Special Issue "Marine Compounds from the Far Eastern Organisms"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 7472

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sergey A. Dyshlovoy
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Guest Editor
1. Laboratory of Pharmacology, A.V. Zhirmunsky National Scientific Center of Marine Biology, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok, Russia
2. Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Department of Oncology, Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation with Section Pneumology, Hubertus Wald-Tumorzentrum, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
3. Martini-Klinik, Prostate Cancer Center, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
Interests: marine natural compounds; secondary metabolites; anticancer activity; mechanism of action; autophagy; drug combinational studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Hiroshi Tomoda
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Guest Editor
Drug Discovery Laboratory, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kitasato University, 5-9-1 Shirokane, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8641, Japan
Interests: microbial chemistry; lipid biochemistry; drug discovery; natural product
Dr. Timofey V. Malyarenko
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Guest Editor
1 G.B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok, Russia
2 School of Natural Science, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia
Interests: bioorganic chemistry; chemistry of natural and physiologically active compounds; steroids; sea stars; secondary metabolites
Dr. Olesya I. Zhuravleva
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Guest Editor
1 School of Natural Science, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia
2 G.B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok, Russia
Interests: natural products chemistry; bioactive compounds from marine fungi; secondary metabolites
Dr. Maxim E. Zhidkov
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Guest Editor
School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russian Federation
Interests: medicinal chemistry; total synthesis of natural products; marine alkaloids; organic chemistry; mechanisms of organic reactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The term “Far East” implies a huge geographical region that consists of Eastern Russia, and Eastern and Southeastern Asia, and includes the waters of two oceans—the Pacific and Indian. Over 20 countries are considered to be part of this region, many of which have access to the sea, and therefore are actively involved in the research of the marine inhabitants and its metabolites. Compounds isolated from Far Eastern organisms are a significant and very important part of the whole pool of marine-derived substances—both new and previously known—bearing a unique chemical structure as well as an impressive spectrum of promising biological activities.

The Special Issue “Marine Compounds from the Far Eastern Organisms” of Marine Drugs will cover the whole scope of the molecules, both novel and previously characterized, isolated from the marine organisms inhabiting the Far Eastern region. This Special Issue is focused on the structure elucidation, chemistry, and diversity, as well as the various biological activities of these compounds. We are looking forward to interesting manuscripts related to this exciting topic!

Dr. Sergey A. Dyshlovoy
Prof. Dr. Hiroshi Tomoda
Dr. Timofey V. Malyarenko
Dr. Olesya I. Zhuravleva
Dr. Maxim E. Zhidkov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Far East
  • Pacific Ocean
  • Indian ocean
  • marine natural products
  • metabolites
  • isolation
  • structure
  • biological activity

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Study of Structure–Activity Relationships of the Marine Alkaloid Fascaplysin and Its Derivatives as Potent Anticancer Agents
Mar. Drugs 2022, 20(3), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/md20030185 - 02 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1297
Abstract
Marine alkaloid fascaplysin and its derivatives are known to exhibit promising anticancer properties in vitro and in vivo. However, toxicity of these molecules to non-cancer cells was identified as a main limitation for their clinical use. Here, for the very first time, we [...] Read more.
Marine alkaloid fascaplysin and its derivatives are known to exhibit promising anticancer properties in vitro and in vivo. However, toxicity of these molecules to non-cancer cells was identified as a main limitation for their clinical use. Here, for the very first time, we synthesized a library of fascaplysin derivatives covering all possible substituent introduction sites, i.e., cycles A, C and E of the 12H-pyrido[1-2-a:3,4-b’]diindole system. Their selectivity towards human prostate cancer versus non-cancer cells, as well as the effects on cellular metabolism, membrane integrity, cell cycle progression, apoptosis induction and their ability to intercalate into DNA were investigated. A pronounced selectivity for cancer cells was observed for the family of di- and trisubstituted halogen derivatives (modification of cycles A and E), while a modification of cycle C resulted in a stronger activity in therapy-resistant PC-3 cells. Among others, 3,10-dibromofascaplysin exhibited the highest selectivity, presumably due to the cytostatic effects executed via the targeting of cellular metabolism. Moreover, an introduction of radical substituents at C-9, C-10 or C-10 plus C-3 resulted in a notable reduction in DNA intercalating activity and improved selectivity. Taken together, our research contributes to understanding the structure–activity relationships of fascaplysin alkaloids and defines further directions of the structural optimization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Compounds from the Far Eastern Organisms)
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Article
New Tripeptide Derivatives Asterripeptides A–C from Vietnamese Mangrove-Derived Fungus Aspergillus terreus LM.5.2
Mar. Drugs 2022, 20(1), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/md20010077 - 17 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 939
Abstract
Three new tripeptide derivatives asterripeptides A–C (13) were isolated from Vietnamese mangrove-derived fungus Aspergillus terreus LM.5.2. Structures of isolated compounds were determined by a combination of NMR and ESIMS techniques. The absolute configurations of all stereocenters were determined using [...] Read more.
Three new tripeptide derivatives asterripeptides A–C (13) were isolated from Vietnamese mangrove-derived fungus Aspergillus terreus LM.5.2. Structures of isolated compounds were determined by a combination of NMR and ESIMS techniques. The absolute configurations of all stereocenters were determined using the Murfey’s method. The isolated compounds 13 contain a rare fungi cinnamic acid residue. The cytotoxicity of isolated compounds against several cancer cell lines and inhibition ability of sortase A from Staphylococcus aureus of asterripeptides A–C were investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Compounds from the Far Eastern Organisms)
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Article
Deep-Sea Anemones Are Prospective Source of New Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Compounds
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(12), 654; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19120654 - 24 Nov 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 929
Abstract
The peculiarities of the survival and adaptation of deep-sea organisms raise interest in the study of their metabolites as promising drugs. In this work, the hemolytic, cytotoxic, antimicrobial, and enzyme-inhibitory activities of tentacle extracts from five species of sea anemones (Cnidaria, orders Actiniaria [...] Read more.
The peculiarities of the survival and adaptation of deep-sea organisms raise interest in the study of their metabolites as promising drugs. In this work, the hemolytic, cytotoxic, antimicrobial, and enzyme-inhibitory activities of tentacle extracts from five species of sea anemones (Cnidaria, orders Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia) collected near the Kuril and Commander Islands of the Far East of Russia were evaluated for the first time. The extracts of Liponema brevicorne and Actinostola callosa demonstrated maximal hemolytic activity, while high cytotoxic activity against murine splenocytes and Ehrlich carcinoma cells was found in the extract of Actinostola faeculenta. The extracts of Corallimorphus cf. pilatus demonstrated the greatest activity against Ehrlich carcinoma cells but were not toxic to mouse spleen cells. Sea anemones C. cf. pilatus and Stomphia coccinea are promising sources of antimicrobial and antifungal compounds, being active against Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and yeast Candida albicans. Moreover, all sea anemones contain α-galactosidase inhibitors. Peptide mass fingerprinting of L. brevicorne and C. cf. pilatus extracts provided a wide range of peptides, predominantly with molecular masses of 4000–5900 Da, which may belong to a known or new structural class of toxins. The obtained data allow concluding that deep-sea anemones are a promising source of compounds for drug discovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Compounds from the Far Eastern Organisms)
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Article
New Deoxyisoaustamide Derivatives from the Coral-Derived Fungus Penicillium dimorphosporum KMM 4689
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19010032 - 12 Jan 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2000
Abstract
Seven new deoxyisoaustamide derivatives (17) together with known compounds (810) were isolated from the coral-derived fungus Penicillium dimorphosporum KMM 4689. Their structures were established using spectroscopic methods, X-ray diffraction analysis and by comparison with related [...] Read more.
Seven new deoxyisoaustamide derivatives (17) together with known compounds (810) were isolated from the coral-derived fungus Penicillium dimorphosporum KMM 4689. Their structures were established using spectroscopic methods, X-ray diffraction analysis and by comparison with related known compounds. The absolute configurations of some alkaloids were determined based on CD and NOESY data as well as biogenetic considerations. The cytotoxic and neuroprotective activities of some of the isolated compounds were examined and structure-activity relationships were pointed out. New deoxyisoaustamides 46 at concentration of 1 µM revealed a statistical increase of PQ(paraquat)-treated Neuro-2a cell viability by 30–39%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Compounds from the Far Eastern Organisms)
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Article
N-Docosahexaenoylethanolamine Attenuates Neuroinflammation and Improves Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Rats with Sciatic Nerve Chronic Constriction Injury
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(10), 516; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18100516 - 15 Oct 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1501
Abstract
Chronic neuropathic pain is a condition that causes both sensory disturbances and a variety of functional disorders, indicating the involvement of various brain structures in pain pathogenesis. One of the factors underlying chronic neuropathic pain is neuroinflammation, which is accompanied by microglial activation [...] Read more.
Chronic neuropathic pain is a condition that causes both sensory disturbances and a variety of functional disorders, indicating the involvement of various brain structures in pain pathogenesis. One of the factors underlying chronic neuropathic pain is neuroinflammation, which is accompanied by microglial activation and pro-inflammatory factor release. N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine (DHEA, synaptamide) is an endocannabinoid-like metabolite synthesized endogenously from docosahexaenoic acid. Synaptamide exhibits anti-inflammatory activity and improves neurite outgrowth, neurogenesis, and synaptogenesis within the hippocampus. This study aims to evaluate the effects of synaptamide obtained by the chemical modification of DHA, extracted from the Far Eastern raw material Berryteuthis magister on neuroinflammatory response and hippocampal neurogenesis changes during neuropathic pain. The study of microglial protein and cytokine concentrations was performed using immunohistochemistry and ELISA. The brain lipid analysis was performed using the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. Behavioral experiments showed that synaptamide prevented neuropathic pain-associated sensory and behavioral changes, such as thermal allodynia, impaired locomotor activity, working and long-term memory, and increased anxiety. Synaptamide attenuated microglial activation, release of proinflammatory cytokines, and decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis. Lipid analysis revealed changes in the brain N-acylethanolamines composition and plasmalogen concentration after synaptamide administration. In conclusion, we show here that synaptamide may have potential for use in preventing or treating neuropathic cognitive pain and emotional effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Compounds from the Far Eastern Organisms)
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