Special Issue "Photocatalytic Properties and Kinetics of Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Catalytic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Diana Sannino
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo 2 132, I-84084 Fisciano, Salerno, Italy
Interests: catalysis; environmental depollution; characterization of materials; nanomaterials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Photocatalytic materials have been the subject of extensive studies in the last decade due to their unique properties such as promoted catalysis, adsorption surface, and high reactivity in mild conditions. This Special Issue is devoted to exploring and highlighting the relationships between the structure, morphological and optical properties, and the features of photocatalysts and photoactivity.

The synthetic procedures, including doping, semiconductor coupling, and surface coating, can noticeably affect the physicochemical properties of semiconductors. Innovative photocatalysts implemented as layered materials; nanostructures; size- or shape-tuned nanoparticles; micro-, meso-, and macro-structured catalysts; as well as composites with other functional materials are included. Chemical, physical, electrical, magnetic, and optical characterization will help identify correlations with the photocatalytic performance of the advanced materials.

Photocatalytic materials are able to promote photoreactions and their performance depends on the kind of molecules, level of concentration, temperature, solution pH, photocatalyst dosage, presence of other organic and inorganic compounds, and kind and intensity of light. Understanding and modeling kinetics are essential for the optimization and implementation of photocatalytic processes. Fundamental investigation on photocatalytic kinetics of semiconductors photocatalysts may validate the proposed reaction mechanism and can offer a mathematical law as function of operative parameters.

In this Special Issue, frontier researchers and colleagues are invited to present original papers and review articles involving (without being limited to) the topics listed below:

  • materials for photocatalytic water and wastewater treatment
  • materials for sustainable photocatalytic synthesis
  • materials for photocatalysis under visible light
  • materials for CO2 photoreduction
  • materials for air purification
  • materials for bacterial photoinactivation
Prof. Diana Sannino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Photocatalysis
  • Innovative semiconducting materials
  • Environmental photocatalysis
  • Photocatalytic syntheses
  • Kinetics evaluation
  • Advanced photocatalytic materials
  • Structured materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Graphitic Carbon Nitride for Photocatalytic Air Treatment
Materials 2020, 13(13), 3038; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13133038 - 07 Jul 2020
Abstract
Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is a conjugated polymer, which recently drew a lot of attention as a metal-free and UV and visible light responsive photocatalyst in the field of solar energy conversion and environmental remediation. This is due to [...] Read more.
Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is a conjugated polymer, which recently drew a lot of attention as a metal-free and UV and visible light responsive photocatalyst in the field of solar energy conversion and environmental remediation. This is due to its appealing electronic band structure, high physicochemical stability and earth-abundant nature. In the present work, bulk g-C3N4 was synthesized by thermal decomposition of melamine. This material was further exfoliated by thermal treatment. S-doped samples were prepared from thiourea or further treatment of exfoliated g-C3N4 by mesylchloride. Synthesized materials were applied for photocatalytic removal of air pollutants (acetaldehyde and NOx) according to the ISO 22197 and ISO 22197-1 methodology. The efficiency of acetaldehyde removal under UV irradiation was negligible for all g-C3N4 samples. This can be explained by the fact that g-C3N4 under irradiation does not directly form hydroxyl radicals, which are the primary oxidation species in acetaldehyde oxidation. It was proved by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy that the dominant species formed on the irradiated surface of g-C3N4 was the superoxide radical. Its production was responsible for a very high NOx removal efficiency not only under UV irradiation (which was comparable with that of TiO2), but also under visible irradiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photocatalytic Properties and Kinetics of Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation and Characterization of Defective TiO2. The Effect of the Reaction Environment on Titanium Vacancies Formation
Materials 2020, 13(12), 2763; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13122763 - 18 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Among various methods of improving visible light activity of titanium(IV) oxide, the formation of defects and vacancies (both oxygen and titanium) in the crystal structure of TiO2 is an easy and relatively cheap alternative to improve the photocatalytic activity. In the presented [...] Read more.
Among various methods of improving visible light activity of titanium(IV) oxide, the formation of defects and vacancies (both oxygen and titanium) in the crystal structure of TiO2 is an easy and relatively cheap alternative to improve the photocatalytic activity. In the presented work, visible light active defective TiO2 was obtained by the hydrothermal reaction in the presence of three different oxidizing agents: HIO3, H2O2, and HNO3. Further study on the effect of used oxidant and calcination temperature on the physicochemical and photocatalytic properties of defective TiO2 was performed. Obtained nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), specific surface area (BET) measurements, UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DR-UV/Vis), photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Degradation of phenol as a model pollutant was measured in the range of UV-Vis and Vis irradiation, demonstrating a significant increase of photocatalytic activity of defective TiO2 samples above 420 nm, comparing to non-defected TiO2. Correlation of EPR, UV-Vis, PL, and photodegradation results revealed that the optimum concentration of HIO3 to achieve high photocatalytic activity was in the range of 20–50 mol%. Above that dosage, titanium vacancies amount is too high, and the obtained materials’ photoactivity was significantly decreased. Studies on the photocatalytic mechanism using defective TiO2 have also shown that O2 radical is mainly responsible for pollutant degradation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photocatalytic Properties and Kinetics of Materials)
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