E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Advanced Cancer Nanotechnology"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Montserrat Calleja

IMN-CSIC Isaac Newton 8, PTM-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: multifunctional nanomechanical systems; coupled nanomechanical resonators; optomechanics; nanomechanical biochips; cell nanomechanics; theory and modelling
Guest Editor
Dr. Priscila Kosaka

IMM-CSIC Isaac Newton 8, PTM-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ultra high sensitivity biosensors; plasmonics; nanomechanics; cancer diagnostics; HIV diagnosis
Guest Editor
Dr. Javier Tamayo

IMM-CSIC Isaac Newton 8, PTM-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bionanomechanics; cell mechanics; nanomechanical mass spectrometry; optomechanics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer is a leading cause of death globally. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that approximately nine million people die of cancer every year. The battle against cancer gathers today researchers across diverse fields in science. Nanoscience and nanotechnology advancements can offer innovative research avenues and new tools to deepen our understanding about cancer initiation and evolution of the disease. Additionally, nanomaterials have shown great promise for the development of better cancer treatment strategies and nanosensors have the potential to provide early detection of the disease.

In this Special Issue, research in nanoscience and nanotechnology focused to answer the challenges in cancer diagnosis and treatment will be gathered to provide a wide and deep understanding of the field today.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Montserrat Calleja
Dr. Priscila Kosaka
Dr. Javier Tamayo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cancer diagnosis
  • biosensors
  • nanoparticles
  • cell mechanics
  • plasmonics
  • nanomechanics
  • bionanomechanics
  • proteomics

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Silver, Gold, and Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Alter miRNA Expression but Do Not Affect DNA Methylation in HepG2 Cells
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1038; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071038
Received: 20 February 2019 / Revised: 14 March 2019 / Accepted: 26 March 2019 / Published: 29 March 2019
PDF Full-text (1356 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The increasing use of nanoparticles (NPs) in various applications entails the need for reliable assessment of their potential toxicity for humans. Originally, studies concerning the toxicity of NPs focused on cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, but more recently, attention has been paid to epigenetic [...] Read more.
The increasing use of nanoparticles (NPs) in various applications entails the need for reliable assessment of their potential toxicity for humans. Originally, studies concerning the toxicity of NPs focused on cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, but more recently, attention has been paid to epigenetic changes induced by nanoparticles. In the present research, we analysed the DNA methylation status of genes related to inflammation and apoptosis as well as the expression of miRNAs related to these processes in response to silver (AgNPs), gold (AuNPs), and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) at low cytotoxic doses in HepG2 cells. There were no significant differences between treated and control cells in the DNA methylation status. We identified nine miRNAs, the expression of which was significantly altered by treatment with nanoparticles. The highest number of changes was induced by AgNPs (six miRNAs), followed by AuNPs (four miRNAs) and SPIONs (two miRNAs). Among others, AgNPs suppressed miR-34a expression, which is of particular interest since it may be responsible for the previously observed AgNPs-mediated HepG2 cells sensitisation to tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Most of the miRNAs affected by NP treatment in the present study have been previously shown to inhibit cell proliferation and tumourigenesis. However, based on the observed changes in miRNA expression we cannot draw definite conclusions regarding the pro- or anti-tumour nature of the NPs under study. Further research is needed to fully elucidate the relation between observed changes in miRNA expression and the effect of NPs observed at the cellular level. The results of the present study support the idea of including epigenetic testing during the toxicological assessment of the biological interaction of nanomaterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Cancer Nanotechnology)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Nanocomplexes of Graphene Oxide and Platinum Nanoparticles against Colorectal Cancer Colo205, HT-29, HTC-116, SW480, Liver Cancer HepG2, Human Breast Cancer MCF-7, and Adenocarcinoma LNCaP and Human Cervical Hela B Cell Lines
Materials 2019, 12(6), 909; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12060909
Received: 26 February 2019 / Revised: 11 March 2019 / Accepted: 15 March 2019 / Published: 19 March 2019
PDF Full-text (4797 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Inefficient drug administration into cancer cells is related to the chemoresistance of cancer cells caused by genetic mutations including genes involved in drug transport, enzyme metabolism, and/or DNA damage repair. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the properties of platinum [...] Read more.
Inefficient drug administration into cancer cells is related to the chemoresistance of cancer cells caused by genetic mutations including genes involved in drug transport, enzyme metabolism, and/or DNA damage repair. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the properties of platinum (NP-Pt), graphene oxide (GO), and the nanocomplex of GO functionalized with platinum nanoparticles (GO-NP-Pt) against several genetically, phenotypically, and metabolically different cancer cell lines: Colo205, HT-29, HTC-116, SW480, HepG2, MCF-7, LNCaP, and Hela B. The anticancer effects toward the cancer cell lines were evaluated by 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide salt (XTT) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assays and measurements of cell apoptosis and morphology deformations. The NP-Pt and GO could effectively be introduced to cancer cells, but more effective delivery was observed after GO-NP-Pt treatment. The delivery of the GO-NP-Pt nanocomplex significantly decreased the viability of Colo 205 and HepG2 cells, but did not increase the cytotoxicity of other investigated cancer cells. The nanocomplex GO-NP-Pt also significantly increased the apoptosis of Colo 205 and HepG2 cancer cells. The obtained results suggest that the nanocomplex GO-NP-Pt is a remarkable nanostructure that can improve the delivery of Pt nanoparticles into cancer cells and has potential anticancer applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Cancer Nanotechnology)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Characterization of Iron Core–Gold Shell Nanoparticles for Anti-Cancer Treatments: Chemical and Structural Transformations During Storage and Use
Materials 2018, 11(12), 2572; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11122572
Received: 16 November 2018 / Revised: 10 December 2018 / Accepted: 12 December 2018 / Published: 17 December 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3050 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Finding a cancer-selective drug that avoids damaging healthy cells and organs is a holy grail in medical research. In our previous studies, gold-coated iron ([email protected]) nanoparticles showed cancer selective anti-cancer properties in vitro and in vivo but were found to gradually lose that [...] Read more.
Finding a cancer-selective drug that avoids damaging healthy cells and organs is a holy grail in medical research. In our previous studies, gold-coated iron ([email protected]) nanoparticles showed cancer selective anti-cancer properties in vitro and in vivo but were found to gradually lose that activity with storage or “ageing”. To determine the reasons for this diminished anti-cancer activity, we examined [email protected] nanoparticles at different preparation and storage stages by means of transmission electron microscopy combined with and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, along with X-ray diffraction analysis and cell viability tests. We found that dried and reconstituted [email protected] nanoparticles, or [email protected] nanoparticles within cells, decompose into irregular fragments of γ-F2O3 and agglomerated gold clumps. These changes cause the loss of the particles’ anti-cancer effects. However, we identified that the anti-cancer properties of [email protected] nanoparticles can be well preserved under argon or, better still, liquid nitrogen storage for six months and at least one year, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Cancer Nanotechnology)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: Nanocomplexes of graphene oxide and platinum nanoparticles against colorectal cancer Colo205, HT-29, HTC-116, SW480, liver cancer HepG2, human breast cancer MCF-7 and adenocarcinoma LNCaP and human cervical Hela B cells line
Authors: Marta Kutwin1, Ewa Sawosz1, Slawomir Jaworski1, Mateusz Wierzbicki1, Barbara Strojny1, Marta Grodzik1, Malwina Ewa Sosnowska1, Maciej Trzaskowski2, André Chwalibo
Abstract: The formation of cancer cells is related to the genetic mutation, abnormalities at hormone and immune conditions, which have also an impact on the chemoresistance of cancer cells. The insufficient drug administration into cancer cells is related to cancer resistance caused by the genetic mutations including genes involved in the drug transport, metabolizing enzymes and/or DNA damage repairs.
The objective of the present study has been to evaluate properties of platinum (NP-Pt), graphene oxide (GO) and the nanocomplex of GO functionalized with platinum nanoparticles (GO-Pt) against several genetically, phenotypically and metabolically different cancer cells line: Colo205, HT-29, HTC-116, SW480, HepG2, MCF-7, LNCaP and Hela B. The anticancer effects toward cancer cell lines were evaluated by XTT and BrdU assays and measurements of cell apoptosis and morphology deformations. GO was effectively combined with NP-Pt by in situ ultrasonication, forming a nanocomplex of GO-Pt. NP-Pt and GO could be efficiently introduced to cancer cells, but more effective delivery was observed after GO-Pt treatment. The delivery of GO-Pt nanocomplex significantly decreased the viability of HepG2 and Colo 205 cells but did not increase the cytotoxicity of other investigated cancer cells. Nanocomplexes of GO-Pt increased the apoptosis of MCF-7 and HepG2 cancer cells, while the GO treatment did not affect the apoptosis.
The obtained results suggest that the nanocomplex of GO-Pt is a noteworthy nanostructure that can improve the delivery of Pt nanoparticles into cancer cells and has potential anticancer applications.

2. Title: The application to cancer immunotherapy with the recombinant bifidobacteria secreting TNF-α in mouse melanoma model
Authors: Kato Masakazu, Yuichiro Taira, Ikuko Taira, Shimizu Yoshimi, Isoda Katuhiro, Hiromi Saitou, Isao Ishida
Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is known to induce the apoptosis on various tumor cells. But cancer treatments by the systemic administration of TNF-α has been unsuccessful because of severe harmful side effects, such as hepatic dysfunction, and thus the application of TNF-α protein preparation to cancer therapy should be delivered exclusively to the tumor tissue. In this report, we will describe about recombinant Bifidobacteria as the drug delivery carrier for the tumor tissues. Bifidobacteria, widely known as one of “good bacteria”, are anaerobic gram-positive bacteria found in the normal bacterial flora. When they are administered directly into the blood stream, they can strictly enter into the hypoxygenic tumor tissues by their anaerobicity and enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. According to these properties of Bifidobacteria, we have invented the clone of TNF-α-expressing recombinant Bifidobacteria, named M4, as the vehicle for TNF-α protein. M4 could secrete TNF-α protein which has an almost equal physiological activity to that of commercially available purified specimen. Intravenously administered M4 exhibited an anti-tumor activity against several mice or human tumor cell lines in vivo. In the M4 bacteria-administered syngenic tumor bearing mice models, the number of CD8-positive cells in their tumor tissues was significantly increased. This indicates that immune cells were gathered by TNF-α protein secreted by recombinant M4 bacteria in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that the Bifidobacterial clone M4 could exhibit anti-tumor activity by the chemoattraction of immune cells into the tumor cells as well as the apoptosis-inducing activity. Since no significant harmful effect was observed in M4 bacteria-administered mice, the recombinant Bifodobacteria will be a possible therapeutic option for delivering TNF-α protein to treat cancer.

3. Title: Silver, gold, and iron oxide nanoparticles alter miRNA expression but do not affect DNA methylation in HepG2 cells.
Authors: Kamil Brzóska, Iwona Grądzka, Marcin Kruszewski^
Abstract: The increasing use of nanoparticles (NPs) in various applications entails the need for reliable assessment of their potential toxicity for humans. Originally, studies concerning NPs toxicity focused on cytotoxic and genotoxic effects but more recently, attention has been paid on epigenetic changes induced by nanoparticles. In the present research, we analyse the DNA methylation status of genes related to inflammation and apoptosis as well as expression of miRNAs related to these processes in response to silver (AgNPs), gold (AuNPs), and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) at low cytotoxic doses in HepG2 cells. There were no significant differences between treated and control cells in the DNA methylation status. We have identified nine miRNAs which expression was significantly altered by treatment with nanoparticles. The highest number of changes has been induced by AgNPs (6 miRNAs), followed by AuNPs (4 miRNAs) and SPIONs (2 miRNAs). Among others, AgNPs suppressed miR-34a expression that is of particular interest, since it may be responsible for the previously observed AgNPs-mediated HepG2 cells sensitisation to TNF. Most of the miRNAs affected by NPs treatment in the present study have been previously shown to inhibit cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. However, based on the observed changes in miRNA expression we cannot draw definite conclusions regarding pro- or antitumoral nature of NPs under study. Further research is needed to fully elucidate the relation between observed changes in miRNA expression and NPs effects observed on the cellular level. The results of the present study support the idea of including epigenetic testing during the toxicological assessment of the biological interaction of nanomaterials.



 

Materials EISSN 1996-1944 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top