Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 6th Fábos Conference on Landscape and Greenway Planning: Adapting to Expanding and Contracting Cities"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Professor Emeritus Richard C. Smardon
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Studies, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry , State University of New York, 416 Marshall Hall, 1 Forestry Drive, Syracuse, NYU 13210, USA
Interests: wetland assessment and management; landscape management policy; public participation and decision-making; sustainable development; eco-tourism; biosphere reserve management; energy sustainability planning and implementation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Fábos Conference on Landscape and Greenway Planning is held every three years to bring together experts who are influencing landscape planning, policy making, and greenway planning from the local to the international level. It is intended to highlight recent trends and expand the literature about landscape and greenway planning. The aim is to explore how landscape architects and planners from different countries have approached greenway planning and to understand how greenways have been tailored to each county’s unique geographical, cultural, and political circumstances.

The theme for the 2019 conference (https://sites.google.com/umass.edu/fabosconference2019, 28–30 March 2019, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA, USA) explores the social and ecological potential of linear green spaces in urban areas that are experiencing decline or those that are booming. We look to understand the variety of ways in which urban greenways are conceived, designed, built, used, and maintained in cities across the globe in response to economic and demographic trends. More specifically, the following topic areas are covered:

  • Cultural and/or historical landscapes;
  • Wildlife habitat;
  • Human health and well-being;
  • Recreation;
  • Urban waterfronts;
  • Expanding and contracting cities;
  • Equity and access;
  • Climate change and resilience;
  • Implementation and governance.

The conference provides an opportunity to publish full papers in printed proceedings (https://sites.google.com/umass.edu/fabosconference2019/publications). This Special Issue welcomes selected papers from the conference proceedings. Submitted contributions will be subject to peer review and—upon acceptance—will be published with the aim of rapidly and widely disseminating research results, developments, and applications.

It should be noted that submitted manuscripts should fulfil the following requirements: (1) The paper should be expanded to the size of a research article (at least 50% additional, new, and unpublished material compared to the published proceedings papers); (2) the conference paper should be cited and noted on the first page of the paper; (3) authors are asked to disclose that it is a conference paper in their cover letter and include a statement on what has been changed compared to the original conference paper. Land does not publish pilot studies or studies with inadequate statistical power.

In addition, papers that will be published in this e-conference-related Special Issue will receive a 20% discount on the APCs (Article Processing Charges).

Looking forward to receiving your contributions.

Professor Emeritus Richard C. Smardon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cultural and/or historical landscapes
  • Wildlife habitat
  • Human health and well-being
  • Recreation
  • Urban waterfronts
  • Expanding and contracting cities
  • Equity and access
  • Climate change and resilience
  • Implementation and governance

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Mapping and Analyzing the Park Cooling Effect on Urban Heat Island in an Expanding City: A Case Study in Zhengzhou City, China
Land 2020, 9(2), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9020057 - 14 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect has been extensively studied as a global issue. The urbanization process has been proved to be the main reason for this phenomenon. Over the past 20 years, the built-up area of Zhengzhou city has grown five times [...] Read more.
The Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect has been extensively studied as a global issue. The urbanization process has been proved to be the main reason for this phenomenon. Over the past 20 years, the built-up area of Zhengzhou city has grown five times larger, and the UHI effect has become increasingly pressing for the city’s inhabitants. Therefore, mitigating the UHI effect is an important research focus of the expanding capital city of the Henan province. In this study, the Landsat 8 image of July 2019 was selected from Landsat collection to obtain Land Surface Temperature (LST) by using Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) method, and present land cover information by using spectral indices. Additionally, high-resolution Google Earth images were used to select 123 parks, grouped in five categories, to explore the impact factors on park cooling effect. Park Cooling Intensity (PCI) has been chosen as an indicator of the park cooling effect which will quantify its relation to park patch metrics. The results show that: (1) Among the five studied park types, the theme park category has the largest cooling effect while the linear park category has the lowest cooling effect; (2) The mean park LST and PCI of the samples are positively correlated with the Fractional Vegetation Cover (FVC) and with Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), but these are negatively correlated with the Normalized Difference Impervious Surface Index (NDISI). We can suppose that the increase of vegetation cover rate within water areas as well as the decrease of impervious surface in landscape planning and design will make future parks colder. (3) There is a correlation between the PCI and the park characteristics. The UHI effect could be mitigated by increasing of park size and reducing park fractal dimension (Frac_Dim) and perimeter-area ratio (Patario). (4) The PCI is influenced by the park itself and its surrounding area. These results will provide an important reference for future urban planning and urban park design to mitigate the urban heat island effect. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Role of Vegetation in the Morphological Decoding of Lisbon (Portugal)
Land 2020, 9(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9010018 - 11 Jan 2020
Abstract
In the academic context, especially in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, and urbanism, urban form studies are assumed to be a vehicle for reflection on the built and unbuilt city. This essay aims to challenge the most common and stabilized morphological approaches [...] Read more.
In the academic context, especially in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, and urbanism, urban form studies are assumed to be a vehicle for reflection on the built and unbuilt city. This essay aims to challenge the most common and stabilized morphological approaches in the city reading process, invoking vegetation and its role as an element of urban composition that is recurrently left out of it. Methodologically, this work uses the city of Lisbon to carry out a morphological characterization of different homogeneous areas based on a decomposition process of urban systems and elements. The article focuses on the reading of the public component of three homogeneous areas in Lisbon—Alfama, Avenidas and Alvalade—and specifically on the role of urban greenery as a systemic element of the formal or informal composition of the city. Through an initial systematization process reflects upon the formal attributes of vegetation and trees in particular, this research may contribute not only to the development of the discipline of urban morphology applied to the city of Lisbon but also to the acknowledgment of urban greenery as a contributor to the creation of specific, unique, and unrepeatable spaces within urban landscapes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Amman (City of Waters); Policy, Land Use, and Character Changes
Land 2019, 8(12), 195; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8120195 - 15 Dec 2019
Abstract
The character of Amman, Jordan, as the "City of Waters"—referring to the abundance of water flowing in its known stream—has faded away because of the municipal policy to cover the stream in the 1960s which gradually changed the ecological character. This paper [...] Read more.
The character of Amman, Jordan, as the "City of Waters"—referring to the abundance of water flowing in its known stream—has faded away because of the municipal policy to cover the stream in the 1960s which gradually changed the ecological character. This paper traces and explores the impacts of stream-coverage policy on the city character, morphology and land use changes. The purpose is to understand how an engineered problem-solving policy changed physical and perceptive factors and affected the character of the city. It also explores future attitudes towards reversing the non-nature-friendly conditions. The methods depend upon monitoring morphological changes in aerial photographs and in land use maps from municipality archives, conducting interviews with the elderly who witnessed change, one-to-one questionnaires with stakeholders and online questionnaires with residents and visitors. The results show that covering the stream is depriving the city of its historical/ecological character. The policy failed to promote affluent business, to mitigate flood impacts, or to decrease traffic congestion in the Central Business District (CBD). Most age groups believe the stream can improve the image and economy, despite the fact of their unawareness of its historical presence. In conclusion, engineered problem-solving should not stay in the hands of decision makers (technocrats) alone, but rather be considered with the public, sustainable character experts, and ecologists. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Research-Based Design Approaches in Historic Garden Renovation
Land 2019, 8(12), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8120192 - 12 Dec 2019
Abstract
The renewal of historic gardens, landscapes, and sites has grown to be a current issue in Central and Eastern Europe. Based on scientific research, the Department of Garden Art of the Szent István University, Faculty of Landscape Architecture and Urbanism has been dealing [...] Read more.
The renewal of historic gardens, landscapes, and sites has grown to be a current issue in Central and Eastern Europe. Based on scientific research, the Department of Garden Art of the Szent István University, Faculty of Landscape Architecture and Urbanism has been dealing with landscape renewal since 1963 on regional, settlement, and garden scales, too. More than 50 years of experience has already proved the advantage of such a research-based design approach in garden and landscape renewal processes, Landscape Architecture has developed from a very practical basis. The purpose of this paper is to show the most significant conclusions of our historic garden research of castle gardens from the Carpathian Basin, focusing on the importance of visual connections designed initially on the sites. Using case studies, the paper intends to explore how proper landscape design in historic environments is achieved. The historical value cannot be simplified or understood as the notion of “old”, the heritage being represented by the all-time valuable garden features and elements, independent from their formation in time. In addition to the historical authenticity of the actual use, the social needs and sustainability are important aspects, which must be integrated into heritage protection and reclamation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Use of Community Greenways: A Case Study on A Linear Greenway Space in High Dense Residential Areas, Guangzhou
Land 2019, 8(12), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8120188 - 08 Dec 2019
Abstract
The community greenway is a kind of greenway that goes through high-density residential areas in the city and is closely related to residents’ life. However, few scholars focus on how this type of greenways serves the everyday life of the community as an [...] Read more.
The community greenway is a kind of greenway that goes through high-density residential areas in the city and is closely related to residents’ life. However, few scholars focus on how this type of greenways serves the everyday life of the community as an integrated resource. This aspect is important because the everyday life in the public space involves multiple activities. How to coordinate and satisfy these activities relates to the benefits of community greenways. Therefore, this paper takes a representative community greenway in Haizhu District of Guangzhou as an example, to study whether community greenways match the needs of necessary activities, optional activities and social activities. The usage patterns, the evaluation of the current status, the impact on everyday activities, and the importance of different construction factors were surveyed. The applied methods include site observation, questionnaires and interviews. The results show that more than 90% of users are from communities within 1 mile from the community greenway. More than half of the users (55%) are satisfied with the community greenways. Furthermore, the community greenways benefit the everyday activities of residents, such as transportation, recreation, social interaction and also other minor but important everyday activities. However, from the perspective of residents’ requirements for construction factors, the status of service facilities needs to be improved. The characteristics, overall benefits, and construction implications of community greenways are therefore discussed. Community greenways can be important open space for residents and this paper is significant on community greenways meeting the needs of residents’ everyday activities, thus, to provide a better community living environment and to build a better urban open space system. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Urban Greenways: A Systematic Review and Typology
Land 2020, 9(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9020040 - 01 Feb 2020
Abstract
Greenways are multifunctional linear landscapes that provide a range of socio-ecological benefits. As a domain of landscape planning research, greenways gained traction in the late 20th century and today, there is substantial interest in greenway planning and design. This is especially true in [...] Read more.
Greenways are multifunctional linear landscapes that provide a range of socio-ecological benefits. As a domain of landscape planning research, greenways gained traction in the late 20th century and today, there is substantial interest in greenway planning and design. This is especially true in urban areas, as noted at the sixth Fábos Conference on Landscape and Greenway Planning. Yet, cities encompass biophysical flows, sociopolitical relationships, and formal structures that are distinct from non-urban areas and urban greenways may reflect an evolving type of landscape planning and design that is related to but distinct from greenways writ large. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no previous review of scholarship on greenways in an urban context. We address the aforementioned gaps by reporting on a systematic assessment of peer-reviewed literature. The review encompasses 52 refereed articles using the term “urban greenway” or “urban greenways” in the title, abstract, or keywords drawn from three prominent academic databases. Our analysis covers seven research categories, and this undergirds a typology and definition of urban greenways. In so doing, we seek to illuminate typical traits of urban greenways to inform future landscape planning scholarship and practice. Full article
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