New Roles of Journalism and Disruptive Media: A Challenging Future

A special issue of Journalism and Media (ISSN 2673-5172).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 2648

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Journalism, Blanquerna School of Communication and International Relations, Ramon Llull University, 08001 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: political communication; journalism; rhetoric; social media; American politics

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor Assistant
Department of Journalism, Blanquerna School of Communication and International Relations, Ramon Llull University, 08001 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: journalism; social media; audience; analytics; business model

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To fulfill their social mission (i.e., informing) journalists have always needed media. Their activity is an essentially mediating one, even if (or especially when) new genres and environments hybridize information and entertainment, exploiting the opportunities provided by new technologies and digitalization.

Journalism has been changing throughout history, adapting to societal transformations. In today's globalized world, with the explosion of social networks and the emergence of new tools, the profession is (as it has always been) in constant evolution. Changes in technological, industrial, and social environments, such as artificial intelligence, metaverses, augmented reality, new business models, new communication platforms, increasingly affordable digital tools, the opportunities of web analytics and social networks, the need to deal with fake news, fact-checking, visualization, machine learning, and data journalism, also transform journalism. These phenomena pose new challenges that require adaptation and training to be confronted, without renouncing the watchdog role of a profession that was once called the Fourth Estate.

This Special Issue aims to debate, from different perspectives, how to face these demands and propose answers to these new challenges. Its content is linked to the XXIX conference of the Spanish Society of Journalism (SEP) that will take place in Barcelona on June 29 and 30, 2023.

The call for papers covers different areas, according to the thematic lines proposed by the organizers of the aforementioned congress. Authors are therefore invited to cover these subjects from various perspectives:

  • New profiles and roles of journalism professionals.
  • Business models of the new journalistic enterprise.
  • Needs for the training of journalists.
  • Journalists 4.0: from digital journalism to the metaverse.
  • Artificial intelligence and journalism: the challenge of automation.
  • Journalists facing disinformation and fake news.
  • Personal branding and journalists: reporters or influencers.
  • Brand journalists: from press offices to branded content.

Dr. Pere Franch
Guest Editor

Valentina Laferrara
Guest Editor Assistant

References

Fisher, C., Park, S., & Lee, J. Y. (2021). Who writes a press release? Changing audience perceptions of journalists as marketers of news, not just reporters. Journalism, 22(8), 1964–1982. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884919847803.

García-Galera, M. C., Martínez-Nicolás, M., & Del-Hoyo-Hurtado, M. (2021). Innovation in university journalism education programs. A systematic review of educational experiences in Spanish universities. Profesional de la información, 30(3). https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2021.may.07.

Hermida, A., & Mellado, C. (2020). Dimensions of Social Media Logics: Mapping Forms of Journalistic Norms and Practices on Twitter and Instagram. Digital Journalism, 8(7), 864–884. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2020.1805779.

Jahng, M. R., Eckert, S. & Metzger-Riftkin, J. (2021). Defending the Profession: U.S. Journalists' Role Understanding in the Era of Fake News. Journalism Practice. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2021.1919177.

Jones, S. (2017). Disrupting the narrative: immersive journalism in virtual reality. Journal of Media Practice, 18(2–3), 171–185. https://doi.org/10.1080/14682753.2017.1374677.

Mellado, C. (2022). Roles and digital identities on Twitter and Instagram: An ethnographic study of Chilean journalists. Profesional De La información, 31(4). https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2022.jul.14.

Negreira-Rey, M., Vázquez-Herrero, J., & López-García, X. (2022). Blurring boundaries between journalists and tiktokers: Journalistic role performance in TikTok. Media and Communication, 10(1), 146–156. https://doi.org/10.17645/mac.v10i1.4699.

Nelson, J. L. (2019). The next media regime: The pursuit of ‘audience engagement’ in journalism. Journalism, 22(9), 2350–2367. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884919862375.

Newman, N. (2023). Journalism, Media, and Technology Trends and Predictions 2023. Oxford: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.

Olausson, U. (2018). The celebrity journalist. Journalism Studies, 19(16), 2379–2399. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2017.1349548.

Olausson, U. (2017). The reinvented journalist. The discursive construction of professional identity on Twitter. Digital Journalism, 5(1), 61–81. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2016.1146082.

Palomo, B., & Palau-Sampio, D. (2016). The adaptive journalist. Innovation consultants and directors analyze the qualities of the communication professional. Profesional de la información, 25(2), 188–195. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2016.mar.05.

Ross Arguedas, A. A., Badrinathan, S., Mont’Alverne, C., Toff, B., Fletcher, R., & Nielsen, R. K. (2022). “It’s a Battle You Are Never Going to Win”: Perspectives from Journalists in Four Countries on How Digital Media Platforms Undermine Trust in News. Journalism Studies. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2022.2112908.

Saldaña, M. & Vu, H. T. (2022). You Are Fake News! Factors Impacting Journalists' Debunking Behaviors on Social Media. Digital Journalism, 10(5), 823–842. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2021.2004554.

Sixto-García, J., Silva-Rodríguez, A., Rodríguez-Vázquez, A. I., & López-García, X. (2022). Redefining journalistic narratives, distribution strategies and user involvement from innovation in digital native media. Journalism, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1177/14648849211062766.

Schapals, A. K., Maares, P. & Hanusch, F . (2019). Working at the margins: Comparative perspectives on the roles and motivations of peripheral actors in journalism. Media and Communication, 7(4), 19–30. https://doi.org/10.17645/mac.v7i4.2374.

Suenzo, F., Boczkowski, P. J., & Mitchelstein, E. (2020). The crisis of the written press: A bibliographical review to rethink it from Latin America. Cuadernos.Info, 47, 1–25. https://doi.org/10.7764/CDI.47.1867.

Tandoc, E. C., & Maitra, J. (2018). News organizations’ use of Native Videos on Facebook: Tweaking the journalistic field one algorithm change at a time. New Media and Society, 20(5), 1679–1696. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444817702398.

Vázquez-Herrero, J., Negreira-Rey, M.-C., & Zago, G. (2022). Young audience wanted! Journalism looks to the future. In B. García-Orosa, S. Pérez-Seijo, & Á. Vizoso (Eds.), Emerging practices in the age of automated digital journalism: models, languages, and storytelling (pp. 56–66). Routledge.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journalism and Media is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • journalism
  • media
  • business models
  • digitalization
  • artificial intelligence
  • disinformation
  • branding

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 324 KiB  
Article
Innovation in Digital Media beyond Technology: The Audience-Centered Approach and Pending Challenges
by Sara Pérez-Seijo and Alba Silva-Rodríguez
Journal. Media 2024, 5(1), 311-324; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia5010021 - 06 Mar 2024
Viewed by 846
Abstract
In the digital scenario, where news media organizations face technological disruption, innovation has been identified as key to the survival of journalism. While legacy media, rooted in a traditional mindset, have reacted more slowly to the changes that have occurred, digital native media [...] Read more.
In the digital scenario, where news media organizations face technological disruption, innovation has been identified as key to the survival of journalism. While legacy media, rooted in a traditional mindset, have reacted more slowly to the changes that have occurred, digital native media have been better able to engage with audiences and adapt to new distribution platforms. Given this scenario, this article examined the perception of experts in the field of communication and journalism—both journalists and scholars—regarding the approach to journalistic innovation in digital media (N = 11). Specifically, this research sought to identify areas where the need for innovation is perceived to be greater and to determine the pending challenges in this process of digital innovation. To address these purposes, a descriptive qualitative methodology was applied, using the focus group technique. The findings revealed that an audience-centered approach to innovation is proposed to escape technological determinism and respond effectively to the needs and demands of audiences. This perspective requires embracing diversity in content, advocating for new formats and narratives, and adapting to consumption patterns on new platforms. There is a perception of incremental innovation in digital media, focusing on the introduction of small improvements and calling for a slowdown in processes for greater effectiveness. However, the experts noted a lack of pedagogy within organizations, of collaboration with key sectors of the industry, of investment in human capital, of qualitative audience measurement methods, and even of innovation in business models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Roles of Journalism and Disruptive Media: A Challenging Future)
13 pages, 289 KiB  
Article
Together against “the Truth Gap”: A Proposal to Fight Invisibility and Misinformation Affecting Women
by Beatriz Martínez Rodríguez
Journal. Media 2024, 5(1), 298-310; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia5010020 - 05 Mar 2024
Viewed by 378
Abstract
In 2020, the Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP) marked its silver anniversary by releasing its sixth report on the representation of women in the global media landscape, and in 2021, the NGO Plan International unveiled the tenth edition of its report “State of [...] Read more.
In 2020, the Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP) marked its silver anniversary by releasing its sixth report on the representation of women in the global media landscape, and in 2021, the NGO Plan International unveiled the tenth edition of its report “State of the World’s Girls: The Truth Gap”. The study focused on how misinformation impacts equal opportunities for girls, adolescents, and young women worldwide, and proposed strategies to combat the “truth gap”. These examples showcase the collective efforts made in recent decades by professionals, academia, institutions, NGOs, and activists to enhance the state of information globally. The aspiration is ambitious, aiming to make information more transparent, accessible, and inclusive, fostering equality, truth-seeking, and the visibility of women, young people, and rural populations. However, the findings from the GMMP reports, as well as the analysis conducted by Plan International and numerous other works, underscore that despite evident social changes worldwide—particularly in the educational, labor, and social realms for women—access to truthful and high-quality information remains elusive. Simultaneously, studies reveal a declining public trust, especially among young people, in traditional media, a shift to alternative information sources, and a deterioration in the quality benchmarks of the journalism profession. Journalism, a pursuit of truth from sources to the public, has historically been and should remain a pillar upholding democracy and freedom. This article employs a qualitative case study methodology to analyze the best practices proposed across various domains to safeguard information quality. Special attention is given to initiatives that aim to involve women and young people in the collective effort against misinformation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Roles of Journalism and Disruptive Media: A Challenging Future)
15 pages, 337 KiB  
Article
Information Disorders in the Chilean and Spanish Press: A Comparison Using Thematic Modelling
by Gema Alcolea-Díaz, Noelia Zurro-Antón and Luis Cárcamo-Ulloa
Journal. Media 2024, 5(1), 148-162; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia5010011 - 27 Jan 2024
Viewed by 734
Abstract
This article focuses on the role of information disorders in media coverage of cancer as a growing public health problem on both sides of the Atlantic. Taking the examples of Chile and Spain, we analysed news (n = 5522) published by major [...] Read more.
This article focuses on the role of information disorders in media coverage of cancer as a growing public health problem on both sides of the Atlantic. Taking the examples of Chile and Spain, we analysed news (n = 5522) published by major digital newspaper outlets in both countries between 2020 and 2022 to explore the elements of contextual information disorders, the over- and/or under-representation of mentions of sources and actors, and major latent topics in both journalistic systems. To achieve these objectives, we employed topic modelling and coherence techniques. The results revealed a high number of references to institutional, administrative, and political sources and actors, followed by mentions of issuers of strategic communication and, less frequently, patients’ associations. The discourses differed in their underlying topics, with risk factors and psycho-social factors being the most frequently addressed in the Spanish press and geo-political and institutional health contexts being the most frequently mentioned in the Chilean press. The topic of advances in research, however, was common in both journalistic systems. This article closes by identifying future challenges in health communication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Roles of Journalism and Disruptive Media: A Challenging Future)
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