Privacy-Enhancing Technologies for User Systems to Foster a More Ethical E-society

A special issue of Journal of Cybersecurity and Privacy (ISSN 2624-800X). This special issue belongs to the section "Privacy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2024 | Viewed by 6351

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute for Information Systems, University of Münster, Schlosspl. 2, 48149 Münster, Germany
Interests: privacy; security; user systems

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Guest Editor
Ruhr-Universitat Bochum, Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum, Germany
Interests: privacy; security; recommendation systems

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Guest Editor
Department of Software Engineering and Artificial Intelligence (DISIA), Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering, Office 431, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: computer security; cyber security; privacy; information security; cryptography; intrusion detection; malware; trust; anonymity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Telecommunication Networks and Services, SAMOVAR lab, Telecom SudParis, Institut Polytechnique de Paris, 91011 Evry, France
Interests: security and privacy; identity management; personal data protection; IoT security and privacy; cloud-computing security; applied cryptography; lightweight cryptographic algorithms and protocols; privacy-enhancing technology; database anonymization; blockchain-based services with support of privacy; application to energy; smart city and health contexts

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Guest Editor
Department of Information and Communication Systems Engineering, University of the Aegean, 83100 Samos, Greece
Interests: mobile and wireless networks security and privacy; VoIP security; IoT security and privacy; DNS security; intrusion detection systems; security education
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In today's age of digitalization, the privacy of users and data is more important than ever. It is urgent to develop well-designed privacy approaches, algorithms, models, and policies to preserve information that is meant to be kept private.

While a legitimate use of data for new business models is indispensable in today's world, the use of personal information without the users’ consent or even their awareness must be prevented. Furthermore, the prevention of cyber-attacks aimed at capturing data and information is a growing challenge in this context.

We call for research papers on approaches to maintain and strengthen the privacy of users and systems. Suggested topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Anonymity
  • Blockchain privacy
  • Cloud computing privacy
  • Cryptography for privacy
  • Data protection
  • Differential privacy
  • Internet of Things privacy
  • Location privacy
  • Mobile devices
  • Network privacy
  • Privacy economics
  • Privacy measurement
  • Social media privacy
  • Surveillance
  • Tracking technologies and mitigation
  • User privacy

Prof. Dr. Thomas Hupperich
Dr. Martin Degeling
Dr. Luis Javier García Villalba
Prof. Dr. Maryline Laurent
Dr. Georgios Kambourakis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Cybersecurity and Privacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • anonymity
  • web privacy
  • blockchain privacy
  • cloud computing privacy
  • cryptography for privacy
  • data protection
  • differential privacy
  • internet of things privacy
  • location privacy
  • mobile devices privacy
  • network privacy
  • privacy measurement
  • social media privacy
  • surveillance
  • tracking technologies and mitigation
  • user privacy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

29 pages, 3471 KiB  
Article
Experiential Transformation in Privacy Behavior: A New Framework for Privacy Behavior Enhancement
by Ioannis Paspatis and Aggeliki Tsohou
J. Cybersecur. Priv. 2024, 4(1), 76-104; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcp4010005 - 07 Feb 2024
Viewed by 953
Abstract
Multiple studies have demonstrated that the conventional method of learning is suboptimal when our goal is to enhance individuals’ genuine privacy behavior. This study introduces a framework for transforming privacy behavior, with the objective of enhancing individuals’ privacy practices to a higher level [...] Read more.
Multiple studies have demonstrated that the conventional method of learning is suboptimal when our goal is to enhance individuals’ genuine privacy behavior. This study introduces a framework for transforming privacy behavior, with the objective of enhancing individuals’ privacy practices to a higher level of confidentiality. We performed an experiment on a limited number of people to validate the efficacy of our suggested transformation framework. This framework combined determining aspects of privacy behavior with experiential behavior modification methodologies such as neutral stimuli (e.g., cognitive behavioral transformation—CBTx), practical assessments and motivational interviews from other disciplines. While these methods have proven effective in fields like psychology and sociology, they have not yet been applied to the realm of Information Computer and Technology (ICT). In this study, we have effectively demonstrated the efficacy of the proposed framework through a five-phase experiment. The suggested framework has the potential to be advantageous for educational institutions, including both public and private schools as well as universities, to construct new frameworks or develop new methodologies regarding individuals’ privacy behavior transformation to a more protective one. Furthermore, our framework offers a conducive environment for further investigation into privacy behavior transformation methodologies. Full article
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24 pages, 923 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Security and Privacy of Baby Monitor Apps
by Lukas Schmidt, Henry Hosseini and Thomas Hupperich
J. Cybersecur. Priv. 2023, 3(3), 303-326; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcp3030016 - 29 Jun 2023
Viewed by 2788
Abstract
Emerging technologies in video monitoring solutions seriously threaten personal privacy, as current technologies hold the potential for total surveillance. These concerns apply in particular to baby monitor solutions incorporating mobile applications due to the potential privacy impact of combining sensitive video recordings with [...] Read more.
Emerging technologies in video monitoring solutions seriously threaten personal privacy, as current technologies hold the potential for total surveillance. These concerns apply in particular to baby monitor solutions incorporating mobile applications due to the potential privacy impact of combining sensitive video recordings with access to the vast amount of private data on a cell phone. Therefore, this study extends the state of privacy research by assessing the security and privacy of popular baby monitor apps. We analyze network security measures that aim to protect baby monitoring streams, evaluate the corresponding privacy policies, and identify privacy leaks by performing network traffic analysis. Our results point to several problems that may compromise user privacy. We conclude that our methods can support the evaluation of the security and privacy of video surveillance solutions and discuss how to improve the protection of user data. Full article
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16 pages, 2060 KiB  
Article
A Lesson for the Future: Will You Let Me Violate Your Privacy to Save Your Life?
by Khosro Salmani and Brian Atuh
J. Cybersecur. Priv. 2023, 3(2), 259-274; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcp3020014 - 14 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1409
Abstract
COVID-19 was an unprecedented pandemic that changed the lives of everyone. To handle the virus’s rapid spread, governments and big tech companies, such as Google and Apple, implemented Contact Tracing Applications (CTAs). However, the response by the public was different in each country. [...] Read more.
COVID-19 was an unprecedented pandemic that changed the lives of everyone. To handle the virus’s rapid spread, governments and big tech companies, such as Google and Apple, implemented Contact Tracing Applications (CTAs). However, the response by the public was different in each country. While some countries mandated downloading the application for their citizens, others made it optional, revealing contrasting patterns to the spread of COVID-19. In this study, in addition to investigating the privacy and security of the Canadian CTA, COVID Alert, we aim to disclose the public’s perception of these varying patterns. Additionally, if known of the results of other nations, would Canadians sacrifice their freedoms to prevent the spread of a future pandemic? Hence, a survey was conducted, gathering responses from 154 participants across Canada. Next, we questioned the participants regarding the COVID-19 pandemic and their knowledge and opinion of CTAs before presenting our findings regarding other countries. After showing our results, we then asked the participants their views of CTAs again. The arrangement of the preceding questions, the findings, and succeeding questions to identify whether Canadians’ opinions on CTAs would change, after presenting the proper evidence, were performed. Among all of our findings, there is a clear difference between before and after the findings regarding whether CTAs should be mandatory, with 34% of participants agreeing before and 56% agreeing afterward. This hints that all the public needed was information to decide whether or not to participate. In addition, this exposes the value of transparency and communication when persuading the public to collaborate. Finally, we offer three recommendations on how governments and health authorities can respond effectively in a future pandemic and increase the adoption rate for CTAs to save more lives. Full article
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