Special Issue "Fish Gelatins: Their Production, Functional Properties, and Potential Applications in Food, Cosmetics, Pharmaceuticals, and Nutraceuticals"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 22 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Chun-Yung Huang

Guest Editor
National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Interests: brown seaweed; chitin/chitosan; extrusion technology; fish gelatin; fucoidan
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Yong-Han Hong
Website
Guest Editor
I-Shou University (Yanchao Campus), Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Interests: nutritional biochemistry and immunology; animal models related with nutrition and disease; cell culture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,                

Gelatin is a polypeptide derived by the partial hydrolysis of collagen, the principle fibrous protein constituent of the bones, cartilages, and skin of animals. Insoluble native collagen must be pre-treated before it can be converted into a form suitable for extraction; this pre-treatment is normally accomplished by heating in water, which cleaves hydrogen and covalent bonds destabilizing the triple-helix and resulting in helix-to-coil transition and conversion into soluble gelatin. Gelatin is traditionally extracted from the skin and bone collagen of certain mammalian species, primarily cows and pigs. However, gelatin production from alternative non-mammalian species has grown in importance due to religious sentiments and safety considerations, especially, concern about bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). These socio-cultural and safety concerns have promoted rigorous research to identify and develop alternatives to mammal-derived gelatin.

The classical applications of gelatin in the food, photographic, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries are based mainly on its gel-forming and viscoelastic properties. Recently, a variety of new applications of gelatin have been found in the production of emulsifiers, foaming agents, colloid stabilizers, fining agents, biodegradable packaging materials, and micro-encapsulating agents. This Special Issue “Fish Gelatins: Their Production, Functional Properties, and Potential Applications in Food, Cosmetics, Pharmaceuticals, and Neutraceuticals” of Marine Drugs will cover the whole scope of production, functional properties, and potential applications of fish gelatin in food, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. This Special Issue is focused on (but not limited to) food, cosmetic, nutraceutical, and therapeutic applications of fish gelatin, including gelatin hydrolysate, with biological activities, gelatin peptides, and proteins, nutraceutical delivery systems, gelatin nanoparticles, micro-encapsulating agents, and their complementary therapeutic effects.

We look forward to your input.

Prof. Dr. Chun-Yung Huang
Prof. Dr. Yong-Han Hong
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biological functions
  • biopolymer
  • complementary therapeutic effects
  • drug delivery systems
  • extraction method
  • fish gelatin
  • gelatin hydrolysate
  • gelatin peptides
  • micro-encapsulating agents
  • nutraceuticals
  • cosmetics
  • pharmaceuticals

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Type II Collagen from Cartilage of Acipenser baerii Promotes Wound Healing in Human Dermal Fibroblasts and in Mouse Skin
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(10), 511; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18100511 - 11 Oct 2020
Abstract
Type II collagen is an important component of cartilage; however, little is known about its effect on skin wound healing. In this study, type II collagen was extracted from the cartilage of Acipenser baerii and its effect on in vitro and in vivo [...] Read more.
Type II collagen is an important component of cartilage; however, little is known about its effect on skin wound healing. In this study, type II collagen was extracted from the cartilage of Acipenser baerii and its effect on in vitro and in vivo wound healing was compared to type I collagen derived from tilapia skin. Sturgeon cartilage collagen (SCC) was composed of α1 chains and with a thermal denaturation (Td) at 22.5 and melting temperature (Tm) at 72.5 °C. Coating SCC potentiated proliferation, migration, and invasion of human dermal fibroblast adult (HDFa) cells. Furthermore, SCC upregulated the gene expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components (col Iα1, col IIIα1, elastin, and Has2) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) molecules (N-cadherin, Snail, and MMP-1) in HDFa. Pretreatment with Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors significantly attenuated the HDFa invasion caused by SCC. In mice, the application of SCC on dorsal wounds effectively facilitated wound healing as evidenced by 40–59% wound contraction, whereas the untreated wounds were 18%. We observed that SCC reduced inflammation, promoted granulation, tissue formation, and ECM deposition, as well as re-epithelialization in skin wounds. In addition, SCC markedly upregulated the production of growth factors in the dermis, and dermal and subcutaneous white adipose tissue; in contrast, the administration of tilapia skin collagen (TSC) characterized by typical type I collagen was mainly expressed in the epidermis. Collectively, these findings indicate SCC accelerated wound healing by targeting fibroblast in vitro and in vivo. Full article
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