Special Issue "Tribology in Manufacturing Process"

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kuniaki Dohda
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3111, USA
Interests: metal forming; process tribology; surface engineering; micro/meso manufacturing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the precise manufacturing of metal parts, especially for hard materials, the tribological requirements on workpiece materials and tool materials are extremely high and critical. The improvement in process tribology also helps in tool lifetime and product surface quality improvements. Additionally, in order to maintain the sustainability of manufacturing sector, development of green manufacturing processes is essential and inevitable. For the realization of future green manufacturing, process tribology improvement is playing an important role in the contribution toward manufacturing sustainability.

There are numerous research teams over the world making effort in process tribology advancement and lubricant development. In order to speed up the pace of process tribology advancement, a Special Issue is planned to gather relevant research and study together so that researchers can be benefited for their investigations. The topics of papers in this issue include, but not limit to,

  • Friction, lubrication and wear phenomena
  • New lubricants, tool materials, coatings and surface engineering
  • Tribological effects on process modeling and applied plasticity
  • Environmental issues: new user- and- environmental friendly lubricants and coatings
  • Metal forming, machining, joining and other processes

Prof. Dr. Kuniaki Dohda
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Friction
  • Wear
  • Lubricants
  • Tool materials
  • Coatings
  • Process modeling
  • Metal forming
  • Machining
  • Finishing
  • Joining
  • Casting

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Organo-Sulfur Compounds with Overbased Calcium Compounds on Lubrication in Cold Forming
Lubricants 2017, 5(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants5010008 - 16 Mar 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
The authors analyzed the structures of sulfurized olefins using NMR spectroscopy and studied the effects of sulfur chain length and alkyl structure on the ironing performance. They found that branched chain olefins, which contain branched alkyl groups, show superior ironing performance to straight [...] Read more.
The authors analyzed the structures of sulfurized olefins using NMR spectroscopy and studied the effects of sulfur chain length and alkyl structure on the ironing performance. They found that branched chain olefins, which contain branched alkyl groups, show superior ironing performance to straight chain olefins, provided that their carbon numbers are relatively low. When the sulfurized olefins were used in combination with overbased detergents (calcium sulfonate or salicylate), they showed a higher performance in ironing than with sulfurized olefins alone. It was also found that lubricating films consisting of both iron sulfide and calcium carbonate seem to improve ironing performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology in Manufacturing Process)
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Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Tool Texture on Friction and Lubrication in Strip Reduction Testing
Lubricants 2017, 5(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants5010003 - 17 Jan 2017
Cited by 12
Abstract
While texturing of workpiece surfaces to promote lubrication in metal forming has been applied for several decades, tool surface texturing is rather new. In the present paper, tool texturing is studied as a method to prevent galling. A strip reduction test was conducted [...] Read more.
While texturing of workpiece surfaces to promote lubrication in metal forming has been applied for several decades, tool surface texturing is rather new. In the present paper, tool texturing is studied as a method to prevent galling. A strip reduction test was conducted with tools provided with shallow, longitudinal pockets oriented perpendicular to the sliding direction. The pockets had small angles to the workpiece surface and the distance between them were varied. The experiments reveal that the distance between pockets should be larger than the pocket width, thereby creating a topography similar to flat table mountains to avoid mechanical interlocking in the valleys; otherwise, an increase in drawing load and pick-up on the tools are observed. The textured tool surface lowers friction and improves lubrication performance, provided that the distance between pockets is 2–4 times larger than the pocket width. Larger drawing speed facilitates escape of the entrapped lubricant in the pockets. Testing with low-to-medium viscosity oils leads to a low sheet roughness on the plateaus, but also local workpiece material pick-up on the tool plateaus. Large lubricant viscosity results in higher sheet plateau roughness, but also prevents pick-up and galling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology in Manufacturing Process)
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