Special Issue "Personalized Care and Treatment Compliance in Chronic Conditions"

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Methodology, Drug and Device Discovery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fábio G. Teixeira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Medicine, University of Minho, 4710-057, Braga, Portugal. ICVS/3B's Associate Lab, PT Government Associated Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: regenerative medicine; mesenchymal stem cells; stem cells secretome; bioreactor cell culture; exosomes; astrocyte reactivity; neuron-glia communication; 3D culture systems; Parkinson's disease
Dr. Catarina Godinho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Clinical Research Unit (CRU), Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz (CiiEM), Instituto Universitário Egas Moniz, 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal
Interests: Parkinson's disease; clinical exercise; rehabilitation; nutrition; the elderly and aging and motor function assessment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Júlio Belo Fernandes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, Escola Superior de Saúde Egas Moniz/ PaMNEC - CiiEM, Al-mada, Rua António José Batista nº116, 3esq. 2910-397 Setúbal, Portugal.
Interests: nursing education; nursing; advanced practice nursing; nursing leadership; nursing management; nursing theory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Background: Chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases are growing at an alarming rate, especially in the aging population. People who have chronic disease spend a significant amount of time in self-management in out-of-hospital environments, in their homes and in their community settings. These patients have different disease statuses and management requirements, so providing personalized care is key.

Aim and scope: We aim to publish articles describing a personalized care approach to the diagnosis and treatment to chronically ill patients.

History: Personalised care is a collaborative process that should be used in chronic condition management in which patients, caregivers and healthcare providers identify and discuss problems caused by or related to the patient's condition, and then develop plans and goals to empower patients. 

Cutting-edge research: Personalized care can improve aspects of physical health, mental health and the ability to self-manage conditions. Thus, a personalized care approach could greatly benefit patients with chronic conditions.

What kind of papers we are soliciting: We encourage the submission of manuscripts that describe a personalized care approach to the diagnosis and treatment to chronically ill patients.

Dr. Fábio G. Teixeira
Dr. Catarina Godinho
Prof. Dr. Júlio Belo Fernandes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • personalized care
  • person-centredness
  • patient compliance
  • patient participation
  • empowerment
  • chronic conditions
  • chronic disease

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
A Novel Boot Camp Program to Help Guide Personalized Exercise in People with Parkinson Disease
J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11(9), 938; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11090938 (registering DOI) - 20 Sep 2021
Abstract
Given the variety of exercise programs available for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), such individuals may struggle to make decisions about what exercise to perform. The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness, satisfaction, and preferences regarding participation in a PD-personalized [...] Read more.
Given the variety of exercise programs available for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), such individuals may struggle to make decisions about what exercise to perform. The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness, satisfaction, and preferences regarding participation in a PD-personalized educational and exercise boot camp program. Attendees participated in a four-day program consisting of exercise sessions, workshops, and social activities. We collected demographic and clinical information. We assessed satisfaction and preferences immediately after. At one-month follow-up, participants assessed usefulness and changes in exercise habits. Eight individuals diagnosed with PD, with a mean age of 59.5 ± 6.8 years, participated. All participants felt “very satisfied” and likely to attend future events. The two favorite sessions were: cognitive stepping and dance-based movements. At one-month follow-up, participants considered the program “very useful” and reported changes in their exercise routine. Our results suggest that the boot camp program was considered useful and capable of influencing participants’ exercise habits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Care and Treatment Compliance in Chronic Conditions)
Article
The Effects of Different Types of Dual Tasking on Balance in Healthy Older Adults
J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11(9), 933; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11090933 (registering DOI) - 18 Sep 2021
Viewed by 377
Abstract
Numerous of our daily activities are performed within multitask or dual task conditions. These conditions involve the interaction of perceptual and motor processes involved in postural control. Age-related changes may negatively impact cognition and balance control. Studies identifying changes related to dual-task actions [...] Read more.
Numerous of our daily activities are performed within multitask or dual task conditions. These conditions involve the interaction of perceptual and motor processes involved in postural control. Age-related changes may negatively impact cognition and balance control. Studies identifying changes related to dual-task actions in older people are need. This study aimed to determine the effects of different types of dual-tasking on the balance control of healthy older adults. The sample included 36 community-living older adults, performing two tests—a sway test and a timed up-and-go test—in three conditions: (a) single motor task; (b) dual motor task; and (c) dual motor task with cognitive demands. Cognitive processes (dual-task and cognition) affected static balance, increasing amplitude (p < 0.001) and frequency (p < 0.001) of the center of mass displacements. Dynamic balance revealed significant differences between the single motor condition and the other two conditions during gait phases (p < 0.001). The effect of dual-tasking in older adults suggests that cognitive processes are a main cause of increased variability in balance and gait when under an automatic control. During sit-to-stand, turning, and turn-to-sit movements under dual-tasking, the perceptive information becomes the most important focus of attention, while any cognitive task becomes secondary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Care and Treatment Compliance in Chronic Conditions)
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Article
The Role of Pain Catastrophizing and Pain Acceptance in Performance-Based and Self-Reported Physical Functioning in Individuals with Fibromyalgia and Obesity
J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11(8), 810; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11080810 - 19 Aug 2021
Viewed by 383
Abstract
Impaired physical functioning is one of the most critical consequences associated with fibromyalgia, especially when there is comorbid obesity. Psychological factors are known to contribute to perceived (i.e., subjective) physical functioning. However, physical function is a multidimensional concept encompassing both subjective and objective [...] Read more.
Impaired physical functioning is one of the most critical consequences associated with fibromyalgia, especially when there is comorbid obesity. Psychological factors are known to contribute to perceived (i.e., subjective) physical functioning. However, physical function is a multidimensional concept encompassing both subjective and objective functioning. The contribution of psychological factors to performance-based (i.e., objective) functioning is unclear. This study aims to investigate the contribution of pain catastrophizing and pain acceptance to both self-reported and performance-based physical functioning. In this cross-sectional study, 160 participants completed self-report measures of pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and pain severity. A self-report measure and a performance-based test were used to assess physical functioning. Higher pain catastrophizing and lower pain acceptance were associated with poorer physical functioning at both self-reported and performance-based levels. Our results are consistent with previous evidence on the association between pain catastrophizing and pain acceptance with self-reported physical functioning. This study contributes to the current literature by providing novel insights into the role of psychological factors in performance-based physical functioning. Multidisciplinary interventions that address pain catastrophizing and pain acceptance are recommended and might be effective to improve both perceived and performance-based functioning in women with FM and obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Care and Treatment Compliance in Chronic Conditions)
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