Special Issue "Selected Papers from 4th International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ming Du

Guest Editor
School of Food Science and Technology, National Engineering Research Center of Seafood, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034, China
Interests: bioactive peptides; food chemistry; nutrition; metabolism; functional foods; biotransformation; bioactivity
Prof. Dr. Esra Capanoglu
grade Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, Istanbul 34469, Turkey
Interests: phenolics, antioxidants, metabolites, in vitro bioaccessibility, fruit and vegetable processing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Rosa Tundis
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci, Edificio Polifunzionale, 87036 Arcavacata Rende (CS), Italy
Interests: natural products; enzymes inhibition; functional foods; chemical analysis; antioxidants
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, which is related to the 4th International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (4-ISPMF, Xi’an, Novermber 30-December 04, 2020, https://381313990.wixsite.com/4-ispmf), seeks updated and new knowledge on natural products from the marine environment. Marine drugs and functional foods have received increasing attention due to their considerable benefits for human health. This Special Issue will shape the future research direction of important marine bioresources. Our purpose is to feature high-quality, advanced research and knowledge contributed by various research groups working on natural marine products from all around the world. We invite researchers to contribute reviews and reports of their recent work on the functional and nutritional properties of natural products from the marine environment, as well as related biotechnological improvements. Please note that registration for the 4rd International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food is required for acceptance.

This Special Issue will focus on natural products from the marine environment, including the following aspects:

  1. Natural products from the marine environment for preventing and managing modern diseases;
  2. The importance of functional foods from the marine environment for human health;
  3. Bioactivity and function of edible marine plants and animals;
  4. New strategies of using marine drugs for promoting human health;
  5. Pharmacokinetics and biotransformation of marine drugs;
  6. Biotechnology for yielding bioactive components from the marine environment.

Prof. Dr. Ming Du
Prof. Dr. Esra Capanoglu
Prof. Dr. Rosa Tundis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural products from marine life
  • edible marine plants and animals
  • natural products
  • bioactive peptides
  • food chemistry
  • nutrition
  • metabolism
  • prevention
  • chemoprevention
  • functional food
  • pharmacokinetics
  • biotransformation
  • bioactivity
  • structure–activity relationship

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Physical Properties of Composite Films from Tilapia Skin Collagen with Pachyrhizus Starch and Rambutan Peel Phenolics
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(12), 662; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17120662 - 25 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Different composite films composed of tilapia skin collagen (TSC) with Pachyrhizus starch (PS) or rambutan peel phenolics (RPP) were prepared, and the physical properties of these films were determined. The effects of PS and RPP on TSC films were investigated, and our results [...] Read more.
Different composite films composed of tilapia skin collagen (TSC) with Pachyrhizus starch (PS) or rambutan peel phenolics (RPP) were prepared, and the physical properties of these films were determined. The effects of PS and RPP on TSC films were investigated, and our results indicated that PS and RPP could improve the physical properties of TSC films. Opacity and film thickness showed an enhanced trend with increasing PS and RPP contents in TSC films, whereas solubility in water, elongation-at-break (EAB), and water vapor permeability (WVP) showed declining trends. TSC film with 10% PS and 0.5% RPP had the highest tensile strength, and the tensile strength dropped drastically when the content of PS and RPP increased. The light transmittances of the films could decrease with the incorporation of PS and RPP. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) demonstrated that the addition of PS and RPP improved the thermal stability of TSC films. In addition, X-ray diffraction indicated that the crystallinity of the films decreased and the amorphous structure of the films tended to become more complex with the addition of PS and RPP. As shown by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, PS and RPP can strongly interact with TSC, resulting in a modification of its structure. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed that there was a good compatibility between TSC, PS, and RPP. The results indicated that TSC film incorporated with 10% PS and 0.5% RPP was an effective method for improve the physical properties of the film. TSC–PS–RPP composite films can be used not only in biomedical applications, but also as active food packaging materials. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Inhibition Effect of Triglyceride Accumulation by Large Yellow Croaker Roe DHA-PC in HepG2 Cells
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(9), 485; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17090485 - 21 Aug 2019
Abstract
The phospholipids (PLs) of large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea, P. crocea) roe contain a high level of polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which can lower blood lipid levels. In previous research, PLs of P. crocea roe were found [...] Read more.
The phospholipids (PLs) of large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea, P. crocea) roe contain a high level of polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which can lower blood lipid levels. In previous research, PLs of P. crocea roe were found able to regulate the accumulation of triglycerides. However, none of these involve the function of DHA-containing phosphatidylcholine (DHA-PC), which is the main component of PLs derived from P. crocea roe. The function by which DHA-PC from P. crocea roe exerts its effects has not yet been clarified. Herein, we used purified DHA-PC and oleic acid (OA) induced HepG2 cells to establish a high-fat model, and the cell activity and intracellular lipid levels were then measured. The mRNA and protein expression of Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS), Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 1A (CPT1A) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in HepG2 cells were detected via RT-qPCR and western blot as well. It was found that DHA-PC can significantly regulate triglyceride accumulation in HepG2 cells, the effect of which was related to the activation of PPARα receptor activity, upregulation of CPT1A, and downregulation of FAS expression. These results can improve the understanding of the biofunction of hyperlipidemia mediated by DHA-PC from P. crocea roe, as well as provide a theoretical basis for the utilization of DHA-PC from P. crocea roe as a functional food additive. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Zinc-Chelating Mechanism of Sea Cucumber (Stichopus japonicus)-Derived Synthetic Peptides
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(8), 438; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17080438 - 25 Jul 2019
Abstract
In this study, three synthetic zinc-chelating peptides (ZCPs) derived from sea cucumber hydrolysates with limited or none of the common metal-chelating amino-acid residues were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, zeta-potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy [...] Read more.
In this study, three synthetic zinc-chelating peptides (ZCPs) derived from sea cucumber hydrolysates with limited or none of the common metal-chelating amino-acid residues were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, zeta-potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The amount of zinc bound to the ZCPs reached maximum values with ZCP:zinc at 1:1, and it was not further increased by additional zinc presence. The secondary structures of ZCPs were slightly altered, whereas no formation of multimers was observed. Furthermore, zinc increased the zeta-potential value by neutralizing the negatively charged residues. Only free carboxyl in C-terminus of ZCPs was identified as the primary binding site of zinc. These results provide the theoretical foundation to understand the mechanism of zinc chelation by peptides. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Phlorotannins from Undaria pinnatifida Sporophyll: Extraction, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(8), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17080434 - 24 Jul 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Undaria pinnatifida sporophyll (U. pinnatifida) is a major byproduct of U. pinnatifida (a brown algae) processing. Its phenolic constituents, phlorotannins, are of special interest due to their intrinsic ability to precipitate proteins. Herein, a high-temperature extraction procedure was used to isolate [...] Read more.
Undaria pinnatifida sporophyll (U. pinnatifida) is a major byproduct of U. pinnatifida (a brown algae) processing. Its phenolic constituents, phlorotannins, are of special interest due to their intrinsic ability to precipitate proteins. Herein, a high-temperature extraction procedure was used to isolate these biologically active compounds. The heating temperature, heating time, and extraction solvent (ethanol) concentration were examined with response surface analysis to determine the optimal conditions to achieve the maximum extraction rate. The analysis revealed the optimal conditions to be: 170 °C of heating temperature, 5.2 h of heating time, and 52% ethanol concentration for a yield of 10.7 ± 0.2 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry weight (GAE/g DW) of sample. Compared to epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the extracted phlorotannins displayed higher antioxidant activity on H2O2-induced RAW 264.7 cells with improved efficiency. Furthermore, the compounds exhibited strong anti-inflammatory activity. These findings potentially can be utilized to guide development of novel functional foods and food supplements from sea-originated resources such as brown algae. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Quantitative Proteome Reveals Variation in the Condition Factor of Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus during the Fishing Season Using an iTRAQ-based Approach
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(7), 397; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17070397 - 05 Jul 2019
Abstract
To investigate the variation in the condition factor of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus (S. nudus), gonads were collected in May (MAY), June (JUN), and July (JUL), at the beginning (AUG-b) and end of August (AUG-e). Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel [...] Read more.
To investigate the variation in the condition factor of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus (S. nudus), gonads were collected in May (MAY), June (JUN), and July (JUL), at the beginning (AUG-b) and end of August (AUG-e). Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) detection of the gonads revealed an obvious enhancement of the band at about 37 kDa from July, which was identified as transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein ig-h3 (TGFBI) by nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS. Gonadal proteins were identified by isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), and regulation of the identified proteins in pairs of the collected groups was observed. A total of 174 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were identified. Seven of the DEPs showed significant correlations with both the gonad index (GI) and protein content. These correlations included 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, decarboxylating isoform X2 (6PGD), CAD protein, myoferlin isoform X8, ribosomal protein L36 (RL36), isocitrate dehydrogenase [NADP], mitochondrial isoform X2 (IDH), multifunctional protein ADE2 isoform X3, sperm-activating peptides (SAPs) and aldehyde dehydrogenase, and mitochondrial (ALDH). However, TGFBI had no correlation with gonad index (GI) or protein content. 6PGD, IDH, multifunctional protein ADE2 isoform X3, and ALDH were shown to interact with each other and might play key roles in changing the condition factor of S. nudus gonads. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Rational Design of Alginate Lyase from Microbulbifer sp. Q7 to Improve Thermal Stability
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(6), 378; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17060378 - 25 Jun 2019
Cited by 7
Abstract
Alginate lyase degrades alginate by the β-elimination mechanism to produce oligosaccharides with special bioactivities. The low thermal stability of alginate lyase limits its industrial application. In this study, introducing the disulfide bonds while using the rational design methodology enhanced the thermal stability of [...] Read more.
Alginate lyase degrades alginate by the β-elimination mechanism to produce oligosaccharides with special bioactivities. The low thermal stability of alginate lyase limits its industrial application. In this study, introducing the disulfide bonds while using the rational design methodology enhanced the thermal stability of alginate lyase cAlyM from Microbulbifer sp. Q7. Enzyme catalytic sites, secondary structure, spatial configuration, and molecular dynamic simulation were comprehensively analyzed. When compared with cAlyM, the mutants D102C-A300C and G103C-T113C showed an increase by 2.25 and 1.16 h, respectively, in half-life time at 45 °C, in addition to increases by 1.7 °C and 0.4 °C in the melting temperature, respectively. The enzyme-specific activity and kcat/Km values of D102C-A300C were 1.8- and 1.5-times higher than those of cAlyM, respectively. The rational design strategy that was used in this study provides a valuable method for improving the thermal stability of the alginate lyase. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Advances in Molecular Docking for the Research and Discovery of Potential Marine Drugs
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(11), 545; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18110545 - 30 Oct 2020
Abstract
Marine drugs have long been used and exhibit unique advantages in clinical practices. Among the marine drugs that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the protein–ligand interactions, such as cytarabine–DNA polymerase, vidarabine–adenylyl cyclase, and eribulin–tubulin complexes, are the important [...] Read more.
Marine drugs have long been used and exhibit unique advantages in clinical practices. Among the marine drugs that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the protein–ligand interactions, such as cytarabine–DNA polymerase, vidarabine–adenylyl cyclase, and eribulin–tubulin complexes, are the important mechanisms of action for their efficacy. However, the complex and multi-targeted components in marine medicinal resources, their bio-active chemical basis, and mechanisms of action have posed huge challenges in the discovery and development of marine drugs so far, which need to be systematically investigated in-depth. Molecular docking could effectively predict the binding mode and binding energy of the protein–ligand complexes and has become a major method of computer-aided drug design (CADD), hence this powerful tool has been widely used in many aspects of the research on marine drugs. This review introduces the basic principles and software of the molecular docking and further summarizes the applications of this method in marine drug discovery and design, including the early virtual screening in the drug discovery stage, drug target discovery, potential mechanisms of action, and the prediction of drug metabolism. In addition, this review would also discuss and prospect the problems of molecular docking, in order to provide more theoretical basis for clinical practices and new marine drug research and development. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Marine Natural Products: A Source of Novel Anticancer Drugs
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(9), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17090491 - 23 Aug 2019
Cited by 47
Abstract
Cancer remains one of the most lethal diseases worldwide. There is an urgent need for new drugs with novel modes of action and thus considerable research has been conducted for new anticancer drugs from natural sources, especially plants, microbes and marine organisms. Marine [...] Read more.
Cancer remains one of the most lethal diseases worldwide. There is an urgent need for new drugs with novel modes of action and thus considerable research has been conducted for new anticancer drugs from natural sources, especially plants, microbes and marine organisms. Marine populations represent reservoirs of novel bioactive metabolites with diverse groups of chemical structures. This review highlights the impact of marine organisms, with particular emphasis on marine plants, algae, bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, sponges and soft corals. Anti-cancer effects of marine natural products in in vitro and in vivo studies were first introduced; their activity in the prevention of tumor formation and the related compound-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicities were tackled. The possible molecular mechanisms behind the biological effects are also presented. The review highlights the diversity of marine organisms, novel chemical structures, and chemical property space. Finally, therapeutic strategies and the present use of marine-derived components, its future direction and limitations are discussed. Full article
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