Special Issue "In Situ TEM and AFM for Investigation of Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Structure Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Luciano Lamberti
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Guest Editor
Politecnico di Bari, Italy—Dipartimento Meccanica, Matematica e Management
Interests: optical methods; experimental mechanics; materials design and characterization; nanosciences and nanotechnology; structural optimization; computational mechanics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my great pleasure to announce the Special Issue “In Situ TEM and AFM for Investigation of Materials”, which will appear in the Materials journal next year.

The investigation of materials is a very hot topic attracting great interest from the scientific community. The development of new materials and the use of “traditional” materials in more demanding applications must be supported by efficient investigation techniques. The main concern is to increase the measurement resolution getting down to a nanometer or sub-nanometer scale. Electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy are two well established techniques for the nanoscale investigation of materials.

This Special Issue will focus on the advances in the in situ investigations of materials with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The aim is to provide a forum on the state-of-the-art and frontier applications of AFM and TEM (including the development of new experimental setups) to material characterization and analysis for static and dynamic conditions. The submissions should be in the form of original research articles or authoritative review papers on the following topics (yet not limited to):

  • Atomic force microscopy and atomic force spectroscopy;
  • Transmission electron microscopy;
  • Novel AFM/AFS/TEM setups;
  • Hybrid methods and inverse methods;
  • Material characterization/analysis for static and dynamic conditions (including viscous response and plasticity);
  • Nanoscale measurements and nano-metrology (including the characterization of surface properties);
  • In situ applications for materials science;
  • In situ applications for bioengineering and biomechanics.

Prof. Luciano Lamberti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • transmission electron microscopy
  • atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy
  • nanoscience and nanotechnology
  • static and dynamic analysis and characterization of materials
  • metrology and surface characterization
  • materials science
  • aerospace engineering
  • bioengineering and biomechanics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Ion Beam Etching on the Nanoscale Damage Precursor Evolution of Fused Silica
Materials 2020, 13(6), 1294; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13061294 - 13 Mar 2020
Abstract
Nanoscale laser damage precursors generated from fabrication have emerged as a new bottleneck that limits the laser damage resistance improvement of fused silica optics. In this paper, ion beam etching (IBE) technology is performed to investigate the evolutions of some nanoscale damage precursors [...] Read more.
Nanoscale laser damage precursors generated from fabrication have emerged as a new bottleneck that limits the laser damage resistance improvement of fused silica optics. In this paper, ion beam etching (IBE) technology is performed to investigate the evolutions of some nanoscale damage precursors (such as contamination and chemical structural defects) in different ion beam etched depths. Surface material structure analyses and laser damage resistance measurements are conducted. The results reveal that IBE has an evident cleaning effect on surfaces. Impurity contamination beneath the polishing redeposition layer can be mitigated through IBE. Chemical structural defects can be significantly reduced, and surface densification is weakened after IBE without damaging the precision of the fused silica surface. The photothermal absorption on the fused silica surface can be decreased by 41.2%, and the laser-induced damage threshold can be raised by 15.2% after IBE at 250 nm. This work serves as an important reference for characterizing nanoscale damage precursors and using IBE technology to increase the laser damage resistance of fused silica optics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Situ TEM and AFM for Investigation of Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Multiscale Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Tribological Performance of GO Coating on Steel Substrates
Materials 2020, 13(1), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13010041 - 20 Dec 2019
Abstract
Herein, nano-tribological behaviour of graphene oxide (GO) coatings is evaluated by a combination of nanoscale frictional performance and adhesion, as well as macroscale numerical modelling. A suite of characterisation techniques including atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical interferometry are used to characterise the [...] Read more.
Herein, nano-tribological behaviour of graphene oxide (GO) coatings is evaluated by a combination of nanoscale frictional performance and adhesion, as well as macroscale numerical modelling. A suite of characterisation techniques including atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical interferometry are used to characterise the coatings at the asperity level. Numerical modelling is employed to consider the effectiveness of the coatings at the conjunction level. The macroscale numerical model reveals suitable deposition conditions for superior GO coatings, as confirmed by the lowest measured friction values. The proposed macroscale numerical model is developed considering both the surface shear strength of asperities of coatings obtained from AFM and the resultant morphology of the depositions obtained from surface measurements. Such a multi-scale approach, comprising numerical and experimental methods to investigate the tribological behaviour of GO tribological films has not been reported hitherto and can be applied to real-world macroscale applications such as the piston ring/cylinder liner conjunction within the modern internal combustion engine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Situ TEM and AFM for Investigation of Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Determination of Displacement Fields at the Sub-Nanometric Scale
Materials 2019, 12(11), 1804; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12111804 - 03 Jun 2019
Abstract
Macroscopic behavior of materials depends on interactions of atoms and molecules at nanometer/sub-nanometer scale. Experimental mechanics (EM) can be used for assessing relationships between the macro world and the atomic realm. Theoretical models developed at nanometric and sub-nanometric scales may be verified using [...] Read more.
Macroscopic behavior of materials depends on interactions of atoms and molecules at nanometer/sub-nanometer scale. Experimental mechanics (EM) can be used for assessing relationships between the macro world and the atomic realm. Theoretical models developed at nanometric and sub-nanometric scales may be verified using EM techniques with the final goal of deriving comprehensive but manageable models. Recently, the authors have carried out studies on EM determination of displacements and their derivatives at the macro and microscopic scales. Here, these techniques were applied to the analysis of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy patterns of a crystalline array containing dislocations. Utilizing atomic positions as carriers of information and comparing undeformed and deformed configurations of observed area, displacements and their derivatives, as well as stresses, have been obtained in the Eulerian description of deformed crystal. Two approaches are introduced. The first establishes an analogy between the basic crystalline structure and a 120° strain gage rosette. The other relies on the fact that, if displacement information along three directions is available, it is possible to reconstruct the displacement field; all necessary equations are provided in the paper. Remarkably, the validity of the Cauchy-Born conjecture is proven to be correct within the range of observed deformations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Situ TEM and AFM for Investigation of Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Reduction Temperature-Dependent Nanoscale Morphological Transformation and Electrical Conductivity of Silicate Glass Microchannel Plate
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1183; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071183 - 11 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Lead silicate glasses are fundamental materials to a microchannel plate (MCP), which is a two dimensional array of a microscopic channel charge particle multiplier. Hydrogen reduction is the core stage to determine the electrical conductivity of lead silicate glass MCP multipliers. The nanoscale [...] Read more.
Lead silicate glasses are fundamental materials to a microchannel plate (MCP), which is a two dimensional array of a microscopic channel charge particle multiplier. Hydrogen reduction is the core stage to determine the electrical conductivity of lead silicate glass MCP multipliers. The nanoscale morphologies and microscopic potential distributions of silicate glass at different reduction temperatures were investigated via atomic force microscope (AFM) and Kelvin force microscopy (KFM). We found that the bulk resistance of MCPs ballooned exponentially with the spacing of conducting islands. Moreover, bulk resistance and the spacing of conducting islands both have the BiDoseResp trend dependence on the hydrogen reduction temperature. Elements composition and valence states of lead silicate glass were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that the conducting island was an assemblage of the Pb atom originated from the reduction of Pb2+ and Pb4+. Thus, this showed the important influence of the hydrogen temperature and nanoscale morphological transformation on modulating the physical effects of MCPs, and opened up new possibilities to characterize the nanoscale electronic performance of multiphase silicate glass. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Situ TEM and AFM for Investigation of Materials)
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