ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Minimizing the Burden of Aging Disorders

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Economics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2022) | Viewed by 19457

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail
Guest Editor
Medical Pathology, Nutrition and Clinical Exercise Group (PaMNEC), Multidisciplinary Research Center of Egas Moniz (CiiEM), 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal
Interests: neurological diseases; Parkinson's disease; elderly and aging; clinical exercise; non-pharmacologic interventions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Grupo de Patologia Médica, Nutrição e Exercício Clínico (PaMNEC), Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz (CiiEM), Instituto Universitário Egas Moniz, 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal
Interests: clinical nutrition; enteral and parenteral nutrition; digestive disorders; microbiota; systemic impact of digestive disorders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world is facing a situation without precedent: we will soon have more older people than children and more people at extreme old age than ever before (WHO, Global Health and Aging, 2011). In the last 100 years, populations in developed countries have experienced an unprecedented addition of 30 years to their life expectancy. Developing countries are now experiencing this same phenomenon. With this comes the challenge of maximizing health and vitality across these aging populations. The compression of morbidity to the latest point in the human life span could unleash a sustained third demographic dividend that benefits all of society (Fried LP, 2016). To accomplish this, society needs to invest in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases, frailty and all the burdens associated with aging such as falls prevention and cognitive impairment. Papers addressing these topics are invited to this Special Issue, especially those combining a high academic standard coupled with a practical focus on providing input strategies to minimizing the burden of aging.

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the current state of knowledge on how society in general and health professionals in particular can contribute to minimizing the burden of aging disorders. New research papers, reviews, case reports and case series are welcome to this issue. Other manuscript types accepted include methodological papers, position papers and brief reports.

We will accept manuscripts from different disciplines including exposure assessment science, epidemiology, clinical studies, risk and health impact assessment and risk management.

Dr. Catarina Godinho
Prof. Dr. Jorge Fonseca
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aging
  • aging disorders
  • active aging
  • elderly
  • neurodegenerative disorders
  • elderly nutrition
  • falls prevention
  • frailty and elderly
  • cognitive impairment

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 376 KiB  
Article
Oral Health Status of Adult Dysphagic Patients That Undergo Endoscopic Gastrostomy for Long Term Enteral Feeding
by Sara Lopes, Vitor Tavares, Paulo Mascarenhas, Marta Lopes, Carolina Cardote, Catarina Godinho, Cátia Oliveira, Carla Adriana Santos, Madalena Oom, José Grillo-Evangelista and Jorge Fonseca
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(8), 4827; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084827 - 15 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2658
Abstract
Background: Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG) is required to maintain a feeding route when neurological or cancer dysphagia impact oral intake. This study aimed to evaluate the oral health and oral changes of PEG-patients without oral feeding for three months. Methods: Prospective observational study, with [...] Read more.
Background: Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG) is required to maintain a feeding route when neurological or cancer dysphagia impact oral intake. This study aimed to evaluate the oral health and oral changes of PEG-patients without oral feeding for three months. Methods: Prospective observational study, with a PEG-patients convenience sample. Data were obtained before PEG (T0) and 3 months after gastrostomy (T1). Initial oral hygiene habits were collected through a questionnaire. Intra-oral evaluation was performed using: Plaque Index (IP), Gingival Index (IG), Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth Index (DMF), Community Periodontal Index (CPI), and Attachment Loss (AL). T0 and T1 were compared to evaluate oral health evolution. Results: Thirty-nine patients aged 65.3 ± 17.4 years were included. Initial (T0) oral health was worse than expectable. Between assessments period, oral indexes suffered a general deterioration with statistical relevance to the DMF. The frequency of deep periodontal pockets and attachment loss remained stable. Conclusions: PEG-patients presented poor oral health and insufficient oral hygiene habits, even before gastrostomy. After three months of PEG feeding, oral health suffered a general deterioration. This outcome was probably associated with the absence of oral feeding activity, which is beneficial to oral homeostasis, and further reduced oral hygiene. Improved oral daily care and dental appointments should become part of the PEG-patients follow-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minimizing the Burden of Aging Disorders)
10 pages, 748 KiB  
Article
The Association of Nutrition Quality with Frailty Syndrome among the Elderly
by Katarzyna Rolf, Aurelia Santoro, Morena Martucci and Barbara Pietruszka
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3379; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063379 - 13 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2773
Abstract
Low diet quality among the elderly may be correlated with some diseases, including Frailty Syndrome (FS). This decline in function restricts the activity of older people, resulting in higher assistance costs. The aim of this study was to increase knowledge of diet quality [...] Read more.
Low diet quality among the elderly may be correlated with some diseases, including Frailty Syndrome (FS). This decline in function restricts the activity of older people, resulting in higher assistance costs. The aim of this study was to increase knowledge of diet quality predictors. Dietary intake was assessed among 196 individuals aged 60+ years using the three-day record method and FS by Fried’s criteria. Based on the compliance with the intake recommendation (% of EAR/AI), we distinguished three clusters that were homogeneous in terms of the nutritional quality of the diet, using Kohonen’s neural networks. The prevalence of frailty in the entire group was 3.1%, pre-frailty 38.8%, and non-frailty 58.1%. Cluster 1 (91 people with the lowest diet quality) was composed of a statistically significant higher number of the elderly attending day care centers (20.7%), frail (6.9%), pre-frail (51.7%), very low vitamin D intake (23.8% of AI), using sun cream during the summer months (always 19.8% or often 39.6%), having diabetes (20.7%), having leg pain when walking (43.1%), and deteriorating health during the last year (53.5%). The study suggests the need to take initiatives leading to the improvement of the diet of the elderly, especially in day care senior centers, where there are more frail individuals, including nutritional education for the elderly and their caregivers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minimizing the Burden of Aging Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 340 KiB  
Article
Rehabilitation Workforce Challenges to Implement Person-Centered Care
by Júlio Belo Fernandes, Diana Vareta, Sónia Fernandes, Ana Silva Almeida, Dina Peças, Noélia Ferreira and Liliana Roldão
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3199; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063199 - 8 Mar 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2780
Abstract
There is an increasing emphasis on developing person-centered care in rehabilitation settings. However, this care practice has not been fully implemented due to several factors. This study explores rehabilitation workforce perspectives on the barriers and facilitators to implementing person-centered care (PCC). This was [...] Read more.
There is an increasing emphasis on developing person-centered care in rehabilitation settings. However, this care practice has not been fully implemented due to several factors. This study explores rehabilitation workforce perspectives on the barriers and facilitators to implementing person-centered care (PCC). This was a quantitative descriptive study, which was developed based on interviews with 12 healthcare professionals from a private institution in the region of Lisbon and Tagus Valley in Portugal. The recruitment was made in October 2020. Braun, Clarke, Hayfield, and Terry’s content analysis was applied to the transcripts, and these were transcribed verbatim. The consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ) checklist were applied to this study. Participants described barriers such as an unsupportive organization and leadership, staff constraints, heavy workload, and resistance to change. Unique to this study, a patient’s clinical characteristics were identified as barriers to person-centered care. As facilitators, they described leadership, staff satisfaction, a positive physical environment, training and education, and shared decision-making. It is essential to understand the perceptions of the rehabilitation workforce, as they play an integral role in providing PCC. This study serves as a guide to facilitate person-centered care, as it provides an understanding of key barriers and facilitators for its implementation in rehabilitation settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minimizing the Burden of Aging Disorders)
15 pages, 884 KiB  
Article
Associations between Long-Term Air Pollution Exposure and Risk of Osteoporosis-Related Fracture in a Nationwide Cohort Study in South Korea
by Seulkee Heo, Honghyok Kim, Sera Kim, Seung-Ah Choe, Garam Byun, Jong-Tae Lee and Michelle L. Bell
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(4), 2404; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042404 - 19 Feb 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3058
Abstract
Bone health is a major concern for aging populations globally. Osteoporosis and bone mineral density are associated with air pollution, but less is known about the impacts of air pollution on osteoporotic fracture. We aimed to assess the associations between long-term air pollution [...] Read more.
Bone health is a major concern for aging populations globally. Osteoporosis and bone mineral density are associated with air pollution, but less is known about the impacts of air pollution on osteoporotic fracture. We aimed to assess the associations between long-term air pollution exposure and risk of osteoporotic fracture in seven large Korean cities. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate hazard rations (HRs) of time-varying moving window of past exposures of particulate matter (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) for osteoporotic fracture in Korean adults (age ≥ 50 years) in the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort data, followed 2002 to 2015. HRs were calculated for an interquartile range (IQR) increase. Comorbidity and prescription associated with osteoporosis, age, sex, body mass index, health behaviors, and income were adjusted in the models. Effect modification by age, sex, exercise, and income was examined. We assessed 56,467 participants over 535,481 person-years of follow up. Linear and positive exposure-response associations were found for SO2, while PM10 and NO2 showed nonlinear associations. SO2 was associated with osteoporosis-related fracture with marginal significance (HR for an IQR [2 ppb] increase = 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.09). The SO2 HR estimates were robust in analyses applying various moving windows of exposure (from one to three years of past exposure) and two-pollutant models. The central HR estimate of O3 implied positive associations but was not significant (HR for 0.007 ppm increase = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.97, 1.06). PM10, CO, and NO2 did not show associations. Vulnerable groups by sex, age, exercise, and income varied across air pollutants and there was no evidence of effect modifications. Long-term exposure to SO2, but not PM10, CO, NO2 and O3, was associated with increased osteoporotic fracture risks in Korean adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minimizing the Burden of Aging Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 3187 KiB  
Article
Is Being Physically Active Enough or Do People with Parkinson’s Disease Need Structured Supervised Exercise? Lessons Learned from COVID-19
by Josefa Domingos, Carlos Família, Júlio Belo Fernandes, John Dean and Catarina Godinho
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(4), 2396; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042396 - 19 Feb 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2326
Abstract
Social isolation imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted people’s lifestyles and daily activities. In this work we compared pre- and post-pandemic clinical outcomes in people with Parkinson’s disease, to assess differences according to the type of behaviour and exercise habits adopted by [...] Read more.
Social isolation imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted people’s lifestyles and daily activities. In this work we compared pre- and post-pandemic clinical outcomes in people with Parkinson’s disease, to assess differences according to the type of behaviour and exercise habits adopted by participants. After two months of COVID-19 lockdown, we assessed: changes in exercise behaviour; motor and non-motor aspects of daily life experiences (MDS-UPDRS I & II); activities of daily living (The Schwab & England scale); quality of life (Parkinson Disease Questionnaire); sleep (Parkinson Disease Sleep Scale); falls; and Clinical Global Impression Change. Twenty-seven individuals aged between 57 and 92 years old participated; from these, ten individuals (37%) completely interrupted physical activities, while seventeen (63%) maintained some level of active lifestyle. Regardless of whether they remained active or not, all participants perceived a significant worsening of their clinical condition, reporting an increase in difficulties completing daily activities or chores (37%) and worsening of their health condition (51.8%). The quantifiable influence of exercise habits was borderline for the group who kept active. The active group seem to have a better self-perception of their health condition, although it was not enough to show a clear benefit. People with Parkinson’s disease should be informed that being physically active may not be enough and more structured exercise could be needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minimizing the Burden of Aging Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 357 KiB  
Article
Professionals’ Self-Reported Difficulties towards Integrating Dual Task Training in Care for People with Parkinson’s Disease
by Josefa Domingos, John Dean, Júlio Belo Fernandes and Catarina Godinho
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1281; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031281 - 24 Jan 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2507
Abstract
Background: Despite the growing use of dual task training (DTT) in clinical practice with people with Parkinson Disease (PD), there is still limited evidence on how to best implement it. Data regarding professionals’ difficulties when integrating such practices are critical as a first [...] Read more.
Background: Despite the growing use of dual task training (DTT) in clinical practice with people with Parkinson Disease (PD), there is still limited evidence on how to best implement it. Data regarding professionals’ difficulties when integrating such practices are critical as a first step to generate further guidance on how to apply it. The aim of this study was to identify the difficulties perceived by professionals to integrate dual task in their practice. Methods: A descriptive, observational and cross-sectional study was conducted using a web-based survey. Convenience sampling was used to recruit exercise and healthcare professionals working with people with PD through various social media channels. Data were collected and then analyzed thematically using the method of constant comparisons. The study report follows the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ) checklist. Results: Of the 205 eligible responses, 68.8% were Physiotherapist. The majority of the participants reported having Parkinson-specific training (91.7%) and 59.0% applied DTT in individual one-on-one sessions. We identified ten categories of difficulties faced by professionals. Conclusions: Professionals struggle to integrate DTT into PD clinical care. Challenges were identified and the most significant refer to difficulties in managing the chronicity of the disease and lack of patient compliance with home exercises. Understanding current challenges towards dual task exercise will help to reflect upon strategies to be applied effectively and safe. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minimizing the Burden of Aging Disorders)
12 pages, 7911 KiB  
Article
Optimal Assessment of Nutritional Status in Older Subjects with the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease—A Comparison of Three Screening Tools Used in the GLIM Diagnostic Algorithm
by Aleksandra Kaluźniak-Szymanowska, Roma Krzymińska-Siemaszko, Katarzyna Wieczorowska-Tobis and Ewa Deskur-Śmielecka
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1025; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031025 - 18 Jan 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2397
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a recognized risk factor for malnutrition. The European Respiratory Society (ERS) statement included nutritional status assessment and dietary intervention as essential components of comprehensive management in subjects with COPD. According to the GLIM algorithm, the first step [...] Read more.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a recognized risk factor for malnutrition. The European Respiratory Society (ERS) statement included nutritional status assessment and dietary intervention as essential components of comprehensive management in subjects with COPD. According to the GLIM algorithm, the first step in diagnosing malnutrition is risk screening with a validated tool. Our study aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of three screening tools (MNA-SF, MUST, and NRS-2002) used in the GLIM algorithm in older patients with COPD. Additionally, we evaluated the agreement between these tools in the diagnostics of malnutrition. We performed a cross-sectional study of 124 patients aged at least 60 years with COPD diagnosed, based on the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). We assessed the participants’ nutritional status with the three examined screening questionnaires (MNA-SF, MUST, and NRS-2002). Regardless of their results, we performed full malnutrition diagnostics following the GLIM algorithm in all subjects. The proportion of malnourished participants varied from 18.5% for the MUST questionnaire to 27.4% for the MNA-SF and 57.3% for the NRS-2002 score. Based on the GLIM criteria, malnutrition was diagnosed in 48 subjects (38.7%). All assessed questionnaires had an unsatisfactory sensitivity against the GLIM criteria for malnutrition: it was fair (58.3%) for the MNA-SF tool and poor for the MUST and NRS-2002 questionnaires (47.9% for both questionnaires). Considering the negative health consequences of malnutrition, a full diagnostic including GLIM etiologic and phenotypic criteria should be recommended in all elderly patients with COPD, regardless of the screening results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minimizing the Burden of Aging Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop