Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management

A special issue of Logistics (ISSN 2305-6290).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 May 2022) | Viewed by 82890

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Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore; NUS Business School, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Interests: data science; predictive and prescriptive analytics; supply chain analytics; logistics and supply chain management; stochastic models, algorithms and optimization
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Guest Editor
School of Computer Science and Communication Engineering, JiangSu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu, China
Interests: artificial intelligence; deep learning; cloud computing; data mining; pattern recognition; communication systems; system engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world is experiencing Industry 4.0, the fourth industrial revolution. The industrial revolution began in the early years of this millennium with autonomous production using cyber-physical systems (CPS), cloud computing, Internet of things (IoT), Internet of services (IoS), and augmented reality. Since then, Industry 4.0 has greatly influenced daily life in every aspect, from shopping to dining, from working to entertaining, etc. It is changing people’s lifestyles and living behaviors, and even thinking and mindsets. Industry 4.0 has had a revolutionary impact on supply chain management. In the environment of Industry 4.0, suppliers are intelligent, factories are smart, products are smart, and customers demand all-around greater satisfaction from services. This digitization enables the integration of processes and systems across companies and industrial sectors, and creates new business models and value generation opportunities. Enterprises and businesses are digitalized, profitable, and sustainable. Manufacturing systems and services are real-time capable, interoperable, modular, decentralized, virtualized, and service-oriented. Supply Chains are fully visible, connected, and integrated. With the rapid growth of Industry 4.0 technologies, supply chain management is being transformed into a new generation, Supply Chain 4.0.

Supply Chain 4.0 refers to the supply chain operating in the environment of Industry 4.0, which is designed, planned, managed, and optimized using Industry 4.0 technologies to maximize customer satisfaction with minimal operational cost and minimal environmental impact. The distinguishing attributes of Supply Chain 4.0 include visibility, connectivity, coordination, synchronization, autonomy, resilience, sustainability, and optimality. There are many research issues and challenges associated with Supply Chain 4.0, for example, how to leverage real-time market intelligence to model customer behaviors and more accurately predict future customer demand? How to base on Data Analytics to stock minimal inventory to maximize customer service level? How to apply artificial intelligence and machine learning to allocate production capacity, schedule job orders, and plan equipment maintenance to minimize the disruption of production lines? How to utilize Industry 4.0 technologies to select the right supplier for the right material at the right time? How to tap into blockchain technology to share the data and essential information among the parties across a supply chain? How to collaborate and coordinate the operations of supply chain partners in the environment of Industry 4.0? This Special Issue calls for accomplishments and contributions from academia and industry to address Supply Chain 4.0 issues and challenges. Original papers on, but not limited to, the following topics are welcome:

  • Additive manufacturing supply chain management
  • Autonomous warehouse systems
  • Big data analytics
  • Collaborative supply chain management
  • Consumer behavior modeling and prediction
  • Data-driven sales & operations planning (S&OP)
  • Data-driven SCOR models
  • Digital supply chain management
  • End to end supply chain integration
  • Intelligent demand forecasting
  • Intelligent manufacturing systems
  • Intelligent transportation systems
  • Inventory track and trace
  • Predictive maintenance systems
  • Predictive inventory management and optimization
  • Real-time supply chain synchronization and coordination
  • Resilient supply chain management
  • Smart products
  • Smart factories
  • Supplier selection intelligence
  • Supply chain analytics
  • Supply chain optimization
  • Supply chain visibility and connectivity
  • Sustainable supply chain management

Dr. Xue-Ming Yuan
Prof. Dr. Anrong Xue
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Logistics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Industry 4.0
  • supply chain management and optimization
  • Supply Chain 4.0
  • supply chain analytics
  • supply chain visibility and connectivity
  • supply chain synchronization and coordination

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Editorial

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4 pages, 158 KiB  
Editorial
Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management
by Xue-Ming Yuan and Anrong Xue
Logistics 2023, 7(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics7010009 - 1 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3372
Abstract
Industry 4 [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management)

Research

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20 pages, 6610 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Status of SMEs in Jordan with Respect to Industry 4.0: A Pilot Study
by Maram I. Shqair and Safwan A. Altarazi
Logistics 2022, 6(4), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics6040069 - 28 Sep 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4607
Abstract
Background: Industry 4.0 is a burgeoning research area that has been addressed by many research entities. However, the literature shows that the industrial sector lacks the awareness and knowledge needed to comply with Industry 4.0 implications, particularly in developing countries. Methods: This study [...] Read more.
Background: Industry 4.0 is a burgeoning research area that has been addressed by many research entities. However, the literature shows that the industrial sector lacks the awareness and knowledge needed to comply with Industry 4.0 implications, particularly in developing countries. Methods: This study evaluates the status of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Jordan concerning Industry 4.0. Four criteria are assessed, including Industry 4.0 readiness, maturity, drivers, and barriers. Samples of SME respondents and Industry 4.0 experts are surveyed using an online questionnaire. Results: The results show that SMEs in Jordan are not mature enough nor ready to apply Industry 4.0. For the readiness dimension, SME respondents and experts agreed that the Jordanian SMEs’ status is between having initiatives in the pilot phase or implementing concepts to low degrees, except for autonomous workpiece and smart product aspects, in which Jordanian SMEs are behind due to financial and technological reasons. It was found that none of the Industry 4.0 investigated technologies have reached maturity levels. Customer requirements, cost reduction, competitors’ practice, productivity improvement, and quality improvement are found to be the major influencing drivers for Industry 4.0, while a lack of awareness and knowledge is found to be the crucial barrier hampering Industry 4.0 implementation. Conclusions: Jordan needs country-scale initiatives for the implementation of groundbreaking Industry 4.0 development, incorporating government agencies, industrial parties, and experts, relying on Industry 4.0’s readiness and practice status as a starting point, and considering the influential drivers and barriers to steer the development process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management)
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23 pages, 6172 KiB  
Article
Quantifying the Benefits of Digital Supply Chain Twins—A Simulation Study in Organic Food Supply Chains
by Tom Binsfeld and Benno Gerlach
Logistics 2022, 6(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics6030046 - 8 Jul 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 4156
Abstract
Background: Digital supply chain twins (DSCT) are gaining increased attention in academia and practice and their positive impact on logistics and supply chain management (LSCM) performance is often highlighted. Still, LSCM executives are hesitant regarding DSCT implementation. One reason is the difficulty [...] Read more.
Background: Digital supply chain twins (DSCT) are gaining increased attention in academia and practice and their positive impact on logistics and supply chain management (LSCM) performance is often highlighted. Still, LSCM executives are hesitant regarding DSCT implementation. One reason is the difficulty of making a reasonable cost–benefit comparison, because the benefits of using a DSCT are rarely quantified. Moreover, there seems to be no method of quantifying these benefits as of today. Methods: This article builds upon an extensive simulation study of a constructed organic food supply chain (FSC), containing as many as 40 simulation experiments. In this simulation study, three volatility scenarios in the FSC were simulated and their effects on LSCM performance were measured. Subsequently, dynamic simulation experiments were run to emulate DSCT use. The benefits of using a DSCT were then quantified using a newly developed approach. Results: A conclusive method for quantifying the benefits of using a DSCT is presented and validated. Moreover, the performance evaluation of using a DSCT for the multi-echelon inventory management of an organic FSC is given. Conclusions: The study leads towards a method for quantifying the use of DSCTs that is of importance for research and practice alike. For managers, it additionally provides an exemplary application of said method in the context of organic FSCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management)
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17 pages, 1059 KiB  
Article
A Soft Computing View for the Scientific Categorization of Vegetable Supply Chain Issues
by Rizwan Abbas, Gehad Abdullah Amran, Irshad Hussain and Shengjun Ma
Logistics 2022, 6(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics6030039 - 22 Jun 2022
Viewed by 2383
Abstract
Over the most recent couple of years, the Internet of Things and other empowering innovations have been logically utilized for digitizing the vegetable supply chain (VSC). Background: The unpredictable examples and complexity inserted in enormous data dimensions present a test for an [...] Read more.
Over the most recent couple of years, the Internet of Things and other empowering innovations have been logically utilized for digitizing the vegetable supply chain (VSC). Background: The unpredictable examples and complexity inserted in enormous data dimensions present a test for an orderly human master examination. Hence in an information-driven setting, soft computing (SC) has accomplished critical energy to investigate, mine, and concentrate confidential information data, or tackle complex improvement issues, finding some harmony between good productivity and maintainability of vegetable supply frameworks. Methods: This paper presents a new and diverse scientific classification of VSC issues from the SC methodology. It characterizes VSC issues and sorts them in light of how they be demonstrated according to the SC perspective. Moreover, we examine the SC methodologies commonly utilized in each phase of the VSC and their related classes of issues. Accordingly, there is an issue in distinguishing and characterizing VSC issues according to a more extensive point of view, enveloping the different SC strategies that can apply in various phases (from creation to retailing), and recognizing the issues that emerge in these phases according to the SC viewpoint. Results: We likewise acquaint some rules with the assistance of VSC analysts and specialists to settle on appropriate strategies while resolving specific issues they could experience. Even though a few latest examinations have arranged the SC writing in this field, they are situated towards a solitary group of SC strategies (a gathering of techniques that share standard qualities) and survey their application in VSC phases. Conclusions: We have suggested a novel approach and complete scientific classification of vegetable supply chain concerns about soft computing. We present a view of three delegate supply chains: cruciferous vegetables, dark green leafy vegetables, and tomatoes. We assembled the scientific type in light of different parts to arrange vegetable supply chain issues as per how they can be demonstrated utilizing soft computing methodologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management)
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19 pages, 928 KiB  
Article
Power in the Context of SCM and Supply Chain Digitalization: An Overview from a Literature Review
by Janosch Brinker and Hans-Dietrich Haasis
Logistics 2022, 6(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics6020025 - 29 Mar 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4795
Abstract
Background: Within highly complex supply chain networks, driven by the trend of digitalization, supply chain relationship management becomes one of the central enablers in increasing supply chain performance. While the influences of globalization and digitalization on the supply chains are increasing, the [...] Read more.
Background: Within highly complex supply chain networks, driven by the trend of digitalization, supply chain relationship management becomes one of the central enablers in increasing supply chain performance. While the influences of globalization and digitalization on the supply chains are increasing, the power allocation within several markets is centralized to a small number of companies. The objective of this paper is to investigate the research gap concerning the impact of power asymmetries on the supply chain, in addition to the trend of digitalization. Methods: A literature review on power, in the research area of supply chain management and logistics, is used to synthesize the current state of the art in this research field and to provide a comprehensive definition of the concept of power. Conclusions: While this paper provides an overview of the impact of power allocations, according to supply chain digitalization and in the present research of supply chain management, it also develops a definition of Power in Supply Chain Management in general. Linked to this definition, this research elaborates on the research gap between power allocations and the digitalization of the supply chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management)
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Review

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19 pages, 2359 KiB  
Review
Impact of Internet of Things (IoT) on Inventory Management: A Literature Survey
by Yasaman Mashayekhy, Amir Babaei, Xue-Ming Yuan and Anrong Xue
Logistics 2022, 6(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics6020033 - 26 May 2022
Cited by 34 | Viewed by 23666
Abstract
Background: The advancement of Industry 4.0 technologies has affected every aspect of supply chains. Recently, enterprises have tried to create more value for their businesses by tapping into these new technologies. Warehouses have been one of the most critical sections in a [...] Read more.
Background: The advancement of Industry 4.0 technologies has affected every aspect of supply chains. Recently, enterprises have tried to create more value for their businesses by tapping into these new technologies. Warehouses have been one of the most critical sections in a supply chain affected by Industry 4.0 technologies. Methods: By recognizing the role of inventory management in a supply chain and its importance, this paper aims to highlight the impact of IoT technologies on inventory management in supply chains and conducts a comprehensive study to identify the research gap of applying IoT to inventory management. The trend and potential opportunities of applying IoT to inventory management in the Industry 4.0 era are explored by analyzing the literature. Results: Our findings show that the research on this topic is growing in various industries. A broad range of journals is paying particular attention to this topic and publishing more articles in this research direction. Conclusions: Upgrading a supply chain into an integrated supply chain 4.0 is beneficial. Given the changes in fourth-generation technology compared to previous generations, the approach of conventional inventory replenishment policies seems not responsive enough to new technologies and is not able to cope with IoT systems well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management)
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25 pages, 3305 KiB  
Review
Impact of Additive Manufacturing on the Supply Chain of Aerospace Spare Parts Industry—A Review
by Binoy Debnath, Md Shihab Shakur, Fahmida Tanjum, M. Azizur Rahman and Ziaul Haq Adnan
Logistics 2022, 6(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics6020028 - 27 Apr 2022
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 9028
Abstract
Background: Additive manufacturing (AM) applications in producing spare parts are increasing day by day. AM is bridging the digital and physical world as a 3D computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) method. The usage of AM has made the supply chain of the aviation spare parts [...] Read more.
Background: Additive manufacturing (AM) applications in producing spare parts are increasing day by day. AM is bridging the digital and physical world as a 3D computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) method. The usage of AM has made the supply chain of the aviation spare parts industry simpler, more effective, and efficient. Methods: This paper demonstrates the impacts of AM on the supply chain of the aircraft spare parts industry following a systematic literature review. Hence, centralized and decentralized structures of AM supply chains have been evaluated. Additionally, the attention has been oriented towards the supply chain with AM technologies and industry 4.0, which can support maintenance tasks and the production of spare parts in the aerospace industry. Results: This review article summarizes the interconnection of the industry findings on spare parts. It evaluates the potentiality and capability of AM in conceptualizing the overall supply chain. Moreover, MROs can adopt the proposed framework technologies to assist decision-makers in deciding whether the logistics hub with AM facilities is centralized or decentralized. Conclusions: Finally, this review provides an overall view to make critical decisions on the supply chain design of spare parts driven by new and disruptive technologies of industry 4.0. The next-generation supply chain may replace the logistics barriers by reducing waste and improving capability and sustainability by implementing AM technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management)
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0 pages, 32654 KiB  
Review
Moving from Industry 4.0 to Industry 5.0: What Are the Implications for Smart Logistics?
by Niloofar Jefroy, Mathew Azarian and Hao Yu
Logistics 2022, 6(2), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics6020026 - 1 Apr 2022
Cited by 71 | Viewed by 14337
Abstract
Background: Given the importance of human centricity, resilience, and sustainability, the emerging concept of Industry 5.0 has pushed forward the research frontier of the technology-focused Industry 4.0 to a smart and harmonious socio-economic transition driven by both humans and technologies, where the [...] Read more.
Background: Given the importance of human centricity, resilience, and sustainability, the emerging concept of Industry 5.0 has pushed forward the research frontier of the technology-focused Industry 4.0 to a smart and harmonious socio-economic transition driven by both humans and technologies, where the role of the human in the technological transformation is predominantly focused on. Several studies discuss the impacts of disruptive technologies on smart logistics operations in Industry 4.0. However, since Industry 5.0 is a new concept and still in its infancy, its implications for smart logistics have not been discussed. Methods: To fill this gap, this paper presents a comparative bibliometric analysis to show the connection and differences between Industry 4.0 and Industry 5.0 and their implications for smart logistics. A thorough content analysis is then given to illustrate the features of smart logistics in Industry 5.0 concerning four areas, namely intelligent automation, intelligent devices, intelligent systems, and intelligent materials. Results: The results show that, compared with Industry 4.0, the research of smart logistics in Industry 5.0 puts more focus on the interaction between humans and technology in the digital transition, with the increasing adoption of collaborative technologies, e.g., human-machine systems, collaborative robots, and human-robot collaboration. Conclusions: Finally, a research agenda is proposed for identifying future research directions of smart logistics in Industry 5.0. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management)
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21 pages, 2134 KiB  
Review
From Supply Chain 4.0 to Supply Chain 5.0: Findings from a Systematic Literature Review and Research Directions
by Guilherme F. Frederico
Logistics 2021, 5(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics5030049 - 9 Jul 2021
Cited by 76 | Viewed by 13543
Abstract
The main purpose of this paper is to present what the Industry 5.0 phenomenon means in the supply chain context. A systematic literature review method was used to get evidence from the current knowledge linked to this theme. The results have evidenced a [...] Read more.
The main purpose of this paper is to present what the Industry 5.0 phenomenon means in the supply chain context. A systematic literature review method was used to get evidence from the current knowledge linked to this theme. The results have evidenced a strong gap related to Industry 5.0 approaches for the supply chain field. Forty-one (41) publications, including conference and journal papers, have been found in the literature. Nineteen (19) words, which were grouped in four (4) clusters, have been identified in the data analysis. This was the basis to form the four (4) constructs of Industry 5.0: Industry Strategy, Innovation and Technologies, Society and Sustainability, and Transition Issues. Then, an alignment with the supply chain context was proposed, being the basis for the incipient Supply Chain 5.0 framework and its research agenda. Industry 5.0 is still in an embryonic and ideal stage. The literature is scarce and many other concepts and discoveries are going to emerge. Although this literature review is based on few available sources, it provides insightful and novel concepts related to Industry 5.0 in the supply chain context. Moreover, it presents a clear set of constructs and a structured research agenda to encourage researchers in deploying further conceptual and empirical works linked to the subject herein explored. Organizations’ leadership, policymakers, and other practitioners involved in supply chains, and mainly those currently working with Industry 4.0 initiatives, can benefit from this research by having clear guidance regarding the dimensions needed to structurally design and implement an Industry 5.0 strategy. This article adds valuable insights to researchers and practitioners, by approaching the newest and revolutionary concept of the Industry 5.0 phenomenon in the supply chain context, which is still an unexplored theme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain 4.0: New Generation of Supply Chain Management)
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