Special Issue "Recent Progress in Graphene and 2D Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Carbon Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jae Young Choi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 2066 Seobu-ro, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 16419, Korea
Interests: graphene; 2D materials; pseudo-2D materials; chain-based 1D/2D materials; van der Walls heterostructures
Prof. Dr. Jae-Hyun Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, 2016 World Cup-ro, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 16499, Korea
Interests: graphene; 2D materials; van der Walls heterostructures; nanoelectronics; synthesis and characterization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research into the production of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials by resurfacing three-dimensional (3D) crystals, currently used in various aspects of our lives, has progressed rapidly since the discovery of simple approaches to synthesizing single-layer graphene over a decade ago. As a result, dozens of 2D layered materials that possess the characteristics of semiconductors, conductors, and insulators have been discovered. Previously, only small flakes of 2D layered materials could be synthesized, but, gradually, it has become possible to synthesize 2D layered materials with a larger area and single-crystalline structure. Very recently, the controlled stacking of 2D layered materials at the atomic level revealed new physical and chemical phenomena. Based on this fundamental research, new electronic, optical, energy, and sensor devices are being developed that can overcome the physical limitations of current mainstream technology.

This Special Issue is devoted to providing the latest cutting-edge fundamental and applied research across all aspects of graphene and 2D layered materials. Full papers, communications, and reviews on experimental and theoretical studies of 2D layered structures and materials are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Jae Young Choi
Prof. Dr. Jae-Hyun Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Graphene and graphene-derived materials
  • 2D layered materials (TMDCs, hBN, MXene, Xene, etc.)
  • Pseudo-2D materials
  • Chain-based 1D/2D materials
  • Van der Waals heterostructures
  • Applications of devices based on 2D layered materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
Pattern Pick and Place Method for Twisted Bi- and Multi-Layer Graphene
Materials 2019, 12(22), 3740; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12223740 - 13 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Twisted bi-layer graphene (tBLG) has attracted much attention because of its unique band structure and properties. The properties of tBLG vary with small differences in the interlayer twist angle, but it is difficult to accurately adjust the interlayer twist angle of tBLG with [...] Read more.
Twisted bi-layer graphene (tBLG) has attracted much attention because of its unique band structure and properties. The properties of tBLG vary with small differences in the interlayer twist angle, but it is difficult to accurately adjust the interlayer twist angle of tBLG with the conventional fabrication method. In this study, we introduce a facile tBLG fabrication method that directly picks up a single-crystalline graphene layer from a growth substrate and places it on another graphene layer with a pre-designed twist angle. Using this approach, we stacked single-crystalline graphene layers with controlled twist angles and thus fabricated tBLG and twisted multi-layer graphene (tMLG). The structural, optical and electrical properties depending on the twist angle and number of layers, were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro–Raman spectroscopy, and gate-dependent sheet resistance measurements. The obtained results show that the pick and place approach enables the direct dry transfer of the top graphene layer on the as-grown graphene to fabricate uniform tBLG and tMLG with minimal interlayer contamination and pre-defined twist angles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Graphene and 2D Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Thickness-Dependence Electrical Characterization of the One-Dimensional van der Waals TaSe3 Crystal
Materials 2019, 12(15), 2462; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12152462 - 02 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Needle-like single crystalline wires of TaSe3 were massively synthesized using the chemical vapor transport method. Since the wedged-shaped single TaSe3 molecular chains were stacked along the b-axis by weak van der Waals interactions, a few layers of TaSe3 flakes could [...] Read more.
Needle-like single crystalline wires of TaSe3 were massively synthesized using the chemical vapor transport method. Since the wedged-shaped single TaSe3 molecular chains were stacked along the b-axis by weak van der Waals interactions, a few layers of TaSe3 flakes could be easily isolated using a typical mechanical exfoliation method. The exfoliated TaSe3 flakes had an anisotropic planar structure, and the number of layers could be controlled by a repeated peeling process until a monolayer of TaSe3 nanoribbon was obtained. Through atomic force and scanning Kelvin probe microscope analyses, it was found that the variation in the work function with the thickness of the TaSe3 flakes was due to the interlayer screening effect. We believe that our results will not only help to add a novel quasi-1D block for nanoelectronics devices based on 2D van der Waals heterostructures, but also provide crucial information for designing proper contacts in device architecture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Graphene and 2D Materials)
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