Conservative Management of Chronic Disease

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2024) | Viewed by 2010

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic conditions are representative of various health-related states of the human body, such as syndromes, physical impairments, disabilities as well as diseases. People of all age groups, regions and countries are affected by chronic disease. Conservative management is a type of medical treatment defined by the avoidance of invasive measures such as surgery, usually with the intent to preserve function. The aims of conservative management are as follows:

  1. Preventing the symptoms of disease;
  2. Treating the symptoms of disease;
  3. Protecting and maintaining functions.

This Special Issue ‘Conservative Management of Chronic Disease’ invites submissions from researchers on a wide spectrum of topics related to improving and enhancing chronic disease management.

Dr. Jonathan Sinclair
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic disease 
  • conservative management
  • trial protocol
  • clinical research
  • interventions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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14 pages, 1033 KiB  
Article
Effects of a Nutrition Education Programme in Stage IV Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients: A 3-Arm Randomised Controlled Trial
by Jonathan Sinclair, Stephanie Dillon, Nicola M. Lowe and April Melia
Life 2024, 14(1), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14010063 - 29 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1038
Abstract
This trial examined the influence of two nutrition intervention programmes on health-related and nutritional intake indices pertinent to cardiovascular disease compared to usual care in stage IV cardiac rehabilitation patients. Sixty-six patients were recruited from the Heartbeat North-West cardiac rehabilitation centre in Preston [...] Read more.
This trial examined the influence of two nutrition intervention programmes on health-related and nutritional intake indices pertinent to cardiovascular disease compared to usual care in stage IV cardiac rehabilitation patients. Sixty-six patients were recruited from the Heartbeat North-West cardiac rehabilitation centre in Preston (United Kingdom). Patients were randomly assigned to Usual care, Biggest loser or Nutrition education arms. Usual care undertook their usual two exercise classes per week without nutritional support, Biggest loser underwent weekly education sessions focussing on weight loss using the themes within the British Heart Foundation ‘So You Want to Lose Weight for Good’ guidelines, and Nutrition education followed the same themes as Biggest loser but in a more focussed manner informed by patient focus groups. In total, this was a 12-week trial in which patients spent 6 weeks engaged in their allocated intervention arm, after which all participants switched to Usual care. The primary outcome was systolic blood pressure, and secondary measures of anthropometric, blood biomarker, nutritional knowledge (via the Mediterranean Diet Assessment Tool) and nutritional intake indices were measured at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks (follow-up). Intention-to-treat analyses revealed no significant alterations in the primary outcome (Usual care: baseline = 130.45 mmHg, 6 weeks = 127.83 mmHg, and follow-up = 126.35 mmHg, Biggest loser: baseline = 133.50 mmHg, 6 weeks = 123.06 mmHg, and follow-up = 135.22 mmHg, or Nutrition education: baseline = 135.23 mmHg, 6 weeks = 129.20 mmHg, and follow-up = 126.26 mmHg) between arms. However, at 6 weeks, improvements in triglycerides were significantly greater in Usual care (baseline = 1.61 mmol/L and 6 weeks = 1.43 mmol/L) group compared to Nutrition education (baseline = 1.70 mmol/L and 6 weeks = 2.21 mmol/L). Improvements in nutrition knowledge were significantly greater in Nutrition education (baseline = 8.48, 6 weeks = 9.77, and follow-up = 10.07) compared to Usual care (baseline = 7.71, 6 weeks = 8.00, and follow-up = 8.00) and Biggest loser (baseline = 7.71, 6 weeks = 8.73, and follow-up = 8.36). At 6 weeks, the Biggest loser group (baseline = 4.75 g and 6 weeks = 3.83 g) exhibited significantly greater improvements in salt intake compared to Usual care (baseline = 4.87 g and 6 weeks = 4.28 g) and Nutrition education (baseline = 19.25 g and 6 weeks = 16.78 g) in saturated fatty acids compared to Usual care (baseline = 20.26 g and 6 weeks = 21.34 g). This trial shows the effectiveness of nutritional interventions for improving nutritional knowledge and dietary practices in stage IV cardiac rehabilitation, but the mechanisms and longer-term effects of increased triglyceride levels in the Nutrition education group requires further exploration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conservative Management of Chronic Disease)
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Protocol
Pilot Study of Home-Based Virtual Reality Fitness Training in Post-Discharge Rehabilitation for Patients with Spinal Cord Injury: A Randomized Double-Blind Multicenter Trial
by Dongheon Kang, Seon-Deok Eun and Jiyoung Park
Life 2024, 14(7), 859; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14070859 - 9 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients require continuous rehabilitation post-discharge to ensure optimal recovery. This study investigates the effectiveness of home-based virtual reality fitness training (VRFT) as a convenient and accessible rehabilitation method for SCI patients. This randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial will enroll 120 [...] Read more.
Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients require continuous rehabilitation post-discharge to ensure optimal recovery. This study investigates the effectiveness of home-based virtual reality fitness training (VRFT) as a convenient and accessible rehabilitation method for SCI patients. This randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial will enroll 120 participants, assigning them to either an 8-week VRFT program (exercise group) or a control group engaging in regular daily activities. The outcomes measured include muscle function, cardiopulmonary fitness, body composition, and physical performance. Our study will determine the safety and feasibility of VRFT in a home setting for SCI patients and evaluate whether these patients can effectively participate in such a program post-discharge. The results of this study are expected to inform future exercise protocols for SCI rehabilitation, offering valuable insights into the utility of VRFT as a therapeutic tool. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conservative Management of Chronic Disease)
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