizes with increasing Ca content in the alloys. The growth of larger size precipitates increased the danger to micro galvanic corrosion. Apatite layers were formed on all of the coatings indicating high apatite-forming ability, but the layers formed on the Mg–6Al–1Zn–1Ca and Mg–6Al–1Zn–2Ca alloys contained higher Mg, possibly due to the accumulation of corrosion product, than that on the Mg–6Al–1Zn alloy. The alloying element Ca should be limited to 1 wt.% as the excess tended to degrade the corrosion resistance and apatite-forming ability of the PEO coating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Corrosion Protection)
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Open AccessArticle
Mechanically Robust and Repairable Superhydrophobic Zinc Coating via a Fast and Facile Method for Corrosion Resisting
Materials 2019, 12(11), 1779; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12111779 - 31 May 2019
Abstract
Zinc coatings and superhydrophobic surfaces have their own characteristics in terms of metal corrosion resistance. Herein, we have prepared a robust and repairable superhydrophobic zinc coating (SZC) based on a widely commercially available cold galvanized paint via a fast (within 10 min) and [...] Read more.
Zinc coatings and superhydrophobic surfaces have their own characteristics in terms of metal corrosion resistance. Herein, we have prepared a robust and repairable superhydrophobic zinc coating (SZC) based on a widely commercially available cold galvanized paint via a fast (within 10 min) and facile process for corrosion resistance. Specifically, the cold galvanized paint was sprayed onto the iron substrate, followed by acetic acid (HAc) etching and stearic acid (STA) hydrophobizing. The as-obtained sample was coded as Fe-Zn-HAc-STA and possessed an apparent contact angle of 168.4 ± 1.5° as well as a sliding angle of 3.5 ± 1.2°. The Fe-Zn-HAc-STA sample was mechanically durable and easily repairable. After being ultrasonicated in ethanol for 100 min, the superhydrophobicity was still retained. The Fe-Zn-HAc-STA sample lost its superhydrophobicity after being abraded against sandpaper with a load of 100 g and regained its superhydrophobicity after HAc etching and subsequent STA hydrophobizing. The corrosion resistance of the SZC was investigated by immersing the Fe-Zn-HAc-STA sample into the static or dynamic aqueous solution of NaCl (3.5 wt.%) and the lasting life of the entrapped underwater air layer (EUAL) was roughly determined by the turning point at the variation curve of surface wettability against immersion time. The lasting life of the EUAL iwas 8 to 10 days for the SZC in the static NaCl solution and it decreased sharply to 12 h in a dynamic one with the flow rate of 2 and 4 m/s. This suggests that the superhydrophobic surface provided extra corrosion protection of 8 to 10 days or 12 h to the zinc coating. We hope that the SZC may find its practical application due to the facile and fast fabrication procedure, the good mechanical durability, the easy repairability, and the good corrosion protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Corrosion Protection)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimization of Cathodic Protection Design for Pre-Insulated Pipeline in District Heating System Using Computational Simulation
Materials 2019, 12(11), 1761; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12111761 - 30 May 2019
Abstract
Cathodic protection (CP) has been used as a primary method in the control of corrosion, therefore it is regarded as the most effective way for protecting buried pipelines. However, it is difficult to apply CP to a pipeline for district heating distribution systems, [...] Read more.
Cathodic protection (CP) has been used as a primary method in the control of corrosion, therefore it is regarded as the most effective way for protecting buried pipelines. However, it is difficult to apply CP to a pipeline for district heating distribution systems, because the pipeline has thermally insulated coatings which could disturb the CP. Theoretical calculation and field tests alone are not enough for a reliable CP design, and therefore additional CP design methods such as computational analysis should be used. In this study, the CP design for pre-insulated pipelines is tested considering several environmental factors, such as temperature and coating defect ratio. Additionally, computational analysis is performed to verify and optimize the CP design. The simulation results based on theoretical methods alone failed to satisfy the CP criteria. Then, a re-design is conducted considering the IR drop. Consequently, all of the simulation results of defective pipelines satisfied the CP criteria after adding the proper CP current. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Corrosion Protection)
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Open AccessArticle
Lotus-Inspired Multiscale Superhydrophobic AA5083 Resisting Surface Contamination and Marine Corrosion Attack
Materials 2019, 12(10), 1592; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12101592 - 15 May 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The massive and long-term service of 5083 aluminum alloy (AA5083) is restricted by several shortcomings in marine and industrial environments, such as proneness to localized corrosion attack, surface contamination, etc. Herein, we report a facile and cost-effective strategy to transform intrinsic hydrophilicity into [...] Read more.
The massive and long-term service of 5083 aluminum alloy (AA5083) is restricted by several shortcomings in marine and industrial environments, such as proneness to localized corrosion attack, surface contamination, etc. Herein, we report a facile and cost-effective strategy to transform intrinsic hydrophilicity into water-repellent superhydrophobicity, combining fluorine-free chemisorption of a hydrophobic agent with etching texture. Dual-scale hierarchical structure, surface height relief and surface chemical elements were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), successively. Detailed investigations of the wetting property, self-cleaning effect, NaCl-particle self-propelling, corrosion and long-term behavior of the consequent superhydrophobic AA5083 surface were carried out, demonstrating extremely low adhesivity and outstanding water-repellent, self-cleaning and corrosion-resisting performance with long-term stability. We believe that the low cost, scalable and fluorine-free transforming of metallic surface wettability into waterproof superhydrophobicity is a possible strategy towards anti-contamination and marine anti-corrosion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Corrosion Protection)
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