Special Issue "Friction and Wear of Engineering Materials "

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Daniele Botto
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy
Interests: Contact mechanics, Tribology, Aeroengine dynamics
Dr. Mario Lavella
Website
Guest Editor
Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy
Interests: Contact mechanics, Tribology, Fatigue, Material modelling, Internal combustion engines

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Scientists have studied friction and wear from the late fifteenth century, when Leonardo da Vinci developed the first friction model. More recently, in 1966, H. Peter Jost coined the new word "Tribology" to indicate the combined effect of friction and wear that influences the strength of materials. Previous work on this topic underlined the multidisciplinary nature of friction and wear, which requires knowledge drawn from contact mechanics, materials science, chemistry and physics in general. Friction is one of the main sources of energy dissipation between the contact surfaces and the dissipation of energy is the main cause of wear.

Although the tribology in the broadest sense has studied for so long all the facets of this complex subject have not yet been thoroughly examined and research in this field is going on all over the world.

Materials is providing a Special Issue that is intended to be a means for researchers and engineers of different disciplines to publish and exchange the latest results of their research. This Special Issue will focus on progress in understanding both the fundamental and applied aspects of wear and friction of materials. With the aim of highlighting this concept, this special issue will focus on the following topics:

Wear: Theory, Modeling and Simulation.

Wear: Testing and Monitoring.

Friction and Wear under Vibratory Contact.

Engine Tribology and wear at high temperature.

Wear of Coatings.

Wear of Tools.

Tribocorrosion.

Role of Third Bodies during Wear.

Others.

We warmly invite you to submit a manuscript(s) for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Daniele Botto
Dr. Mario Lavella
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wear
  • Friction
  • Tribology
  • Fretting
  • Elevated Temperature
  • Material behavior
  • Coatings

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Tribological Properties of Si3N4-hBN Composite Ceramics Bearing on GCr15 under Seawater Lubrication
Materials 2020, 13(3), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030635 - 31 Jan 2020
Abstract
This paper concerns a comparative study on the tribological properties of Si3N4-10 vol% hBN bearing on GCr15 steel under seawater lubrication and dry friction and fresh-water lubrication by using a pin-on-disc tribometer. The results showed that the lower friction [...] Read more.
This paper concerns a comparative study on the tribological properties of Si3N4-10 vol% hBN bearing on GCr15 steel under seawater lubrication and dry friction and fresh-water lubrication by using a pin-on-disc tribometer. The results showed that the lower friction coefficient (around 0.03) and wear rate (10−6 mm/Nm) of SN10/GCr15 tribopair were obtained under seawater condition. This might be caused by the comprehensive effects of hydrodynamics and boundary lubrication of surface films formed after the tribo-chemical reaction. Despite SN10/GCr15 tribopair having 0.07 friction coefficient in the pure-water environment, the wear mechanismsits were dominated by the adhesive wear and abrasive wear under the dry friction conditions, and delamination, plowing, and plastic deformation occured on the worn surface. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that the products formed after tribo-chemaical reaction were Fe2O3, SiO2, and B2O3 and small amounts of salts from the seawater, and it was these deposits on the worn surface under seawater lubrication conditions that, served to lubricate and protect the wear surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Friction and Wear of Engineering Materials )
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Open AccessArticle
Insight into the Effect of TDMs on the Tribological Behaviors of the Ionic Liquid Composite Films
Materials 2020, 13(1), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13010191 - 02 Jan 2020
Abstract
Ionic liquid (IL) combined with 2D materials has evoked considerable attention in the field of lubrication applications because of their speical structure and outstanding lubrication properties. However, the ambiguous effect of the 2D materials on the friction and anti-wear properties of the IL [...] Read more.
Ionic liquid (IL) combined with 2D materials has evoked considerable attention in the field of lubrication applications because of their speical structure and outstanding lubrication properties. However, the ambiguous effect of the 2D materials on the friction and anti-wear properties of the IL needs futher study. Here, we have obtained two families of IL composite films with additives of MoS 2 and graphene via a combined process of spin-coated and curing, and the distinction of the effects of two additives on the tribological performance of the IL films was studied. The friction tests showed that the friction coefficient and anti-wear life of the IL films were greatly enhanced after the addition of MoS 2 or graphene, which could be attributed to the improved load-carrying capacity and the second lubrication phase. Under a low addition content, graphene had more advantages to reduce the friction of the films, and MoS 2 was more beneficial to the tribological properties with the additional content increased. The films with low friction and good anti-wear properties may be valuable for the rational design of lubrication films for the practical engineering applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Friction and Wear of Engineering Materials )
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Open AccessArticle
Wear Induced Failure of Automotive Disc Brakes—A Case Study
Materials 2019, 12(24), 4214; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12244214 - 15 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper investigated a failure in a ventilated disc brake in an automobile. The failed brake disc had been in service for approximately 10 years. The observed failure was in the form of radial cracks that appeared to have initiated at the outer [...] Read more.
This paper investigated a failure in a ventilated disc brake in an automobile. The failed brake disc had been in service for approximately 10 years. The observed failure was in the form of radial cracks that appeared to have initiated at the outer edge of the disc brake. The cracks were rather straight with no branching. Optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to study the microstructure of the failed disc. Vickers microhardness test was also used to evaluate the hardness of the samples. Results showed that the root cause of crack formation, in this case, was related to the excessive wear in the brake disc. Different wear mechanisms, namely abrasive and adhesive wear, were recognized in the failed specimen. Moreover, the worn surface in some areas was covered with fine oxide particles. These particles appeared to have a significant contribution toward abrasion. To further understand the wear mechanisms, pin-on-disc experiments were also conducted on the samples. Results of the pin-on-disc experiments were compared and correlated to the results obtained from the failed brake disc. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Friction and Wear of Engineering Materials )
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Open AccessArticle
Comparison of the Friction and Wear Characteristics between Copper and Paper Based Friction Materials
Materials 2019, 12(18), 2988; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12182988 - 15 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Copper-based friction material (CFM) and paper-based friction material (PFM) are the two most commonly used clutch friction materials. The friction and wear characteristics of these two kinds of friction materials under dry conditions were investigated by the pin-on-disc test over a broad range [...] Read more.
Copper-based friction material (CFM) and paper-based friction material (PFM) are the two most commonly used clutch friction materials. The friction and wear characteristics of these two kinds of friction materials under dry conditions were investigated by the pin-on-disc test over a broad range of applied loads, rotating speeds and ambient temperatures. Before experiments, the running-in test was conducted to stabilize the coefficient of friction (COF) and wear amount of the test samples. After experiments, the metallographic micrographs of the tested samples were presented to investigate the wear mechanisms. Experimental results showed that both the COF and wear depth of the CFM are much greater than these of PFM. The COF of CFM decreases with the increase of applied load, and changes slightly with the variation of rotating speed, whereas it increases first and then decreases with the increase of ambient temperature. However, the COF of PFM decreases dramatically with the increase of the rotating speed and ambient temperature, while it remains stable at first and then decreases slowly as the applied load increases. Additionally, under such three working conditions, the wear depth of CFM changes linearly, while the wear depth of PFM varies greatly. This study can be used as a guide for selecting friction materials for clutches with different applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Friction and Wear of Engineering Materials )
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