Special Issue "Nature-based solutions (NBS) in Cities and Their Interaction with Urban Land, Ecosystems, Built Environment and People: Debating Societal Implications"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dagmar Haase

Lab of Landscape Ecology, Department of Geography, Humboldt University Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 16, 12489 Berlin, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0049 341 235 1950
Interests: urban ecology; land use modelling; ecosystem services
Guest Editor
Dr. Annegret Haase

Department of Environmental and Urban Sociology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: urban sociology; sustainable urban development; (re)growth and shrinkage
Guest Editor
Dr. Manuel Wolff

Lab of Landscape Ecology, Department of Geography, Humboldt University Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 16, 12489 Berlin, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainable urbanization; Green Infrastructure; Shrinkage; Regrowth; European Spatial Development
Guest Editor
Dr. Diana Dushkova

Lab of Landscape Ecology, Department of Geography, Humboldt University Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 16, 12489 Berlin, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: urban ecosystem services; Nature-Based Solutions; Russian cities; Health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nature-based solutions are a comparatively new field of research regarding the ‘green city’ and a main focus of large European and Global research programs. Nature-based Solutions (NBS) are defined by IUCN as “actions to protect, sustainably manage, and restore natural or modified—in our case urban—ecosystems that address societal challenges effectively and adaptively, simultaneously providing human well-being and biodiversity benefits”. NBS have the aim to support the achievement of society’s development goals and human well-being and public health as well as social welfare in ways that reflect the cultural and societal values of the urban societies and enhance the resilience of ecosystems, their capacity for renewal, their diversity, along with the provision of services. NBS are designed to address major societal challenges related to cities, such as safe and clean housing, fresh air, food security, climate change, water supply, human health, and disaster risk. NBS are intended to produce societal benefits in a fair and equitable way, thus promoting transparency and broad participation as well as learning and education.

This Special Issue seeks to provide a state of the art of the functional, empirical, and field study-based experiences and data on NBS provided by green and blue infrastructure (GBI) in cities. We focus on the interaction of the instrument of NBS, its benefits, and tradeoffs with urban land, the built environment in cities, and the urban society, in particular in relation to social wealth and public health, also taking into account stewardship and governance aspects.

We aim at answering questions such as:

  • What type of GBI-based NBS are being implemented in cities across the Globe?
  • Which properties of urban nature and/or urban ecosystems do they make use of, and how do NBS themselves influence urban ecosystems and ecosystem services flows in Cities?
  • What are the trade-offs of NBS with other ecosystem services and urban biodiversity?
  • What are the typical land units and types where NBS are implemented?
  • How do NBS and their implementation interrogate/interact with the social environment and issues of social cohesion and justice?
  • What are land governance and policy schemes for NBS in cities? Do they differ from the prevailing land management and governance policies implemented so far in our cities?
  • How does the implementation of NBS correspond/interact with general directions and priorities of urban development?
  • More specific topics or questions could be added here.

Prof. Dagmar Haase
Dr. Annegret Haase
Dr. Manuel Wolff
Dr. Diana Dushkova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 750 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nature-Based Solutions
  • cities
  • benefits
  • trade-offs
  • urban land
  • ecosystems
  • built environment
  • urban society

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Predicting Land Use Changes in Philadelphia Following Green Infrastructure Policies
Received: 20 December 2018 / Revised: 28 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5625 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Urbanization is a rapid global trend, leading to consequences such as urban heat islands and local flooding. Imminent climate change is predicted to intensify these consequences, forcing cities to rethink common infrastructure practices. One popular method of adaptation is green infrastructure implementation, which [...] Read more.
Urbanization is a rapid global trend, leading to consequences such as urban heat islands and local flooding. Imminent climate change is predicted to intensify these consequences, forcing cities to rethink common infrastructure practices. One popular method of adaptation is green infrastructure implementation, which has been found to reduce local temperatures and alleviate excess runoff when installed effectively. As cities continue to change and adapt, land use/landcover modeling becomes an important tool for city officials in planning future land usage. This study uses a combination of cellular automata, machine learning, and Markov chain analysis to predict high resolution land use/landcover changes in Philadelphia, PA, USA for the year 2036. The 2036 landcover model assumes full implementation of Philadelphia’s green infrastructure program and past temporal trends of urbanization. The methodology used to create the 2036 model was validated by creating an intermediate prediction of a 2015 landcover that was then compared to an existing 2015 landcover. The accuracy of the validation was determined using Kappa statistics and disagreement scores. The 2036 model successfully met Philadelphia’s green infrastructure goals. A variety of landscape metrics demonstrated an overall decrease in fragmentation throughout the landscape due to increases in urban landcover. Full article
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