Journalism in Africa: New Trends

A special issue of Journalism and Media (ISSN 2673-5172).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 1333

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Journalism, College of Communication Arts and Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Interests: African media, democracy, and governance; press and politics; political communication; international journalism and broadcasting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is scholarly evidence that journalism as a profession and the media as an institution function are coterminous with their structural environment, which could range from social or cultural to political, technological, or economic environments. Meanwhile, the last few decades have spawned seismic transformations within African society. New digital technologies have emerged and changed how journalism has been practiced; governance systems have seen drastic changes with contrasting consequences for media freedom; the public sphere continues to assume new forms in Africa; and different audiences have found new voice within new digital discursive spaces. These changes undoubtedly challenge old conceptions of journalism and the media in Africa, and therefore excite intellectual curiosity regarding journalism and the media’s response to these structural shifts in Africa. Subsequently, this Special Issue welcomes papers that would deepen our understanding of how journalism and the media in Africa are responding to these structural transformations. We therefore invite papers that contribute to the theme of African media and structural change.

This Special Issue would therefore cover the following broad areas:

  • The rise of digital media and social media in Africa and how this is changing the way news is produced, distributed, and consumed on the continent.
  • The challenges facing African journalists and media organizations, such as censorship, government repression, and economic pressures.
  • The emergence of new forms of journalism in Africa, such as data journalism, investigative journalism, and citizen journalism, and the impact these new forms are having on the media landscape.
  • The role of African journalists and media organizations in promoting democracy, human rights, and social justice on the continent.
  • The opportunities and challenges presented by international partnerships and collaborations between African and non-African media organizations.
  • Press performance, accountability, and the problem of journalistic corruption.
  • Gender roles and demographic make-up of Africa media landscape.
  • Commercial implications of audience fragmentation for media viability.

Prof. Dr. Folu Ogundimu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journalism and Media is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • digital media
  • African media and democracy
  • journalism trends in Africa
  • African media institutions
  • political economy of African media

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 2447 KiB  
Article
Digital Shifts and Ethno-Political Dynamics: Examining Event and Actor Designation in the Cameroon Boko Haram Terrorism Conflict through Print and Online Platforms
by Willy Stephane Abondo Ndo
Journal. Media 2024, 5(1), 359-381; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia5010024 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 489
Abstract
This study examines how the issue of ethnic identity is approached in Cameroon within the context of combating Boko Haram terrorism, considering the influence of the rise of social media on journalistic practices. The advent of these platforms has fundamentally altered the landscape [...] Read more.
This study examines how the issue of ethnic identity is approached in Cameroon within the context of combating Boko Haram terrorism, considering the influence of the rise of social media on journalistic practices. The advent of these platforms has fundamentally altered the landscape of media coverage, challenging the traditional monopoly of journalists in shaping the narrative of news. How does this technological shift affect the discourse, especially in the designation of events and actors in the reporting of Boko Haram terrorism in Cameroon, whether in traditional print media or on online platforms like Facebook? Do these designations in print media and Facebook discussion forums indicate shifts in the dynamics of the Cameroonian media sphere (censorship, government repression, etc.), resulting from the emergence of new voices in digital discursive spaces? This study employs a dual analysis, integrating a critical examination of media discourse with a sociological study of journalistic production. The scrutiny of media discourse is based on the investigation of 497 articles published between 1st January and 30 June 2015, sourced from seven Cameroonian newspapers. The online corpus encompasses 450 written publications from three Facebook forums. We aim to establish a dialectical relationship between newspaper discourse, online content, and the sociological foundations shaping their production. The observed quality of designations in the studied forums unveils a surge in hate speech within the ethno-political landscape of Cameroon. While this phenomenon remained manageable through the intervention of state regulatory bodies in traditional media, the unrestrained nature of online content, coupled with the absence of state control, has facilitated the rise of inter-ethnic discursive hatred in politics. In conclusion, this study underscores the challenges stemming from the evolution of journalistic practices in a technological landscape and emphasizes the urgent need for regulatory frameworks to counteract the upswing in hate speech and inter-ethnic tensions within political discourse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Journalism in Africa: New Trends)
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16 pages, 301 KiB  
Article
Knowledge and Use of the 2011 Freedom of Information Act among Journalists in Nigeria
by Ogemdi Uchenna Eze
Journal. Media 2024, 5(1), 255-270; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia5010017 - 23 Feb 2024
Viewed by 459
Abstract
This study examined the knowledge and use of the 2011 Freedom of Information Act among journalists in Nigeria. The hierarchy of influences model provided the theoretical lens, which guided the study. Through a survey of 313 Nigerian journalists, the study found that there [...] Read more.
This study examined the knowledge and use of the 2011 Freedom of Information Act among journalists in Nigeria. The hierarchy of influences model provided the theoretical lens, which guided the study. Through a survey of 313 Nigerian journalists, the study found that there was a high level of knowledge of the Act among Nigerian journalists. Nigerian journalists perceived the Act as a useful journalistic tool, and they often used it for such purposes as confirming facts, writing controversial topics and to gain insight into the inner working of government. The study showed that, in the use of the Act in journalistic duties, Nigerian journalists were confronted with the challenges of non-integration of the provisions of the Act in the operations of government agencies, adversarial disposition of government institutions towards journalists and the pervasive culture of secrecy. The study established that knowledge of the Act positively correlated with its use. The implications of the findings were discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Journalism in Africa: New Trends)
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