Special Issue "Innovative Applications of Materials to Industrial Design"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Composites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Fernando Julian
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Design, Development and Product Innovation, Dept. of Organization, Business, University of Girona, 17003 Girona, Spain
Interests: product design; innovation; green materials; composites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue aims to provide a forum for the discussion of recent advances in the use of innovative materials and the innovative use of classical materials. The focus is centered on applications to industrial design at large scales in addition to architecture and urbanism.

The scope of the Special Issue includes research on new materials with enhanced properties. This enhancement can be related to mechanical, environmental, and economic issues. Studies on the perceived quality of materials as well as new processes that render innovative materials or material properties are also of interest, as are studies which examine the lifecycle assessment or environmental impact of products.

Dr. Fernando Julian
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • innovations in materials
  • innovative applications
  • environmental impact
  • industrial design
  • perceived quality
  • design process

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Experimental Behavior of Thin-Tile Masonry under Uniaxial Compression. Multi-Leaf Case Study
Materials 2021, 14(11), 2785; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14112785 - 24 May 2021
Viewed by 353
Abstract
In this study, experimental analysis on the compressive strength of multi-leaf thin-tile masonry is presented. A compressive strength test was carried out on thin-tile, mortar and 48 specimens with two- and three-leaf thin-tile masonry. The results obtained were compared with literature on brick [...] Read more.
In this study, experimental analysis on the compressive strength of multi-leaf thin-tile masonry is presented. A compressive strength test was carried out on thin-tile, mortar and 48 specimens with two- and three-leaf thin-tile masonry. The results obtained were compared with literature on brick masonry loaded parallel to a bed joint. Based on the results of this study, the failure mode presented the first crack in the vertical interface; this crack grew until the leaf was detached. From this point until collapse, lateral buckling of the leaves was generally observed. Therefore, the detachment compressive strength value was considered relevant. Up to this point, both masonries exhibit similar stress–strain behavior. The experimental values of the detachment compressive strength were compared with the values calculated from the equation generally used in the literature to evaluate the compressive strength of brick masonry. From the results obtained, the following conclusion can be drawn: This equation is only suitable for tree-leaf thin-tile masonry but with more relevant influence on the compressive strength of the mortar. This study concluded that only three-leaf specimens behave similarly to brick masonry loaded parallel to a bed joint. Finally, whether the failure mode was due to shear or tensile stresses in the vertical thin-tile-mortar interface cannot be identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Applications of Materials to Industrial Design)
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Article
Mechanical Performance of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Exposed to Wet–Dry Cycles of Chlorides and Carbon Dioxide
Materials 2021, 14(10), 2642; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14102642 - 18 May 2021
Viewed by 327
Abstract
This paper presents an experimental study investigating the corrosion damage of carbon-steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) exposed to wet–dry cycles of chlorides and carbon dioxide for two years, and its effects on the mechanical performance of the composite over time. The results presented [...] Read more.
This paper presents an experimental study investigating the corrosion damage of carbon-steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) exposed to wet–dry cycles of chlorides and carbon dioxide for two years, and its effects on the mechanical performance of the composite over time. The results presented showed a moderate corrosion damage at fibres crossing cracks, within an approximate depth of up to 40 mm inside the crack after two-years of exposure, for the most aggressive exposure conditions investigated. Corrosion damage did not entail a significant detriment to the mechanical performance of the cracked SFRC over the time-scales investigated. Corrosion damage to steel fibres embedded in uncracked concrete was negligible, and only caused formation of rust marks at the concrete surface. Overall, the impact of fibre damage to the toughness variation of the cracked composite over the time-scale investigated was secondary compared to the toughness variation due to the fibre distribution. The impact of fibre corrosion to the performance of the cracked composite was subject to a size-effect and may only be significant for small cross-sections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Applications of Materials to Industrial Design)
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Article
Technical and Environmental Viability of a Road Bicycle Pedal Part Made of a Fully Bio-Based Composite Material
Materials 2021, 14(6), 1399; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14061399 - 13 Mar 2021
Viewed by 331
Abstract
Glass fibre is the most widely used material for reinforcing thermoplastic matrices presently and its use continues to grow. A significant disadvantage of glass fibre, however, is its impact on the environment, in particular, due to the fact that glass fibre-reinforced composite materials [...] Read more.
Glass fibre is the most widely used material for reinforcing thermoplastic matrices presently and its use continues to grow. A significant disadvantage of glass fibre, however, is its impact on the environment, in particular, due to the fact that glass fibre-reinforced composite materials are difficult to recycle. Polyamide 6 is an engineering plastic frequently used as a matrix for high-mechanical performance composites. Producing polyamide monomer requires the use of a large amount of energy and can also pose harmful environmental impacts. Consequently, glass fibre-reinforced Polyamide 6 composites cannot be considered environmentally friendly. In this work, we assessed the performance of a road cycling pedal body consisting of a composite of natural Polyamide 11 reinforced with lignocellulosic fibres from stone-ground wood, as an alternative to the conventional glass fibre-reinforced Polyamide 6 composite (the most common material used for recreational purposes). We developed a 3D model of a pedal with a geometry based on a combination of two existing commercial choices and used it to perform three finite-element tests in order to assess its strength under highly demanding static and cyclic conditions. A supplementary life cycle analysis of the pedal was also performed to determine the ecological impact. Based on the results of the simulation tests, the pedal is considered to be mechanically viable and has a significantly lower environmental impact than fully synthetic composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Applications of Materials to Industrial Design)
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Article
Vibration Serviceability of Footbridges: Classical vs. Innovative Material Solutions for Deck Slabs
Materials 2020, 13(13), 3009; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13133009 - 06 Jul 2020
Viewed by 656
Abstract
In this study, the human-induced dynamic performance of modern footbridges equipped with either classical reinforced concrete (RC) or innovative glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite deck slabs were investigated and compared. The numerical studies were carried out for two bridges: a three-span cable-stayed footbridge [...] Read more.
In this study, the human-induced dynamic performance of modern footbridges equipped with either classical reinforced concrete (RC) or innovative glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite deck slabs were investigated and compared. The numerical studies were carried out for two bridges: a three-span cable-stayed footbridge and a three-span continuous beam structure. Two variants of both bridges were taken into consideration: the footbridges equipped with traditional RC slabs and the structures benefitted with GFRP slabs. The risk of resonance as well as the vibration serviceability and the comfort criteria assessment of the footbridges with different slab materials were assessed. The investigation revealed that the footbridges, both cable-stayed and beam, benefitted with the GFRP slabs had higher fundamental frequency than those with the traditional RC slabs. The footbridges with the GFRP slabs were less exposed to the resonance risk, having fundamental frequencies above the limit of the high risk of resonance. The effect of shifting up the natural frequencies by introducing GFRP slabs was more remarkable for the lightweight beam structure than for the cable-stayed footbridge and resulted in a more significant reduction of the resonance risk. The calculated maximum human-induced accelerations of the footbridges benefitted with the GFRP slabs were meaningfully higher than those obtained for the footbridges with the RC slabs. The study proved that, with the same GFRP slab, meeting vibration serviceability and comfort criteria limits in the case of very lightweight beam structures may be more problematic than for cable-stayed footbridges with more massive structural systems. In the research, particular attention was paid to examining the impact of higher harmonics of the moving pedestrian force on the structures benefitted with the GFRP composite slabs. It occurred that in the case of footbridges, both cable-stayed and beam, equipped with the RC slabs higher harmonics of human force did not play any role in the dynamic performance of structures. However, in the case of the footbridges benefitted with the GFRP slabs, the impact of higher harmonics of the pedestrian force on the dynamic behavior of structures was clearly visible. Higher harmonics excited accelerations comparable to those executed by the first harmonic component. This conclusion is of great importance for footbridges equipped with GFRP slabs. The fundamental frequency may place a footbridge in the low or even negligible risk resonance range and the higher frequencies corresponding to vertical modes may be located above the limit of 5 Hz that ensures avoiding resonance. Nevertheless, the fact that fundamental modes are so responsive to higher harmonics significantly increases the risk of resonance. The amplification of the dynamic response may occur due to frequencies related to second or third harmonics (i.e., being half or a third of the natural frequencies). In such cases, full dynamic analysis of a footbridge at the design stage seems to be of crucial importance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Applications of Materials to Industrial Design)
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