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Topical Collection "Laser Materials Processing"

Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Frank A. Müller

Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Otto Schott Institute of Materials Research (OSIM), Colloids, Surfaces, and Interfaces (CSI), Löbdergraben 32, 07743 Jena, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bio-inspired materials; biomaterials; biomineralization; laser materials processing; additive manufacturing; surface modification; nanoparticles
Guest Editor
Dr. Stephan Gräf

Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Otto Schott Institute of Materials Research (OSIM), Colloids, Surfaces, and Interfaces (CSI), Löbdergraben 32, 07743 Jena, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bio-inspired materials; laser materials processing; functional surfaces; surface structuring; laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS)

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, industrial production processes are inconceivable without lasers. Lasers have been established in numerous areas of materials processing, like cutting, drilling and welding. A broad variety of available laser systems with different wavelengths, pulse durations, and intensities facilitate the processing of almost all types of materials, including metals, ceramics, semiconductors, polymers, and composites. The main advantages of laser-based technologies include their high flexibility and efficiency, the reproducible adjustability of processing parameters, and the excellent quality of processed products. The required amount of energy can be provided in a well-defined, locally limited volume with negligible heat transfer to surrounding components. These unique properties are continuously stimulating new applications of lasers as a tool in materials processing. Consequently, novel processing routes in surface engineering (micro- and nanostructuring; laser induced periodic surface structures), additive manufacturing (stereolithography; selective laser sintering), coating techniques (pulsed laser deposition; matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation), and nanoparticle synthesis (laser ablation; laser vaporisation) are on their way from research to industrial application.

This Special Issue covers the whole spectrum of laser materials processing, ranging from novel trends in well-established industrial processing techniques like cutting and drilling, via the synthesis of functional nanoparticles and coatings, the fabrication of sub-wavelength surface structures up to additive manufacturing techniques for the preparation of 3D scaffolds. The performance and application of laser-processed materials in the fields of biomaterials, optics, energy and environmental technologies will be discussed. In addition, fundamental research concerning the interaction between laser radiation and matter, as well as simulations and modeling of formation processes and structure–property relations will be topics of specific interest.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, short communications, as well as reviews, would be greatly appreciated.

Prof. Dr. Frank A. Müller
Dr. Stephan Gräf
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • interaction between laser radiation and matter
  • novel trends in laser materials processing
  • micro- and nanoscale structures
  • laser induced periodic surface structures
  • selective laser sintering stereolithography
  • pulsed laser deposition
  • laser-based nanoparticle synthesis
  • strategies for the fabrication of bio-inspired materials
  • application of laser processed materials
  • simulation and modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

2018

Open AccessArticle Nanosecond Laser Fabrication of Hydrophobic Stainless Steel Surfaces: The Impact on Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance
Materials 2018, 11(9), 1577; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11091577
Received: 5 August 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 1 September 2018
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Abstract
Creation of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces has attracted broad attention as a promising solution for protection of metal surfaces from corrosive environments. This work investigates the capability of nanosecond fiber laser surface texturing followed by a low energy coating in the fabrication of
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Creation of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces has attracted broad attention as a promising solution for protection of metal surfaces from corrosive environments. This work investigates the capability of nanosecond fiber laser surface texturing followed by a low energy coating in the fabrication of hydrophobic 17-4 PH stainless steel surfaces as an alternative to the ultrashort lasers previously utilized for hydrophobic surfaces production. Laser texturing of the surface followed by applying the hydrophobic coating resulted in steady-state contact angles of up to 145°, while the non-textured coated base metal exhibited the contact angle of 121°. The microstructure and compositional analysis results confirmed that the laser texturing process neither affects the microstructure of the base metal nor causes elemental loss from the melted regions during the ultrafast melting process. However, the electrochemical measurements demonstrated that the water-repelling property of the surface did not contribute to the anticorrosion capability of the substrate. The resultant higher corrosion current density, lower corrosion potential, and higher corrosion rate of the laser textured surfaces were ascribed to the size of fabricated surface micro-grooves, which cannot retain the entrapped air inside the hierarchical structure when fully immersed in a corrosive medium, thus degrading the material’s corrosion performance. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The Effect of Spot Size Combination Mode on Ablation Morphology of Aluminum Alloy by Millisecond-Nanosecond Combined-Pulse Laser
Materials 2018, 11(8), 1419; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11081419
Received: 12 July 2018 / Revised: 1 August 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 13 August 2018
PDF Full-text (5592 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Ablation morphology affects the quality of laser processing. Therefore, the control of ablation morphology is very important. The influence of spot size combination mode on the ablation morphology of aluminum alloy is studied for the first time. Experimental results show that when the
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Ablation morphology affects the quality of laser processing. Therefore, the control of ablation morphology is very important. The influence of spot size combination mode on the ablation morphology of aluminum alloy is studied for the first time. Experimental results show that when the nanosecond laser spot is larger, the ablation morphology looks like a bowl-shape, and there is little solidification near the edge. When the nanosecond laser spot is smaller, the shape of the ablation morphology is similar to a hole, and the protuberance is formed near the edge of the cavity. Through the analysis and simulation of the physical model, the physical mechanism, which describes the influence of the spot size combination mode on the molten pool, is discussed. The research results of this paper have important guiding significance for the control of laser processing effect. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

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