Special Issue "Biofunctionalized Scaffold in Regenerative Medicine"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesca Diomede
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departmento of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, University "G d'Annunzio" Chieti, Italy
Interests: ranslational medicine; stem cells biology; oral stem cells; regenerative medicine
Dr. Jacopo Pizzicannella
E-Mail
Guest Editor
ASL02 Lanciano-Vasto Chieti, Ss. Annunziata Hospital, Chieti, Italy
Interests: translational medicine; stem cells biology; oral stem cells; regenerative medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of a biofunctionalized scaffold with cells and/or soluble factors has emerged as a promising approach in the field of regenerative medicine. A biomaterial refers to a matrix that provides a specific environment and support growth and development. An ideal scaffold must be biocompatible and non-toxic, and should improve cell viability, cell adhesion, and proliferation. Different scaffolds can be combined with cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can promote bone regeneration through the differentiation towards the osteogenic lineage or the release of specific soluble factors, or scaffolds can be primed with soluble molecules, including growth factors that can be delivered in the environment, performing a therapeutic action.

The aim of this Special Issue is to give an overview of ongoing scientific research to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue regeneration and the evaluation of the aptitude of biofunctionalized scaffold for future clinical applications. In vitro and/or in vivo studies could have a substantial impact on the development of stem cell-based regeneration strategies and in the identification of the key biological regulation processes.

Dr. Francesca Diomede
Dr. Jacopo Pizzicannella
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Regenerative medicine
  • Tissue engineering
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • 3D-construct

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
3D Human Periodontal Stem Cells and Endothelial Cells Promote Bone Development in Bovine Pericardium-Based Tissue Biomaterial
Materials 2019, 12(13), 2157; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12132157 - 05 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Bone defects repair represents a public and urgent problem in clinical practice, in fact, every year, more than two million patients required new treatments for bone injuries. Today a complete vascularization is strategic in bone formation, representing a new frontier for clinical application. [...] Read more.
Bone defects repair represents a public and urgent problem in clinical practice, in fact, every year, more than two million patients required new treatments for bone injuries. Today a complete vascularization is strategic in bone formation, representing a new frontier for clinical application. Aim of this research has been developed a three-dimensional (3D) coculture platform using a bovine pericardium collagen membrane (BioR) loaded with human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) and endothelial differentiated cells from hPDLSCs (E-hPDLSCs) able to undergo toward osteoangiogenesis differentiation process. First, we have characterized at confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) level the E-hPDLSCs phenotype profile, through CD31 and CD34 markers expression and the ability to tube vessel formation. Real Time-Polimerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting analyses revealed the upregulation of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), Collagen 1A1 (COL1A1), Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) genes and proteins in the living construct composed by hPDLSCs + E-hPDSCs/BioR. Human PDLSCs + E-hPDLSCs/BioR construct showed also an enhacement of de novo synthesis of osteocalcin. Given that, the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) transduction signaling was involved in the osteogenesis and angiogenesis process, the ERK1/2 protein level at biochemical level, in our experimental model, has been investigated. Our results evidenced an upregulation of ERK1/2 proteins level born in the living construct. In conclusion, we believe that the use of the hPDLSCs and E-hPDLSCs coculture togheter with BioR as substrate, could represent an efficient model able to activate through ERK1/2 signaling pathway the osteoangiogenesis process, and then representing a new potential engineered platform for surgeons during the repair and the healing of bone defects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofunctionalized Scaffold in Regenerative Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Fluid Cartilage as New Autologous Biomaterial in the Treatment of Minor Nose Defects: Clinical and Microscopic Difference Amongst Diced, Crushed, and Fluid Cartilage
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1062; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071062 - 31 Mar 2019
Abstract
Developing cartilage constructs with injectability, appropriate matrix composition, and persistent cartilaginous phenotype remains an enduring challenge in cartilage repair. Fourteen patients with minor contour deformity were treated with fluid cartilage filler gently injected as autologous fluid graft in deep planes of defect of [...] Read more.
Developing cartilage constructs with injectability, appropriate matrix composition, and persistent cartilaginous phenotype remains an enduring challenge in cartilage repair. Fourteen patients with minor contour deformity were treated with fluid cartilage filler gently injected as autologous fluid graft in deep planes of defect of the nose that were close to the bone or the cartilage. A computerized tomographic scan control was performed after 12 months. Pearson’s Chi-square test was used to investigate differences in cartilage density between native and newly formed cartilages. The endpoints were the possibility of using fluid cartilage as filler with aesthetic and functional improvement and versatility. Patients were followed up for two years. The constructs of fluid cartilage graft that were injected in the deep plane resulted in a persistent cartilage tissue with appropriate morphology, adequate central nutritional perfusion without central necrosis or ossification, and further augmented nasal dorsum without obvious contraction and deformation. This report demonstrated that fluid cartilage grafts are useful for cartilage regeneration in patients with outcomes of rhinoplasty, internal nasal valve collapse, and minor congenital nose aesthetics deformity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofunctionalized Scaffold in Regenerative Medicine)
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