Special Issue "Recent Advances in Metal Additive Manufacturing"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Manufacturing Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Elena Bassoli
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
Interests: additive manufacturing, powder bed fusion, fatigue, electro-chemical machining

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, laser-based powder bed fusion (L-PBF) of metals is beyond doubt the additive manufacturing process with the strongest industrial impact. This rushed diffusion requires the joint efforts of the scientific community to understand, control, model, design and standardize materials and processes and mitigate the risks that such an industrial revolution entails. A qualitative leap is required in the understanding and control of the micro-mechanisms that often compromise the acceptability of the components or, worse, the long-term reliability of accepted ones. In order to meet automotive, aerospace and defence requirements more is needed from the research side.

High-end PBF components demand a thorough knowledge of the mechanical behaviour in terms of their static and, even more importantly, their dynamic properties. At present, one of the most critical risks to long-term reliability is certainly the almost unavoidable presence of microstructural singularities acting as stress intensifiers, mainly pores and local variations of composition or phase.

Concurrently, dedicated design approaches and pioneering simulation tools can support the avoidance both of build failures and of design loops due to the breakdown of the component during the validation phase, with increased confidence and repeatability, a tighter schedule and reduced costs.

This Special Issue will address the advancements in the complex set of innovations that is contributing to the complete deployment and adoption of L-PBF in the industrial sector for the production of right-first-time components.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Elena Bassoli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • powder bed fusion
  • fatigue resistance
  • design for additive manufacturing
  • process simulation
  • microstructure
  • porosity
  • powder contamination

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Optimization of the 3D Printing Parameters for Tensile Properties of Specimens Produced by Fused Filament Fabrication of 17-4PH Stainless Steel
Materials 2020, 13(3), 774; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030774 - 08 Feb 2020
Abstract
Fused filament fabrication (FFF) combined with debinding and sintering could be an economical process for three-dimensional (3D) printing of metal parts. In this paper, compounding, filament making, and FFF processing of feedstock material with 55% vol. of 17-4PH stainless steel powder in a [...] Read more.
Fused filament fabrication (FFF) combined with debinding and sintering could be an economical process for three-dimensional (3D) printing of metal parts. In this paper, compounding, filament making, and FFF processing of feedstock material with 55% vol. of 17-4PH stainless steel powder in a multicomponent binder system are presented. The experimental part of the paper encompasses central composite design for optimization of the most significant 3D printing parameters (extrusion temperature, flow rate multiplier, and layer thickness) to obtain maximum tensile strength of the 3D-printed specimens. Here, only green specimens were examined in order to be able to determine the optimal parameters for 3D printing. The results show that the factor with the biggest influence on the tensile properties was flow rate multiplier, followed by the layer thickness and finally the extrusion temperature. Maximizing all three parameters led to the highest tensile properties of the green parts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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Open AccessArticle
Aluminum Parts Fabricated by Laser-Foil-Printing Additive Manufacturing: Processing, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties
Materials 2020, 13(2), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020414 - 16 Jan 2020
Abstract
Fabrication of dense aluminum (Al-1100) parts (>99.3% of relative density) by our recently developed laser-foil-printing (LFP) additive manufacturing method was investigated as described in this paper. This was achieved by using a laser energy density of 7.0 MW/cm2 to stabilize the melt [...] Read more.
Fabrication of dense aluminum (Al-1100) parts (>99.3% of relative density) by our recently developed laser-foil-printing (LFP) additive manufacturing method was investigated as described in this paper. This was achieved by using a laser energy density of 7.0 MW/cm2 to stabilize the melt pool formation and create sufficient penetration depth with 300 μm thickness foil. The highest yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) in the LFP-fabricated samples reached 111 ± 8 MPa and 128 ± 3 MPa, respectively, along the laser scanning direction. These samples exhibited greater tensile strength but less ductility compared to annealed Al-1100 samples. Fractographic analysis showed elongated gas pores in the tensile test samples. Strong crystallographic texturing along the solidification direction and dense subgrain boundaries in the LFP-fabricated samples were observed by using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Beamless Metal Additive Manufacturing
Materials 2020, 13(4), 922; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13040922 - 19 Feb 2020
Abstract
The propensity to manufacture functional and geometrically sophisticated parts from a wide range of metals provides the metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes superior advantages over traditional methods. The field of metal AM is currently dominated by beam-based technologies such as selective laser sintering [...] Read more.
The propensity to manufacture functional and geometrically sophisticated parts from a wide range of metals provides the metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes superior advantages over traditional methods. The field of metal AM is currently dominated by beam-based technologies such as selective laser sintering (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM) which have some limitations such as high production cost, residual stress and anisotropic mechanical properties induced by melting of metal powders followed by rapid solidification. So, there exist a significant gap between industrial production requirements and the qualities offered by well-established beam-based AM technologies. Therefore, beamless metal AM techniques (known as non-beam metal AM) have gained increasing attention in recent years as they have been found to be able to fill the gap and bring new possibilities. There exist a number of beamless processes with distinctively various characteristics that are either under development or already available on the market. Since this is a very promising field and there is currently no high-quality review on this topic yet, this paper aims to review the key beamless processes and their latest developments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Optimisation of the 3D printing parameters for tensile properties of specimens produces in fused filament fabrication of 17-4PH stainless steel

Damir Godec*, Christof Lichal, Santiago Cano, Michael Kitzmantel, Clemens Holzer, Joamin Gonzalez-Gutierrez*

Fused filament fabrication (FFF) combined with debinding and sintering could be an economical process for 3D printing of metal parts. In the paper compounding, filament making and FFF processing of feedstock material 55 % vol of 17-4PH stainless steel powder in a multicomponent binder system is presented. Experimental part of the paper encompass Central Composite Design for Optimisation of the most significant 3D printing parameters (extrusion temperature, flow rate multiplier and layer thickness) due to tensile properties of the 3D printed specimens. In the research both green and sintered parts were examined in order to be able to determine the trend in tensile properties between the two stages of the process: 3D printing in the first stage, and debinding and sintering in the second stage.

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