Special Issue "Synthesis, Sintering and Application of Ceramic Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Manufacturing Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Dariusz Kata
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ceramics and Refractories, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow 30-059, Poland
Interests: synthesis and sintering of ceramic advanced materials; examination of structure and microstructure polycrystalline ceramic composites; thermal dissociation of nitrides and carbides; measurements of structural and functional properties of advanced ceramic polycrystals; preparation and rheological study of UV-cure ceramic pastes; joining of the materials and shaping by rapid prototyping; synthesis and study of electrical characteristics of materials use for anodes in SOFCs; production of ceramic filters for purification of drinking water of bacteria and viruses
Dr. Jan Huebner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ceramics and Refractories, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow 30-059, Poland
Interests: laser additive manufacturing of advanced materials; alternative production methods of metal matrix composites; laser surface modification of alloys by deposition of gradient ceramic coatings; microstructural examination of polycrystalline ceramics and metals; thermal analysis of superalloy–carbide composites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Materials presents a collection of high-quality papers including original research designed to capture relations between the new route of synthesis, sintering, and final ceramic materials properties. It shows width and excitement in recent materials research for functional and structural applications. This includes a set of results that intersects critical areas in advanced manufacturing and chemical synthesis, with specific topics that combine scientific discovery with engineering applications. The aim of the issue lies on three fundamental features of ceramic processing and its property measurements:

  • New route of materials synthesis for achieving high-quality green powders suitable for subsequent processing. Innovative aspects of chemical and physical reactions are expected to lead to obtaining powders having a controlled phase and chemical composition. Green materials in the form of micro or nano powder may be used for sintering or other types of processing;
  • Manufacturing of dense or porous ceramic polycrystals by solid or liquid state sintering. Characterization of mass transfer by pressureless sintering, hot-pressing (HP) or spark plasma sintering (SPS). Microstructure depiction related to heat treatment and other sintering conditions. Specific behavior of ceramic powder densification;
  • Functional and structural properties of advanced ceramic for use both at room and elevated temperature to support manufacturing within sectors such as chemical, mechanical, electronical, and energy production.

The Special Issue welcomes high-quality research articles from the rapidly developing ceramic fields that lie at the borders between materials science and engineering and the fundamental physics and chemistry.

Prof. Dr. Dariusz Kata
Dr. Jan Huebner
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ceramic materials
  • Synthesis
  • Sintering
  • Functional and structural properties
  • Microstructure examination
  • Structure measurements
  • Energy sector application
  • Additive manufacturing
  • Thermal properties

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dense KNN Polycrystals Doped by Er2O3 Obtained by Hot Pressing with Hexagonal Boron Nitride Protective Layer
Materials 2020, 13(24), 5741; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13245741 - 16 Dec 2020
Viewed by 410
Abstract
Analysis of dense Potassium Sodium Niobate (KNN) ceramic obtained by hot pressing (HP) method at 1100 °C are presented in this paper. The synthesis of KNN-based piezoelectrics meets the following challenges—low density of material, uncontrolled K/Na ratio, multiphase composition and formation of different [...] Read more.
Analysis of dense Potassium Sodium Niobate (KNN) ceramic obtained by hot pressing (HP) method at 1100 °C are presented in this paper. The synthesis of KNN-based piezoelectrics meets the following challenges—low density of material, uncontrolled K/Na ratio, multiphase composition and formation of different KNN structures. The classical hot pressing approach results in contamination by carbon originating from graphite molds. The proposed hexagonal Boron Carbide (h-BN) layer between green sample and graphite mold could protect samples from carbon contamination. Additionally, the presence of h-BN may decrease the formation of oxygen vacancies, which allows us to maintain the semiconductor features of the KNN structure. Remaining issues were addressed with the addition of excess Na and Er2O3 doping. The results showed that excess Na addition allowed us to compensate evaporation of sodium during the synthesis and sintering. Er2O3 was added as sintering aid to limit abnormal grain growth caused by h–BN addition. The modification of amount of Na and Er2O3 addition resulted in high purity KNN samples with tetragonal structure and apparent density higher than 97%. Finally, piezoelectric features of prepared dense samples were measured and presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis, Sintering and Application of Ceramic Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Piezoelectric Particulate Composite for Energy Harvesting from Mechanical Vibration
Materials 2020, 13(21), 4925; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13214925 - 02 Nov 2020
Viewed by 533
Abstract
Energy harvesting from mechanical vibration of buildings is usually realized by the use of devices, in which the main element is a prismatic beam with a rectangular cross-section. The beam has been the subject of scientific research; it is usually constructed with a [...] Read more.
Energy harvesting from mechanical vibration of buildings is usually realized by the use of devices, in which the main element is a prismatic beam with a rectangular cross-section. The beam has been the subject of scientific research; it is usually constructed with a carrying substrate that does not have piezoelectric characteristics and from piezoelectric material. In contrast, this investigation sought to create a beam structure with a piezoelectric composite only. The entire beam structure was made of a prototype piezoelectric particulate composite. Based on courses of voltage obtained in laboratory experiments and known geometry of the specimens, a series of finite element method (FEM) simulations was performed, aiming to estimate the piezoelectric coefficient d31 value at which the mentioned voltage could be achieved. In each specimen, sedimentation caused the formation of two distinct layers: top and bottom. The experiments revealed that the presented prototype piezoelectric particulate composite converts mechanical stress to electric energy in bending mode, which is used in energy harvesting from mechanical vibration. It is self-supporting and thus a carrying substrate is not required in the harvester structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis, Sintering and Application of Ceramic Materials)
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